Depression

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Message 1875497 - Posted: 28 Jun 2017, 14:30:08 UTC
Last modified: 28 Jun 2017, 14:36:08 UTC

This thread is for promoting understanding, not perpetuating stigma. Please remember when posting.
I have no specialist knowledge other than a career in general nursing. If you've suffered from it, are suffering currently, or know someone who is, your knowledge will be superior to mine and welcomed. If by posting here, you become the recipient of unpleasant personal messages or receive one about someone else, either call it out here, or PM* me. Thanks.
Hayley

* I hope that is a sufficient deterrent to anyone considering doing so
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Message 1875503 - Posted: 28 Jun 2017, 15:12:36 UTC

My wife has always been depressed, even since she was a child and tried to kill herself by deliberately walking out in front of a car. When we first got together, we tried treatment with medication, but that sent her on a chemical roller coaster that almost ended in her death. Years later, things got very bad again. Our regular doctor gave her a medication that helped a lot. She is still very depressed and easily triggered into severe bouts, but overall is much better than she was before medication. In addition to feeling like she doesn't care about anything, she is extremely negative about most everything. I do my best to reassure her, and provide the best I can. I never force her to do things, but do my best to guide her to good decisions. It doesn't always work. I know that depression is a serious ailment that one can't just snap out of. It is a life altering situation. Sometimes the treatment can be even worse than the disorder.

Steve
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Message 1875515 - Posted: 28 Jun 2017, 16:35:01 UTC - in response to Message 1875503.  
Last modified: 28 Jun 2017, 16:47:11 UTC

Hi Steve. Got a pile of beer mats that I keep meaning to send you, to go with the other lot.

In addition to feeling like she doesn't care about anything, she is extremely negative about most everything

We all know some people that are always negative, never seem to have a good word to say about anyone or anything. We put them down to just being miserable people. Could they actually be clinically depressed instead? Maybe without knowing it? I cannot judge that as I have no medical training. Obviously you know your own good lady wife better than anyone, and I am quite sure that the course you have taken is the right one for you and her. Sometimes it appears medication is worse than no treatment at all, other times it helps a lot. I wish you both all the best.
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Message 1875573 - Posted: 29 Jun 2017, 1:04:28 UTC

See My profile.

I'd say more but I just got of the hospital, see the raccoon thread.
H.R. 1469 makes SSI, EITC, ACA, Medicaid, SNAP, LiHeap, Heap, etc, etc, etc, all temporary, w/a 5yr lifetime limit like TANF! Can't work? Die!!
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Message 1875575 - Posted: 29 Jun 2017, 1:08:56 UTC

I've been depressed all my life, but other than my dad dying when I was 13, and now my mother's death, I don't have any situational excuse. It all boils down to neurochemistry for me. Some people just have a brain with a lot of good neurotransmitters firing in abundance across the synapses. I don't.
The mind is a weird and mysterious place
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Message 1875578 - Posted: 29 Jun 2017, 1:16:49 UTC

I do understand that depression can be both biological and environmental. It is rooted in biological. I also understand that it is no joke. I feel for anyone either going through it or is with someone going through it. I really do.

Steve
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Message 1875634 - Posted: 29 Jun 2017, 7:25:43 UTC

What doesn't help is the platitudes that some people use e.g. pat you on the back and say don't worry it might never happen and pull yourself together man, cheer up worse things happen at sea, etc. But some people are very good at putting on a brave face whilst hurting inside.

At the moment most people I know are a bit down because of what's been happing in the UK. this year. All these terror attacks, the London Grenfell fire, the Hillsborough enquiry, Brexit, government hanging on by its fingertips, almost zero interest on savings etc. And further afield the Middle East turmoil, N Korea, USA with Trump, Germany with Merkel and so on. Reasons to be cheerfull 1 2 3? Hard to find 1 at the moment.

But it's not clinical or manic depression it's just being a bit fed up and browned off., and we all go through phases of that. Then you meet our postie a very nice Asian Lady, always happy, always cheerful, come rain wind snow or sunshine. Then there's Mr grumpy 4 doors down that glares at everyone!

But as Steve says genuine depression is debilitating for everyone, and there is not enough public awareness of it.
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Message 1875649 - Posted: 29 Jun 2017, 10:45:46 UTC

Depression comes in many forms, almost as many as people suffering from it. Some folks can very effectively put on an act that hides what is going on inside - I did for over a year. Until a friend found me sitting outside my back door with a large chisel pointed to my chest - he knocked me out without saying anything, then took me to the doctors when I'd come round.
Bob Smith
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Message 1875663 - Posted: 29 Jun 2017, 12:04:47 UTC - in response to Message 1875649.  
Last modified: 29 Jun 2017, 12:05:55 UTC

Thank god he found you in time Rob. I would have just kicked it out of your hands then maybe called an ambulance. At any rate I would have tried to stop you doing what you were obviously thinking of. Perhaps I have been luckier than I have ever thought. I can only hope it continues. Whilst also sparing many kind thoughts for those not so fortunate.
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Message 1875674 - Posted: 29 Jun 2017, 13:29:09 UTC

He's an ex-Army medic, so the action was very quick. Six years ago now, I can look back on that time, and the preceding year or so and see the progressive descent into the abyss, then the climb out over another year. A combination of drugs and therapy were needed to get me pointing in the right direction.
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Message 1875748 - Posted: 29 Jun 2017, 21:59:08 UTC
Last modified: 29 Jun 2017, 21:59:46 UTC

With my wife being a nurse, the death of our son at the age of three from meningitis, plunged her into severe depression so distressing to witness, the following two years I spent living in constant dread I would lose her too, by her own hand. She's suffered with depression ever since, including periods requiring medical alleviation for it. That all began twenty years ago this April.

Before losing our son, we'd planned a second child within the year. It never happened and is a subject I have long since stopped trying to raise with her. The death of her sister just before Christmas 2014, and the process of adopting her three young children however, have allowed me to see again the wonderful mother she was to our little boy. It is a bittersweet transformation.
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Message 1875811 - Posted: 30 Jun 2017, 5:38:53 UTC - in response to Message 1875748.  
Last modified: 30 Jun 2017, 5:40:22 UTC

The loss of a child must be truly heart breaking and I don't think that any parent could ever truly come to terms with it. But adoption is a wonderful thing for those that need it, but yes it must be bittersweet in the circumstances. But there is a blood tie there between her and the kids whether Nephews or Nieces.

What is also so sad is people that have tried so hard to have children but mother nature was against them, but they would have made such wonderful parents. Then you see the way that some parents neglect their children, and it makes you weep at the injustice of it all.
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Message 1875840 - Posted: 30 Jun 2017, 9:05:55 UTC

This story of someone fighting back has particularly moved me.

Worth reading
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Message 1875848 - Posted: 30 Jun 2017, 9:50:06 UTC
Last modified: 30 Jun 2017, 9:51:21 UTC

I'm one of those folks who must have some good brain chemicals. I see the upside of even mishaps that occur. How ever that being said.
When my second wife was in a car accident and was in a coma for 13 days before she died. That sent me for a loop.
Id come home and still feel her presence in the house. But of course she wasnt there. It was hard seeing the things that she and I had bought to make our home. So I started working overtime so I didn't have to go home. And when I did go home I went to bed. Well working 70 hours plus a week for 2 months straight did not work. It only made me angry that she had died. Then I was mad at myself for being angry at her.
It was a tough 7 months. Before I found an online support group of widows and widowers.
In our discussions I found that every thing I was going through is normal. That's when I found relief in my soul.
It was after that I started to become myself again. My mom told me later , We were worried about you. Geez I wish they would have said they were worried about me when I was worried about me. ( it might have helped get me started sooner for some help)
So was I depressed or just going through the grieving process? Me I think it was both. And I will tell you up front, I don't want to go there again.
[/quote]

Old James
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Message 1875883 - Posted: 30 Jun 2017, 12:57:58 UTC
Last modified: 30 Jun 2017, 13:00:26 UTC

Depression.....................it's a bitch.

I suppose a few were wondering when I was going to chime in on the subject..................................

As one who has struggled with it from my teenage years onward, I can tell ya it is tough.
And made even tougher at times when one tries to deal with it by relying on alcohol as a constant crutch and companion.
But, that is the way I have lived for over 40 years. One of my younger brothers did not survive that battle. He committed suicide when I was about 20yo, and that sent me even deeper down the rabbithole.

I have always shunned the idea of getting 'professional help'. Still do. I am such a strong willed and independent soul, I know that I am the only one who can change myself. If it does not come from within me, it just ain't gonna happen, and all the expert advice or counseling in the world would not budge me off center no matter how well intended.

That being said, I have recently made a couple of changes.
I finally decided, after years of pondering, to try some pharmaceutical help. I decided. Of my own accord, not because somebody who thinks they know me better than I know myself told me I should do so. This was MY choice, and mine alone.

Working with my GP, not a flippin psych major, I started taking bupropion 65 days ago. It is a NDRI, which means it works by trying to raise the availability of norepinephrine and dopamine in the brain. Because alcohol really messes with this stuff, and because I truly wanted to give it an honest shot, I also temporarily stopped drinking a week before starting the med. Have not had any since.

I cannot say that I have noticed a marked improvement in my depressive state so far. Two weeks ago, we raised the dosage from 150 to 300mg. It takes this stuff about 6-8 weeks to settle out, so I am not sure what effect that will have yet. I can say that the medication has markedly increased my 'up-time'. I used to sleep 10-12 hours a day, given the chance. Getting out of bed was not generally the high point of my day. Since starting this medication, I am awake at the crack of dawn, and not usually being able to doze off again, I get up. Sometimes I am able to take a short cat nap before I go to work in the afternoon. But I don't think I've gotten more than 6 hours of sleep a night since I started it. Sometimes as little as 3 or 4 hours.

If, in a few more weeks, I have not noticed an improvement in my outlook on life, my next step will be to add a SSRI to what I am taking. SSRI meds try to raise the availability of serotonin, the 3rd main brain chemical relating to one's mood and activity levels. There are 6 of them currently available, and I am researching the pros and cons of them trying to decide which one to try. And believe me, they all have many side effects and possible down sides.

These medications are filled with uncertainty. You are trying to rewire the neural network in your brain by changing the chemical communication network between it's cells and synapses. And everybody's brain is different. So what may work for one person can have the opposite effect in another. These drugs can straighten you out, or they can really mess you up. You can see that in the many reviews people have posted when researching this stuff. None of the 6 SSRIs has more than a 7 out of 10 rating in most user surveys. It's really quite the roll of the dice, it would seem.

But, I am giving it a go. Trying to climb out of the rabbithole.
I may very well drink again one day. I may not. But at least not until I give these meds a chance to stabilize and do whatever it is they are gonna do.

Yeah, depression...............it's a bitch.
Better living through chemistry? Only time will tell for the kittyman.

Meow.
A kitty keeps loneliness away.
More meowing, less hissing. I speak meow, do you?

Have made friends in this life.
Most were cats.
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Message 1875888 - Posted: 30 Jun 2017, 13:30:25 UTC

Mark, you are accurately describing the chemical roller coaster I mentioned above. It is a big dice roll, and every patient is different.
I salute you for taking your own initiative to try to improve your outlook on life. I sincerely hope you find the right chemical composition if it exists for you.
It is not easy, but if successful, is life changing.
My thoughts are with you and everyone dealing with this tremendous issue.

Steve
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Message 1875895 - Posted: 30 Jun 2017, 14:05:48 UTC

I've been depressed in my youth and treated by doctors with therapies which included ECT, which was a horrible experience. Since I am not willing to talk about my health problems, I limit myself to send my sympathy to all affected by this problem, which can be overcome. Greetings to all.
Tullio
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Message 1875897 - Posted: 30 Jun 2017, 14:15:59 UTC - in response to Message 1875895.  
Last modified: 30 Jun 2017, 14:23:56 UTC

Electroconvulsive therapy ECT is still used in Sweden...
http://www.psykiatriregister.se/content/ect-english-0
ECT treatments are mostly used in Sweden
Quoting a chief physician in psychiatry.
I have to say that I never saw such frequent and boundless use of ECT treatments as in Sweden.
The use of ECT only increases in Sweden, when almost all other countries decrease or directly prohibit it. Lastly, ECT was banned from Ireland and entirely in some regions of Italy.
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Message 1875904 - Posted: 30 Jun 2017, 15:04:29 UTC - in response to Message 1875888.  

Mark, you are accurately describing the chemical roller coaster I mentioned above. It is a big dice roll, and every patient is different.
I salute you for taking your own initiative to try to improve your outlook on life. I sincerely hope you find the right chemical composition if it exists for you.
It is not easy, but if successful, is life changing.
My thoughts are with you and everyone dealing with this tremendous issue.

Steve

Thank you, Steve.

It's kinda funny, but I have joked many times over the years about having a few times when all my little brain chemicals were in alignment, playing nice together, and I was having a good day.

I guess until now that I have been researching antidepressant medications, I did not realize how actually true that statement may have been.

And now that I am more aware of the situation, I also now know that rearranging one's neurotransmitter chemicals via medication can be successful, given time, patience, and experimentation.

But it is often, no pun intended, more like herding cats.

Meow.
A kitty keeps loneliness away.
More meowing, less hissing. I speak meow, do you?

Have made friends in this life.
Most were cats.
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Message 1875998 - Posted: 30 Jun 2017, 21:54:56 UTC

My blankets fell off and it.s 0.8 degrees C. Am I depressed???? No way!!!
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Message boards : Cafe SETI : Depression


 
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