Black Holes part 3

Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Black Holes part 3
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Message 1887934 - Posted: 5 Sep 2017, 1:05:20 UTC

The new findings about black holes can continue.

Steve
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Profile LynnProject Donor
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Message 1887956 - Posted: 5 Sep 2017, 5:34:02 UTC - in response to Message 1887934.  

The discovery of the second largest black hole in the Milky Way

WOW!!!


Massive black hole discovered near heart of the Milky Way


An enormous black hole one hundred thousand times more massive than the sun has been found hiding in a toxic gas cloud wafting around near the heart of the Milky Way.

If the discovery is confirmed, the invisible behemoth will rank as the second largest black hole ever seen in the Milky Way after the supermassive black hole known as Sagittarius A* that is anchored at the very centre of the galaxy.

Thanks Steve.
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Profile Chris SCrowdfunding Project Donor
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Message 1887970 - Posted: 5 Sep 2017, 8:16:07 UTC

The smallest black holes form when particular types of stars explode at the end of their lives. According to scientists’ calculations, the Milky Way is home to about 100m of these smaller black holes, though only about 60 have been spotted.

But astronomers also know that much larger, supermassive black holes lie at the heart of large galaxies including the Milky Way, where Sagittarius A* weighs as much as 400m suns. What is unknown is how these supermassive black holes form.

One theory is that smaller black holes steadily coalesce into larger ones and these come together to form supermassive black holes at the hearts of galaxies, but until now, no definitive evidence for intermediate mass black holes has been found. The detection of a potential black hole weighing as much as 100,000 suns is precisely the middle step in the process that astronomers have sought.


You could think of the universe as a 3 dimensional bowl of water with bits floating in it, that due to surface tension will all end up together in the same place at one point. Or as a pan of bubbling soup with big bangs everywhere.

Mysterious force
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Message 1888047 - Posted: 6 Sep 2017, 3:20:47 UTC

I wonder if this newly discovered black hole will eventually collide with the sag-a black hole at the center of the galaxy as it is only 200 ly out. What a fireworks display that would be.
Bob DeWoody

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Message 1890870 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 6:15:39 UTC - in response to Message 1888047.  


Double Supermassive Black Hole is Most Compact Ever Found


Astronomers have discovered what may be the most compact binary supermassive black hole ever known in a galaxy about 400 million light years from Earth.


Mind Bender.
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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Black Holes part 3


 
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