SpaceX rocket supplying space station explodes after Florida launch

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Message 1696499 - Posted: 28 Jun 2015, 17:23:26 UTC

:((((((

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - An unmanned Space Exploration Technologies rocket exploded about two minutes after liftoff from Florida on Sunday, destroying a cargo ship bound for the International Space Station in the latest in a string of mishaps in supplying the orbiting outpost.

The 208-foot-tall (63-meter) rocket, built and flown by the company known as SpaceX that is owned by technology entrepreneur Elon Musk, had previously made 18 successful launches since its 2010 debut. Those included six cargo runs for NASA under a 15-flight contract worth more than $2 billion.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/06/28/us-space-spacex-launch-idUSKCN0P80NM20150628
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Message 1696503 - Posted: 28 Jun 2015, 17:39:17 UTC - in response to Message 1696499.  

Ouch, so much for Private doing this better..
H.R. 1469 Cuts SSI, EITC, ACA, Medicaid, SNAP, LiHeap, Heap, etc, etc, etc, all temporary, w/a 5yr lifetime limit like TANF! Can't work? Die!!
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Message 1696508 - Posted: 28 Jun 2015, 17:48:17 UTC - in response to Message 1696503.  

Ouch, so much for Private doing this better..

Actually, Vic, one mishap in 18 missions is pretty damned good. They've been working with NASA and having launches since 2010.

SpaceX is the future of space exploration. Elon Musk WILL get us to Mars! :-)


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Message 1696526 - Posted: 28 Jun 2015, 18:49:24 UTC
Last modified: 28 Jun 2015, 18:51:28 UTC

Vic, you are forgetting the Challenger and Columbia shuttles, at least this one was unmanned.

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Message 1696615 - Posted: 29 Jun 2015, 1:40:36 UTC

Not having much luck lately with there launches to resupply the space station .

3 attempts and they have all failed . Wonder if NASA is questioning weather shutting the shuttle program down was a good idea .

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Message 1696621 - Posted: 29 Jun 2015, 2:28:00 UTC

Going into space is dangerous business, no matter who does it. Out of 137 launches one space shuttle was lost at launch and another on reentry. Initially NASA expected a higher loss rate. In many ways we are fortunate to have only lost the two. If the USA and the rest of the nations wanting to put humans in space can't tolerate any further loss of life then we may as well declare an end to manned space flight now.
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Message 1696647 - Posted: 29 Jun 2015, 4:12:05 UTC

Do they have backup supplies when payloads are lost?
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Message 1696652 - Posted: 29 Jun 2015, 4:38:15 UTC - in response to Message 1696647.  

Do they have backup supplies when payloads are lost?

Obviously yes for all consumables. Food, water, oxygen, propellants, etc. They should have for all the lost hardware as well, but it may have been being used as a test piece on earth and will need to be cleaned and certified for flight. Only thing I can think of off hand that recently flew they would not have was the Olympic torch.

Or did you mean backup already on orbit? Yes, they like to keep at least six months ahead on consumable supplies.

With the loss of three almost in a row however they may have to cut back to a crew of three for a while until they catch up. Especially if they can't get the supply chain up and running PDQ.
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Message 1696674 - Posted: 29 Jun 2015, 6:15:05 UTC - in response to Message 1696652.  

Do they have backup supplies when payloads are lost?

Obviously yes for all consumables. Food, water, oxygen, propellants, etc. They should have for all the lost hardware as well, but it may have been being used as a test piece on earth and will need to be cleaned and certified for flight. Only thing I can think of off hand that recently flew they would not have was the Olympic torch.

Or did you mean backup already on orbit? Yes, they like to keep at least six months ahead on consumable supplies.

With the loss of three almost in a row however they may have to cut back to a crew of three for a while until they catch up. Especially if they can't get the supply chain up and running PDQ.


Right, I was thinking about what's already up there, plus science experiments being sent.

Why would they send the Olympic torch up?
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Message 1696686 - Posted: 29 Jun 2015, 7:53:15 UTC

Why would they send the Olympic torch up?

Simply because the Olympic Games torch is one of the most iconic items on the planet, recognisable to anybody. To have it orbiting the planet itself for the first time its 2800 year history seems completely fitting to me.

The Shuttle was originally conceived of and presented to the public in 1972 as a "space truck" which would, among other things, be used to build a United States space station in low earth orbit in the early-1990s and then be replaced by a new vehicle. When the concept of the U.S. space station evolved into that of the International Space Station, which suffered from long delays and design changes before it could be completed, the service life of the Space Shuttle was extended several times until 2011 when it was finally retired

Apart from which it was getting difficult to get spares for the aging fleet, and in any case Congress refused to fund it any further. They cold have gone on for another 5 years max maybe, but the will and the money was not there.
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Message 1696886 - Posted: 30 Jun 2015, 3:03:18 UTC - in response to Message 1696686.  

Why would they send the Olympic torch up?


Simply because the Olympic Games torch is one of the most iconic items on the planet, recognisable to anybody. To have it orbiting the planet itself for the first time its 2800 year history seems completely fitting to me.


Well, when you at it that way... :~)
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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : SpaceX rocket supplying space station explodes after Florida launch


 
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