Serfing the waves of Medieval Times


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Profile Sarge
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Message 1157602 - Posted: 30 Sep 2011, 22:13:09 UTC

"Sometimes I wonder whether the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on or by imbeciles who really mean it." - attributed to to Mark Twain

Message 1157613 - Posted: 30 Sep 2011, 23:02:49 UTC - in response to Message 1157602.

Mark Twain was one of The Worst Business Men of his era. He was a Smart Man and An Imbecile in Business.

He is Great for Quotes.

Yes, I read a Biography of Sammy Boy.

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Message 1158004 - Posted: 1 Oct 2011, 20:30:18 UTC

"Class warfare? Ha! Try serfing the waves of Medieval Times!" -Sarge

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Message 1158126 - Posted: 2 Oct 2011, 3:12:20 UTC - in response to Message 1158004.

we're kinda working our way back to serfs and lords all over again aren't we.
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Profile Chris SProject donor
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Message 1158172 - Posted: 2 Oct 2011, 8:54:09 UTC

I think I might agree a little bit there!

Cottagers - Underclass
Serfs, villeins = Workng class
Freemen - Middle class
Land Lords - Upper Class
Barons, Knights - Aristocracy

Added to which we could add Nouveau Rich for Bankers, which they didn't have then! Me, I'm a born again Scutifer!

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Message 1158489 - Posted: 3 Oct 2011, 13:21:10 UTC - in response to Message 1158172.

I think I might agree a little bit there!

Cottagers - Underclass
Serfs, villeins = Workng class
Freemen - Middle class
Land Lords - Upper Class
Barons, Knights - Aristocracy

Added to which we could add Nouveau Rich for Bankers, which they didn't have then! Me, I'm a born again Scutifer!


You forgot to mention...Seti-ites, us who are watching them all very closely.

Villeins who due to the medieval village uprisings became known as villans, So you
now know where this term "Villans" came from that we use sometimes to describe naughty persons.

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Message 1158520 - Posted: 3 Oct 2011, 15:58:03 UTC

Not quite right Michael, but there is a definite link yes.

Villain comes from the Anglo-French and Old French vilein, which itself descends from the Late Latin word villanus, meaning "farmhand", in the sense of someone who is bound to the soil of a villa, which is to say, worked on the equivalent of a plantation in Late Antiquity, in Italy or Gaul. It referred to a person of less than knightly status and so came to mean a person who was not chivalrous. As a result of many unchivalrous acts, such as treachery or rape, being considered villainous in the modern sense of the word, it became used as a term of abuse and eventually took on its modern meaning.


You forgot to mention...Seti-ites, us who are watching them all very closely.

We would be the scribes of the time writing it all down.

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Message 1158616 - Posted: 3 Oct 2011, 20:43:51 UTC - in response to Message 1158520.
Last modified: 3 Oct 2011, 21:35:27 UTC

Not quite right Michael, but there is a definite link yes.

[quote]Villain comes from the Anglo-French and Old French vilein, which itself descends from the Late Latin word villanus, meaning "farmhand", in the sense of someone who is bound to the soil of a villa, which is to say, worked on the equivalent of a plantation in Late Antiquity, in Italy or Gaul. It referred to a person of less than knightly status and so came to mean a person who was not chivalrous. As a result of many unchivalrous acts, such as treachery or rape, being considered villainous in the modern sense of the word, it became used as a term of abuse and eventually took on its modern meaning.


In the report regarding the peasant uprisings involving those living in the village, villains and serfs meant the same thing. Villaining was used to describe those involved in this revolt but not their acts of defiance though. So if you were a protester this was termed as villaining I suspect because you were against the restrictions placed upon you as a villager by your local lord. My understanding is still that the English derived their term "villans" from this uprising since this term does not seem to have been used in this country prior to this event occuring. Got any old Roman manuscripts laying around Chris that cover their occupation of the UK if so may shine more light on this subject.

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