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Message 1465756 - Posted: 18 Jan 2014, 13:25:37 UTC

Computers & Technology

Same rules as before, discuss the post/technology, not the poster.

Interesting psychology......

Fake security messages more believable than real ones
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Message 1466654 - Posted: 20 Jan 2014, 15:07:40 UTC - in response to Message 1465756.  

Fake security messages more believable than real ones

Halfway through reading the article, a big banner popped up, obscuring the screen, saying:
TechRepublic is for IT professionals
-Avoid mistakes that make you look dumb.
-Discover software that will get you promoted.
SIGN ME UP NOW
No thanks, I don't want to stay on top of my game.


Oh the irony!
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Message 1467282 - Posted: 22 Jan 2014, 14:02:07 UTC

How long do we wait for this to become mainstream?

1.4 terabits per second
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Message 1467298 - Posted: 22 Jan 2014, 14:50:31 UTC - in response to Message 1467289.  

That was a once off special experiment between the BT Tower in central London, and the BT Research labs at Martlesham in Suffolk. It is quite understandably unlikely to be commercially available for some years.


That was quite obvious in the link.

"But the breakthrough is being seen as highly important for internet service providers (ISPs), as it means a greater amount of information can be sent through existing broadband infrastructure, reducing the need for costly upgrades."

So why the wait?

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Message 1467300 - Posted: 22 Jan 2014, 14:54:02 UTC
Last modified: 22 Jan 2014, 14:55:00 UTC

They only published the test yesterday, have some patience.
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Message 1467303 - Posted: 22 Jan 2014, 14:58:36 UTC - in response to Message 1467300.  

I realise that but as it's BT who seem to want to be Sky's main competitor with their BT Sports channel.

It would be far better to spend that money on rolling out their advances in technology.
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Message 1467337 - Posted: 22 Jan 2014, 16:32:33 UTC

If some company said it had trialed a hybrid truck, (the prius of the commercial world), how long would it be before you would be using it on the road.
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Message 1467338 - Posted: 22 Jan 2014, 16:37:41 UTC - in response to Message 1467337.  

If some company said it had trialed a hybrid truck, (the prius of the commercial world), how long would it be before you would be using it on the road.


Not that long due to this.....

"reducing the need for costly upgrades."

It is not like it all has to be started again from scratch. The infrastructure is already in place, just needs upgrading, the same for that hybrid truck.

From the statements made in that report, it could be many years before it becomes mainstream. All I was asking was why?
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Message 1467342 - Posted: 22 Jan 2014, 16:58:26 UTC - in response to Message 1467338.  

If some company said it had trialed a hybrid truck, (the prius of the commercial world), how long would it be before you would be using it on the road.


Not that long due to this.....

"reducing the need for costly upgrades."

It is not like it all has to be started again from scratch. The infrastructure is already in place, just needs upgrading, the same for that hybrid truck.

From the statements made in that report, it could be many years before it becomes mainstream. All I was asking was why?

I can only assume that they are what we electronics people call the breadboard level, where the idea has been implemented using 10's of chips. The end product would probably only use on or two chips. And at this stage they probably don't even know what the power supply requirements are for the final product.
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Message 1467405 - Posted: 22 Jan 2014, 19:12:28 UTC - in response to Message 1467350.  

What we have here is a technology journalist grabbing a headline to make a living, and some people over reacting.


Oh Dear.....

Alcatel-Lucent & BT won't like that comment.

"There are faster methods of transmitting data - such as the use of complex laser technology - but this is the first test to achieve such high speeds in "real world" conditions, outside testing labs.

The high speeds were achieved using existing fibre cable technology that has already been installed in much of the UK and other parts of the world."
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Message 1467413 - Posted: 22 Jan 2014, 19:29:36 UTC - in response to Message 1467338.  
Last modified: 22 Jan 2014, 19:46:16 UTC

If some company said it had trialed a hybrid truck, (the prius of the commercial world), how long would it be before you would be using it on the road.


Not that long due to this.....

"reducing the need for costly upgrades."

It is not like it all has to be started again from scratch. The infrastructure is already in place, just needs upgrading, the same for that hybrid truck.

From the statements made in that report, it could be many years before it becomes mainstream. All I was asking was why?

We've had multi-Tbit/s optical fibre comms using DWDM over existing old fibre infrastructure for well over a decade now. Just look at some of the dates on the summary: [Fibre Optic] Data rates

And Scandinavian countries have had GIGA-bit internet to many homes for years now...

So why not here?

Why are we being lead down the garden path of ADSL over centuries-old telegraph poles? The 'new' fibre-to-the-cabinet is going to trap all those afflicted to Mbit speeds whilst the rest of the world progresses to multi-GIGA bits for pretty much the same costs.

Note that a 1 GIGA-bit fibre-optic modem suitable to connect you back to even a distant telephone exchange building can be had for as little as £40.


So why are we still suffering languishing with old arcane electrical telephone signals for mere Mega-bits?... (When you're in luck and when it isn't raining and when noone else is using the same bundle of old wires... :-( )

I've recently connected two buildings together with 10 Gbit/s using fibre for 1/50th the cost of what a certain elephant was wanting to charge for a leased line... Can be done if you know your stuff. If you don't, it looks like a certain elephant was very happy to try stuffing us on that one... Scary for what likely happens elsewhere around the country...


Going to Giga-bit speeds really is a game changer. And it should not be any more expensive than what we presently endure for the meager Mbit speeds in the UK... But how to convince the Marketing managers that no they cannot charge x1000 the price for what is now old-tech?...

IT is what we make it...
Martin


Note: 1 Tbit = 1000 Gbit = 1000 000 Mbit
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Message 1467417 - Posted: 22 Jan 2014, 19:38:52 UTC - in response to Message 1467413.  

Thanks Martin. That was an answer to my question which was what I was looking for.

From your link: -

"The distance over which this is possible is large enough to bridge the Atlantic or the Pacific Ocean."...

...and the UK is nowhere near that large!

Makes one wonder WHY that technology journalist didn't ask the same question!
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Message 1467423 - Posted: 22 Jan 2014, 19:50:53 UTC - in response to Message 1467417.  
Last modified: 22 Jan 2014, 19:51:41 UTC

Thanks Martin. That was an answer to my question which was what I was looking for.

From your link: -

"The distance over which this is possible is large enough to bridge the Atlantic or the Pacific Ocean."...

...and the UK is nowhere near that large!

Makes one wonder WHY that technology journalist didn't ask the same question!

Especially so for here at 'home':

28 Marconi
World's Longest High-Speed Fibre Optic Communications Link Begins Transmission.
Marconi, press release 19. December 2002 (1.6 Tbit/s over 3000 km).



I guess there has just not been the 'incentive' to progress...

All a game of Monopoly?...

IT is what we make it...
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Message 1467437 - Posted: 22 Jan 2014, 20:20:39 UTC - in response to Message 1467423.  


I guess there has just not been the 'incentive' to progress...

All a game of Monopoly?...


After a decade & more of achieving that speed, it has to be the only conclusion left as to why we do not have it as the "normal" speed.
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Message 1467646 - Posted: 23 Jan 2014, 12:40:36 UTC - in response to Message 1467636.  

... To upgrade the UK to FTTP across the country would cost billions which at present doesn't cost in...

There is a good joke that the scrap value of the vast bundles of copper telephone cables choking up all the roadside ducts is greater than the cost of replacing them with a much more slimline yet vastly more capable fibre-optic infrastructure.

You then also get the advantage that all services (and new services) can be fed to homes/premises all down the one fibre.


So, why not?... From my experience, I'm sure it ain't cost...

(And how many years were BT able to delay "Local Loop Unbundling" to allow a minor bit of competition to creep in?...)


IT is what we allow it to be...
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Message 1467660 - Posted: 23 Jan 2014, 13:08:40 UTC

Personally i find normal copper-wire broadband more than sufficient. I don't know whether the cabinet is linked to fibre-optic or not, but i consistently get 18 Mb download, sometimes up to 25 Mb, which is easily capable of everything i need it for.

One day it may not be, then i'll look at upgrading to fibre-optic or whatever new technology may have come along.

I expect that fibre-optic technology will gradually take over at the rate people require it, so the upgrade will be an ongoing process requiring a trickle of money, rather than one massive rollout which would require a significant chunk of investment, possibly more than the current financial climate would handle.

I know the university i work at has it's own fibre-optic connection, though it also has upward of 3000 computers so that's easily justified, but to a residential home i can't see the extra cost being justifiable ... yet!
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Message 1467731 - Posted: 23 Jan 2014, 15:29:26 UTC - in response to Message 1467661.  
Last modified: 23 Jan 2014, 15:30:29 UTC

(And how many years were BT able to delay "Local Loop Unbundling" to allow a minor bit of competition to creep in?...)

I can tell you here and now from first hand knowledge, that people have far more problems in South London from Cable companies than they have from BT.

You have forgotten to mention your connections to the religion of employment by BT...

IT is what we allow it...
Martin


(Apologies to others for the bad puns!)
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Message 1467743 - Posted: 23 Jan 2014, 16:03:53 UTC - in response to Message 1467661.  

(And how many years were BT able to delay "Local Loop Unbundling" to allow a minor bit of competition to creep in?...)

I can tell you here and now from first hand knowledge, that people have far more problems in South London from Cable companies than they have from BT.


They are all as bad or as good as each other, as seen from the horse's mouth itself.....

B.T. Complaints

Nice way to treat one's customers

Hilarious

"We could not hear the caller then the line went dead. This went on for months while various engineers tried to fix it. The fault was eventually found to be at the exchange"

Nice engineers, says a lot for B.T.'s standards!
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Message 1467755 - Posted: 23 Jan 2014, 16:50:37 UTC - in response to Message 1467740.  

If you are on cable I simply don't know what the average speeds are. From standard BT Broadband you get up to 8-12Mb download, above that would be FTTC and Infinity.

I'm with Plusnet, who strangely only claim to offer broadband up to 16 Mb, but in practice mine runs notably quicker. But then my house is 10 yards from the cabinet so maybe that helps.
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Message 1469289 - Posted: 26 Jan 2014, 21:37:27 UTC - in response to Message 1467413.  
Last modified: 26 Jan 2014, 21:37:51 UTC

... So why are we still suffering languishing with old arcane electrical telephone signals for mere Mega-bits?... (When you're in luck and when it isn't raining and when noone else is using the same bundle of old wires... :-( )

[...]

Going to Giga-bit speeds really is a game changer. And it should not be any more expensive than what we presently endure for the meager Mbit speeds in the UK... But how to convince the Marketing managers that no they cannot charge x1000 the price for what is now old-tech?...



Note: 1 Tbit = 1000 Gbit = 1000 000 Mbit

There's domestic Gigabit to be had in a few places in the USA:

Where in America Can You Get Gigabit Internet (Right Now)?



IT is what we make it...
Martin
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Take a look for yourself: Linux Format
The Future is what We all make IT (GPLv3)
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Message boards : Politics : Computers & Technology 2


 
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