Normal Operations (May 30 2007)

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Message 579069 - Posted: 31 May 2007, 8:54:20 UTC - in response to Message 579067.  

Has any one else noticed that the "User of the Day" hasn't changed since all of this began.

Yeah, same over on SETI Beta, I think the part that changes this in the script is probably down. Since its not a "urgent" thing to fix, it will probably be on the back burner till they get the important stuff taken care of.

Has anyone else checked their results? I'm supposed to have 5 in progress I've only got 2, have I completed the other 3?

If your talking about the ones from the 23rd of May that show to have been sent to you that you don't have, that was during the time that the servers were having problems, and lots of people got "ghost" work units. I wouldn't worry about it, they will get re-issued if needed. :-)

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Message 579113 - Posted: 31 May 2007, 11:57:58 UTC - in response to Message 578942.  
Last modified: 31 May 2007, 12:00:46 UTC

Actually, I kind of like the "i" plural endings - they remind me of my Italian (and, hence, Latin) roots... "Octopus" and "virus" (and "index"!) are Latin words, so the "i" ending is somewhat better, if you want people to remember the words' derivation. (although, by now, they are also correct as "-es") (the proper Latin plural of "virus" is actually "viri" - one "I". You only replace the "us" with an "i"...)

Wrong and wrong—“a little knowledge is a dangerous thing”. Not all Latin words ending in -us form their plurals in -i. For examples of some others that don’t, and are reasonably familar adoptees in English, try apparatus, coitus, corpus, genus, hiatus, impetus, prospectus, opus, and status for starters.

“Octopus” was originally Greek, and was borrowed into Latin before being passed on to us. The Greek plural was oktopodes (four syllables) and the Latin octopedes (ditto)—cf. “tripod” and “pedal” respectively. If you want to pay homage to our classical forebears, feel free to use one of those forms, but I think you’ll find most authorities recommend “octopuses”.

As for virus, we have the problem that there’s no surviving evidence of its plural usage in classical or mediæval Latin. Opinion appears to be divided on how it should be classified: some say it had no plural in use, period (how often do you say “poisonousnesses”?); others think it would have behaved like certain other neuter nouns in -us, indicating the form virora—cf. corpus, corpora—while others still put it in the fourth declension, where its plural would be simply virus (with a long U, to rhyme with “igloos”). At any rate, the only unexceptionable English plural is “viruses”.

Sorry to go on so long OT, but: a) I didn’t start it; b) Latin-abuse is one of my pet peeves; c) blame Misfit.



I suppose it depends on where you are from and how it was explained in class, I always use octopi as a plural form ( not that it comes up much in general conversation) no plural for fish so hearing fishes makes me laugh unless it comes from a 3 year old, viruses well thats debatable, I would guess it would depend on the usage of the word depending on if you were describing a multiplying virus of a given name (viri) or generalizing as in saying there are lots of viruses going around at the moment.

It's not worth getting picky about but what would I know.

Crikey I digressed from why I came to this thread, please forgive me (strong like bull smart like tractor)
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Message 579123 - Posted: 31 May 2007, 12:09:28 UTC

Well done guys, just need to find ET now....or has this already happened.....
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Message 579157 - Posted: 31 May 2007, 13:15:47 UTC

Well done guys!! Thanks for all of your hard work and sacrifices keeping the project running.
An ant on the move does more than a dozing ox.

- Lao Tzu
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Message 579174 - Posted: 31 May 2007, 13:45:52 UTC - in response to Message 579067.  
Last modified: 31 May 2007, 13:50:26 UTC

Has any one else noticed that the "User of the Day" hasn't changed since all of this began.

Yeah, same over on SETI Beta, I think the part that changes this in the script is probably down. Since its not a "urgent" thing to fix, it will probably be on the back burner till they get the important stuff taken care of.

Has anyone else checked their results? I'm supposed to have 5 in progress I've only got 2, have I completed the other 3?


You probably have a few "ghost" WU's, that were created in the May 17-23 range, but were never actually sent out, due to the server woes... check on your "Your Results" button... these will get re-sent to someone else when the deadline expires. (yeah, I've got a few, also...) This is also, BTW, why the "number of WU's in progress" on the "Server Status" page is about a million WU's high... (normally, b4 the outage, it was in the 1.4-1.8 million range...)

While you are on the SETI website, check your cache, if you have changed it from default, as it's probably back at default. (0.1 days) Re-set it, if necessary.
.

Hello, from Albany, CA!...
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Message 579192 - Posted: 31 May 2007, 14:49:04 UTC

Sorry to maintain the strange OT...
I'm from Italy, very nice discussion about "plurals", here in italy we made a similar mistake with the plurals of imported words, like film (movie in italian) or killer. It is undoubtely an error to use those words in plural form in an italian phrase, we can't say films, even if we refer to a lot of movies. But some people, to show their perfect english, do it...

P.S. Virus means 'poison' in Latin.

PP.S. My WUs now are happily crunched again!!

Ciao
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Message 579237 - Posted: 31 May 2007, 16:45:06 UTC - in response to Message 578901.  
Last modified: 31 May 2007, 16:46:41 UTC

To original poster quoted: "Indexes" and "Indicies" are both correct.

aren't grammar flames on these boards full of balonii?

congrats on getting things flowing again, Matt and Gang. Also thanks to all the hubbub over the past month I've leaned a little more about the software I've been running while helping S@H. for the first time since i started, i went in and modified the default settings. now, under normal conditions, i have a running queue of WUs that should be large enough to weather the typical tuesday maintenance outage.
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Message 579291 - Posted: 31 May 2007, 19:27:37 UTC

I see this message on "List of recently connected client types" page:
Warning: filemtime() [function.filemtime]: stat failed for /home/boincadm/projects/sah/log_galileo/connection_counts.out in /disks/setifiler1/home/boincadm/projects/sah/html/user/client_types.php on line 11
last updated: December 31 1969 16:00:00.
Is this a serious error? I hope not...

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Message 579293 - Posted: 31 May 2007, 19:31:20 UTC - in response to Message 578642.  

So by "mystified" I didn't mean "we didn't understand" as much as "we were confounded by irrational behavior."


Things do get challenging when critical systems exhibit all the consistency of cafeteria oatmeal.

Thanks for the update, and the team's collective efforts.

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Message 579309 - Posted: 31 May 2007, 20:13:41 UTC - in response to Message 579001.  

Has any one else noticed that the "User of the Day" hasn't changed since all of this began.


Yeah, I've certainly had more than my alotted 15 minutes of fame! However, it has generated some nice private messages, including one from a friend I haven't heard from in a number of years.


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Message 579607 - Posted: 1 Jun 2007, 5:41:07 UTC - in response to Message 578942.  

Actually, I kind of like the "i" plural endings - they remind me of my Italian (and, hence, Latin) roots... "Octopus" and "virus" (and "index"!) are Latin words, so the "i" ending is somewhat better, if you want people to remember the words' derivation. (although, by now, they are also correct as "-es") (the proper Latin plural of "virus" is actually "viri" - one "I". You only replace the "us" with an "i"...)


Wrong and wrong—“a little knowledge is a dangerous thing”. Not all Latin words ending in -us form their plurals in -i. For examples of some others that don’t, and are reasonably familar adoptees in English, try apparatus, coitus, corpus, genus, hiatus, impetus, prospectus, opus, and status for starters.


I do hear the occasional "apparati" (long "I") bandied about... (I live next to Berkeley...) but how often do you speak of multiple coituses, opuses, hiatuses, prospectuses, or stati (I had to throw one in... ;-) )

“Octopus” was originally Greek, and was borrowed into Latin before being passed on to us. The Greek plural was oktopodes (four syllables) and the Latin octopedes (ditto)—cf. “tripod” and “pedal” respectively. If you want to pay homage to our classical forebears, feel free to use one of those forms, but I think you’ll find most authorities recommend “octopuses”.


My source (The American Heritage dictionary, 2nd College Edition, 1982) gives Latin as the derivation for "octopus"... It may have started as Greek, but the Romans took it over, and it's form is (now) Latin. The Romans certainly knew the critters, and depicted them in quite a few surviving pictures.

As for virus, we have the problem that there’s no surviving evidence of its plural usage in classical or mediæval Latin. Opinion appears to be divided on how it should be classified: some say it had no plural in use, period (how often do you say “poisonousnesses”?); others think it would have behaved like certain other neuter nouns in -us, indicating the form virora—cf. corpus, corpora—while others still put it in the fourth declension, where its plural would be simply virus (with a long U, to rhyme with “igloos”). At any rate, the only unexceptionable English plural is “viruses”.


Umm, my source (same as above) says that virus is Latin for "poison" - one certainly speaks of "poisons"!

Sorry to go on so long OT, but: a) I didn’t start it; b) Latin-abuse is one of my pet peeves; c) blame Misfit.

[/quote]

.

Hello, from Albany, CA!...
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Message 579734 - Posted: 1 Jun 2007, 12:59:31 UTC - in response to Message 579607.  

... but how often do you speak of multiple ...

Of one or the one or many sheep?...

:-p
Martin

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Message 580640 - Posted: 3 Jun 2007, 6:31:56 UTC - in response to Message 579607.  

I do hear the occasional "apparati" (long "I") bandied about... (I live next to Berkeley...) but how often do you speak of multiple coituses, opuses, hiatuses, prospectuses, or stati (I had to throw one in... ;-) )

Not often, for most of them, which is probably why the correct forms aren’t well known. But surely you’ve heard of “opera”?

“Octopus” was originally Greek, and was borrowed into Latin before being passed on to us. The Greek plural was oktopodes (four syllables) and the Latin octopedes (ditto)—cf. “tripod” and “pedal” respectively. If you want to pay homage to our classical forebears, feel free to use one of those forms, but I think you’ll find most authorities recommend “octopuses”.

My source (The American Heritage dictionary, 2nd College Edition, 1982) gives Latin as the derivation for "octopus"... It may have started as Greek, but the Romans took it over, and it's form is (now) Latin. The Romans certainly knew the critters, and depicted them in quite a few surviving pictures.

That’s why I gave both forms. Regardless of the etymology, the plural does not end in -i in Latin: “feet” is pedes, not *pi.

As for virus, we have the problem that there’s no surviving evidence of its plural usage in classical or mediæval Latin. Opinion appears to be divided on how it should be classified: some say it had no plural in use, period (how often do you say “poisonousnesses”?); […]

Umm, my source (same as above) says that virus is Latin for "poison" - one certainly speaks of "poisons"![/quote]
Apparently the Romans didn’t, at least not using that word.

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