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Profile Tom M
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Message 1552036 - Posted: 4 Aug 2014, 1:46:08 UTC - in response to Message 1468981.  

Wiggo,
From a distance your I thought your keyboard was an old Atari TV game. The phone looked like one of the joy stick/controllers... then I lean forward... oh well... I can see it now... someone actually ports Seti to an Atari TV console (oh dear...).
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Message 1552037 - Posted: 4 Aug 2014, 1:47:00 UTC - in response to Message 1468859.  

Does the fan turn back and forth to make sure the dust gets cleared out?
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Message 1552042 - Posted: 4 Aug 2014, 1:54:57 UTC - in response to Message 1469819.  

If you have the money you can always use 2 or 3 of these,

http://www.audiovengeance.com/netstorna250a-gpuexternalpcietogpuenclosure.aspx ;-)

Cheers.


Darn it says link not found... :(

Tom
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Message 1552045 - Posted: 4 Aug 2014, 1:59:07 UTC - in response to Message 1469940.  

Tullio,
That looks like some of my older boxes.... does it have an integrated video on the motherboard or am I missing something?

Tom
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Message 1552054 - Posted: 4 Aug 2014, 2:24:46 UTC - in response to Message 1552036.  

Wiggo,
From a distance your I thought your keyboard was an old Atari TV game. The phone looked like one of the joy stick/controllers... then I lean forward... oh well... I can see it now... someone actually ports Seti to an Atari TV console (oh dear...).


Does the fan turn back and forth to make sure the dust gets cleared out?

That was my old M$ keyboard (with palm rest) which went stupid on me couple of days ago (you'd think that a person could get more than 9.5yrs out of 1 of them). :-(

The replacement M$ keyboard is lost on this desk (about 66.6% the size) and I'm still trying to get use to it.

The box fan is just set to blow a steady stream of air behind both cases to the other end of the desk, otherwise I'm sitting in very warm spot (plus that warm air is keeping this end of my shed (20'x20') @ 20C/68F while it's 10C/50F outside (5C/41F with windchill). During summertime here that hot air either goes out the window or the door opposite it.

Cheers.
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Message 1552098 - Posted: 4 Aug 2014, 4:58:16 UTC

Thanks Tullio and every one for info have to try and do something temp. Every Degree helps .
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Message 1552661 - Posted: 5 Aug 2014, 19:59:03 UTC - in response to Message 1552036.  
Last modified: 5 Aug 2014, 20:01:17 UTC

Wiggo,
From a distance your I thought your keyboard was an old Atari TV game. The phone looked like one of the joy stick/controllers... then I lean forward... oh well... I can see it now... someone actually ports Seti to an Atari TV console (oh dear...).


That would be funny. How many millions of years would it take a 6809 (or was it a 6502?) to crunch one unit?
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Message 1552793 - Posted: 6 Aug 2014, 3:46:02 UTC - in response to Message 1552045.  

Tullio,
That looks like some of my older boxes.... does it have an integrated video on the motherboard or am I missing something?

Tom

30: PCI 105.0: 0300 VGA compatible controller (VGA)
[Created at pci.319]
Unique ID: ul7N.RQSHiq1HUSB
Parent ID: H0_h._ZSn+k8yyOB
SysFS ID: /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:06.0/0000:01:05.0
SysFS BusID: 0000:01:05.0
Hardware Class: graphics card
Model: "ATI ES1000 515E"
Vendor: pci 0x1002 "ATI Technologies Inc"
Device: pci 0x515e "ES1000 515E"
SubVendor: pci 0x1002 "ATI Technologies Inc"
SubDevice: pci 0x515e
Revision: 0x02
Driver: "radeon"
Driver Modules: "drm"
Memory Range: 0xf0000000-0xf7ffffff (ro,non-prefetchable)
I/O Ports: 0x4000-0x4fff (rw)
Memory Range: 0xe8100000-0xe810ffff (rw,non-prefetchable)
Memory Range: 0xe8120000-0xe813ffff (ro,non-prefetchable,disabled)
IRQ: 19 (6633 events)
I/O Ports: 0x3c0-0x3df (rw)
Module Alias: "pci:v00001002d0000515Esv00001002sd0000515Ebc03sc00i00"
Driver Info #0:
XFree86 v4 Server Module: radeon
Config Status: cfg=no, avail=yes, need=no, active=unknown
Attached to: #16 (PCI bridge)

Primary display adapter: #30
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Message 1552838 - Posted: 6 Aug 2014, 9:32:59 UTC - in response to Message 1552661.  

Wiggo,
From a distance your I thought your keyboard was an old Atari TV game. The phone looked like one of the joy stick/controllers... then I lean forward... oh well... I can see it now... someone actually ports Seti to an Atari TV console (oh dear...).


That would be funny. How many millions of years would it take a 6809 (or was it a 6502?) to crunch one unit?

Greetings Jim,

"6809" caught my eye on this post here's what I found on Wikipedia:
    The Atari 2600 had a 6507 CPU in it.
    The Atari 5200 had a MOS 6507C CPU (successor to the 2600)
    The Atari 7800 had a SALLY 6502 ("6502C") (successor to the 5200)
    ...


The controller CPU, 68B09E, was used in Radio Shack's Tandy Color Computer. I had several of those. Hitachi came out with a 6309 replacement for the 6809, available from a third party. I took one of my CoCos and de-soldered the 6809 replacing it with a socket for the 6309. The 6809 ran a whopping 1.78 MHz, the 6309 3 MHz.

I doubt it would have take millions of years. ;) But, I do believe it would have taken so much time that the deadline on a WU would have been passed by months, if not years. :)

Keep on BOINCing...! :)


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Message 1553014 - Posted: 6 Aug 2014, 20:27:43 UTC - in response to Message 1552838.  
Last modified: 6 Aug 2014, 20:29:54 UTC

Wiggo,
From a distance your I thought your keyboard was an old Atari TV game. The phone looked like one of the joy stick/controllers... then I lean forward... oh well... I can see it now... someone actually ports Seti to an Atari TV console (oh dear...).


That would be funny. How many millions of years would it take a 6809 (or was it a 6502?) to crunch one unit?

Greetings Jim,

"6809" caught my eye on this post here's what I found on Wikipedia:
    The Atari 2600 had a 6507 CPU in it.
    The Atari 5200 had a MOS 6507C CPU (successor to the 2600)
    The Atari 7800 had a SALLY 6502 ("6502C") (successor to the 5200)
    ...


The controller CPU, 68B09E, was used in Radio Shack's Tandy Color Computer. I had several of those. Hitachi came out with a 6309 replacement for the 6809, available from a third party. I took one of my CoCos and de-soldered the 6809 replacing it with a socket for the 6309. The 6809 ran a whopping 1.78 MHz, the 6309 3 MHz.

I doubt it would have take millions of years. ;) But, I do believe it would have taken so much time that the deadline on a WU would have been passed by months, if not years. :)

Keep on BOINCing...! :)




I was just guessing it was about the same power of my VIC-20... 1 MHz 6502 - no FPU, no MUL, DIV, or MOD, all of which had to be done in software.

Wasn't the 6507 the 28 pin stripped version?

Various companies came out with an improvement to the 6502 called the 65816 (and cmos variants). It had a pin-compatible version to the 6502 with an 8-bit data bus and 16 bit address bus called the 65802, that was actually internally a 65816 (kinda like the 8086 vs the 8088). I actually burned a new set of ROMs that made a 15% or so improvement in speed at the same clock.

Nowadays, you really can't mess around as easily with the new stuff and surface mount without a huge outlay of cash.

[Late edit: Hey, I was noticing my sig graphic. When does BOINC push out the stats to the stats sites? What time of day?]
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Message 1553016 - Posted: 6 Aug 2014, 20:31:27 UTC - in response to Message 1552838.  

Wiggo,
From a distance your I thought your keyboard was an old Atari TV game. The phone looked like one of the joy stick/controllers... then I lean forward... oh well... I can see it now... someone actually ports Seti to an Atari TV console (oh dear...).


That would be funny. How many millions of years would it take a 6809 (or was it a 6502?) to crunch one unit?

Greetings Jim,

"6809" caught my eye on this post here's what I found on Wikipedia:
    The Atari 2600 had a 6507 CPU in it.
    The Atari 5200 had a MOS 6507C CPU (successor to the 2600)
    The Atari 7800 had a SALLY 6502 ("6502C") (successor to the 5200)
    ...


The controller CPU, 68B09E, was used in Radio Shack's Tandy Color Computer. I had several of those. Hitachi came out with a 6309 replacement for the 6809, available from a third party. I took one of my CoCos and de-soldered the 6809 replacing it with a socket for the 6309. The 6809 ran a whopping 1.78 MHz, the 6309 3 MHz.

I doubt it would have take millions of years. ;) But, I do believe it would have taken so much time that the deadline on a WU would have been passed by months, if not years. :)

Keep on BOINCing...! :)


The 65xx family of chips could be obtained in a 1MHz, 2MHz and 3MHz flavor and they were designed so they could do one memory cycle each clock cycle or in other words, one byte each clock cycle. All of the data paths were 8 bit and the only thing that was 16 bit was the program counter. It was great fun to play with but it was best used for control applications and while my computer supported basic, it was no number cruncher.
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Message 1553108 - Posted: 7 Aug 2014, 0:40:31 UTC - in response to Message 1553016.  
Last modified: 7 Aug 2014, 0:45:03 UTC

Wiggo,
From a distance your I thought your keyboard was an old Atari TV game. The phone looked like one of the joy stick/controllers... then I lean forward... oh well... I can see it now... someone actually ports Seti to an Atari TV console (oh dear...).


That would be funny. How many millions of years would it take a 6809 (or was it a 6502?) to crunch one unit?

Greetings Jim,

"6809" caught my eye on this post here's what I found on Wikipedia:
    The Atari 2600 had a 6507 CPU in it.
    The Atari 5200 had a MOS 6507C CPU (successor to the 2600)
    The Atari 7800 had a SALLY 6502 ("6502C") (successor to the 5200)
    ...


The controller CPU, 68B09E, was used in Radio Shack's Tandy Color Computer. I had several of those. Hitachi came out with a 6309 replacement for the 6809, available from a third party. I took one of my CoCos and de-soldered the 6809 replacing it with a socket for the 6309. The 6809 ran a whopping 1.78 MHz, the 6309 3 MHz.

I doubt it would have take millions of years. ;) But, I do believe it would have taken so much time that the deadline on a WU would have been passed by months, if not years. :)

Keep on BOINCing...! :)


The 65xx family of chips could be obtained in a 1MHz, 2MHz and 3MHz flavor and they were designed so they could do one memory cycle each clock cycle or in other words, one byte each clock cycle. All of the data paths were 8 bit and the only thing that was 16 bit was the program counter. It was great fun to play with but it was best used for control applications and while my computer supported basic, it was no number cruncher.


C'mon... Back in the day, it was essentially three choices... 65xx, 68xx, or Z80 (or 8085). Well, of course, you had the 68K and the 8086/8, but, my family wasn't rich. I got stuck with the VIC-20.... In assembly, there were some knda cool games, and it could call BBSs, as long as they didn't expect you to have 40 or 80 columns.

Later, I did get a Vector 5005 (6 MHz Z80B, 192k of bank-switched RAM), multiuser CP/M (NOT MP/M). That thing had the most solid computer case I have EVER owned (and more solid that some enterprise systems I have managed and programmed over the years), and a really nice 18 slot S-100 backplane and the linear power supply from hell. A guy in Camarillo sold it to me for $50. The documentation back to the day of purchase that came with it showed, it was the former property of the Oxnard USD Admin office.
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Message 1553340 - Posted: 7 Aug 2014, 19:08:29 UTC - in response to Message 1469169.  
Last modified: 7 Aug 2014, 19:09:39 UTC

And, yes, that is a little kitty statue keeping watch over one of my rigs...LOL.


Okay, I just zoomed that, and have to ask... Are those top-reading nixies to the right of the motherboard, in what looks to be ceramic sockets? If so, what is the purpose? Just wondering what they are for. Vapor phase cooling, leet. Nixies add a real leet factor there ;)
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Message 1553553 - Posted: 8 Aug 2014, 6:36:26 UTC - in response to Message 1553340.  

LOL...no, no nixies in the computer.
Although the color in the pic does evoke their glow. Those are just some LED illuminated push button switches on the edge of the mobo.

I do own one of these, though.....

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Message 1553587 - Posted: 8 Aug 2014, 9:30:24 UTC - in response to Message 1553553.  
Last modified: 8 Aug 2014, 9:51:02 UTC

LOL...no, no nixies in the computer.
Although the color in the pic does evoke their glow. Those are just some LED illuminated push button switches on the edge of the mobo.

I do own one of these, though.....

I remember even earlier dekatrons, where the glowing athodes were arranged in a circle, 0-9, and guide cathodes in between could "increment" the glowing cathode quite simply -- a counting circuit in a not-vacuum tube.
Anyway, to illustrate what I've been posting in the low power thread, here are a couple of shots of my Jetson development kit, before and after adding an external SSD.
(Sorry, embedding the images didn't work for some reason, so you'll have to click on the lynx.)
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Message 1554401 - Posted: 9 Aug 2014, 21:45:02 UTC - in response to Message 1553587.  
Last modified: 9 Aug 2014, 21:46:08 UTC

LOL...no, no nixies in the computer.
Although the color in the pic does evoke their glow. Those are just some LED illuminated push button switches on the edge of the mobo.

I do own one of these, though.....

I remember even earlier dekatrons, where the glowing athodes were arranged in a circle, 0-9, and guide cathodes in between could "increment" the glowing cathode quite simply -- a counting circuit in a not-vacuum tube.
Anyway, to illustrate what I've been posting in the low power thread, here are a couple of shots of my Jetson development kit, before and after adding an external SSD.
(Sorry, embedding the images didn't work for some reason, so you'll have to click on the lynx.)


Ivan,

How many of those pins are GPIO, and how many are i2c and SPI? I haven't found the docs on that yet.

The price is certainly right.

That sounds like a seriously cool board. Raspberry Pi has it's uses, but this sounds like it's useful for more than just home automation stuff done on the cheap (Raspberry Pi B+ for $35 is really hard to beat).
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Message 1554423 - Posted: 9 Aug 2014, 23:13:51 UTC - in response to Message 1553553.  

I do own one of these, though.....


That's cool Mark where can i get 1 i need a clock for the lounge and i love this go retro "yeh baby"
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Message 1554426 - Posted: 9 Aug 2014, 23:20:16 UTC - in response to Message 1554423.  
Last modified: 9 Aug 2014, 23:29:31 UTC

I do own one of these, though.....


That's cool Mark where can i get 1 i need a clock for the lounge and i love this go retro "yeh baby"

I don't believe the gentleman that produced the Nixiechron sells them any longer.
Jeff Thomas did a really nice job when designing them. I always was fascinated by nixie tubes.

The large Russian made IN-18 nixies used for this clock are now over $200.00 for a set of 6.

If you do a search for nixie clock, I suspect there are some variations available from other sources.

EDIT...
A quick look turned up a fellow that does appear to still make a IN-18 clock.
Kosbo.com
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Message 1555069 - Posted: 11 Aug 2014, 14:00:42 UTC - in response to Message 1554401.  

Anyway, to illustrate what I've been posting in the low power thread, here are a couple of shots of my Jetson development kit, before and after adding an external SSD.

How many of those pins are GPIO, and how many are i2c and SPI? I haven't found the docs on that yet.

You should be able to get to the Jetson TK1 Support page. The PM375 Module Specification document gives the names of all the pins; I haven't found a more-verbose description yet but the schematics are there too, if you can read them. Note there are several other interfaces brought out here too, such as LVDS for an LCD panel, touch input, etc.

The price is certainly right.

That sounds like a seriously cool board. Raspberry Pi has it's uses, but this sounds like it's useful for more than just home automation stuff done on the cheap (Raspberry Pi B+ for $35 is really hard to beat).

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Message 1555210 - Posted: 11 Aug 2014, 19:07:20 UTC - in response to Message 1554426.  

I do own one of these, though.....


That's cool Mark where can i get 1 i need a clock for the lounge and i love this go retro "yeh baby"

I don't believe the gentleman that produced the Nixiechron sells them any longer.
Jeff Thomas did a really nice job when designing them. I always was fascinated by nixie tubes.

The large Russian made IN-18 nixies used for this clock are now over $200.00 for a set of 6.

If you do a search for nixie clock, I suspect there are some variations available from other sources.

EDIT...
A quick look turned up a fellow that does appear to still make a IN-18 clock.
Kosbo.com


http://www.kosbo.com/iv11clock/
http://www.kosbo.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=72&Itemid=79
http://www.kosbo.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=53&Itemid=61
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