Bring Back Caning In Schools?


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Profile Chris SProject donor
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Message 1152718 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 11:48:10 UTC

An emphatic NO is my answer to caning!

In the 1950's if we misbehaved in class it was either the slipper on the backside, or the ruler across the palm. All they did was sting, the real hurt was the embarrassment of it being done in front of the whole class. That was the real deterrent. Caning was in the pre WWII era and that did leave welts if done too hard.

I'm not surprised that a significant number of parents support the idea of bringing this back, the reason being that they lack the parenting skills themselves to discipline their kids. If kids are brought up properly, taught the difference between right and wrong, and what is acceptable behaviour, there wouldn't be so much need for discipline in schools in the first place.

The job of a teacher is to educate, it is NOT to be a surrogate parent. Although of course whilst in school they have the legal responsibility of in loco parentis. The first kid to get the cane will claim it's against his human rights. I sometimes think people should have to apply for a licence to have kids.

Corporal punishment

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Message 1152729 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 12:37:04 UTC - in response to Message 1152718.

I sometimes think people should have to apply for a licence to have kids.

Like in China?

Profile Chris SProject donor
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Message 1152737 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 13:09:21 UTC
Last modified: 16 Sep 2011, 13:10:46 UTC

I assume that you mean Chinas' one child policy.

The one-child policy (simplified Chinese: 计划生育政策; traditional Chinese: 計劃生育政策; pinyin: jìhuà shēngyù zhèngcè; literally "policy of birth planning") refers to the one-child limitation applying to a minority of families in the population control policy of the People's Republic of China

I didn't mean that. I meant by virtue of being judged able to be good parents, not restricted by numbers. Wasn't there a Sci Fi story about a future society where you could only have kids by permission from the state?

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Message 1152759 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 14:24:45 UTC - in response to Message 1152718.

The job of a teacher is to educate, it is NOT to be a surrogate parent.


In loco parentis?
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I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that ...

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Message 1152781 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 15:09:08 UTC

The job of a teacher is to teach, not to replace the parents. Neither school are a depot, where parents just drop their kids because they don’t have any other place to put them while they work.
Parent’s role is to educate, a teacher role is to teach. Let’s not mix things as these are two different things.
I’m a parent, and there is no manual that will say how to be one, but I always separated things, at home me and my wife, we educate our kids, at school they learn.
Bottom line is that the role of a parent is different from the role of a teacher, and if parents do not know this, then Chris,I must agree with you, in the limit, parents should have authorization to have kids.
To make a child is easy; to raise one is very difficult.

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Message 1152835 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 17:12:20 UTC

'Spare the rod and spoil the child.........'
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Message 1152839 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 17:23:49 UTC

@Mark - in principle yes.

@Bobby - That is the correct definition of in loco parentis. In the UK, Schools and Colleges have to ensure by law, that they safeguard pupils physical safety and moral well-being whilst they are on School or College premises. The drawback of course is making them wear goggles when playing conkers in the playground, in case a get rich quick parent sues for eye injury.

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Message 1152860 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 18:42:26 UTC - in response to Message 1152781.
Last modified: 16 Sep 2011, 19:05:48 UTC

To make a child is easy; to raise one is very difficult.


Correct Dr Imaginario.

Sheila and I brought up 3 children - boy (now 41), girl (now 38) and a boy (now 35).

I believe we did so adequately, and aside from smacking the eldest ONCE only around the age of 10 we did not physically punish any of them.

If I was able to communicate with my 18 to 22 year old self now, with the knowledge and attitudes I now live with, I would probably still be single. My reason? All women I would have courted, and, perhaps, married would be under no illusion that I would want the responsibility and worry of bringing up children again. They are not worth the trauma and trouble they bring during their formative years. They are great as mature adults.
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Message 1152873 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 20:23:33 UTC - in response to Message 1152835.

'Spare the rod and spoil the child.........'


Alternatively, "While punishment may be of limited value in consistently influencing rule-related behavior, non-punitive techniques have been found to have greater impact on children".

Seems writers of the bible did not rely on scientific methods and research prior to authoring Proverbs. We can do better now.
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I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that ...

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Message 1152874 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 20:31:41 UTC
Last modified: 16 Sep 2011, 20:32:16 UTC

Perhaps use a little JUSTICE? Both in the Schools, On Buses And More Parenting at Home. JMHO
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Message 1152884 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 20:56:05 UTC
Last modified: 16 Sep 2011, 20:56:23 UTC

Children are born into communities.

"It takes a village to raise a child." Nigerian proverb.

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Message 1152886 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 20:59:46 UTC - in response to Message 1152884.

Children are born into communities.

"It takes a village to raise a child." Nigerian proverb.


Very TRUE. But one Must know the Village.?
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Message 1152904 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 21:44:05 UTC

Children are born into communities.


Children are born into families. That family in turn, may or may not, choose to be part of their local community. The point that I want to make here is that, if the majority of parents brought their kids up properly, there wouldn't be this discussion about bringing back corporal punishment in schools in the first place.

In the 1950's we got the slipper just for talking in class. Can you or anyone else see a young yob putting up with that for being found carrying a knife?

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Message 1152915 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 22:06:54 UTC - in response to Message 1152904.

Children are born into communities.


Children are born into families. That family in turn, may or may not, choose to be part of their local community. The point that I want to make here is that, if the majority of parents brought their kids up properly, there wouldn't be this discussion about bringing back corporal punishment in schools in the first place.


So it's the majority of parents that are at fault? If that's the case one wonders who defines "properly"?

In the 1950's we got the slipper just for talking in class. Can you or anyone else see a young yob putting up with that for being found carrying a knife?


I don't know why you would have put up with it in the 1950s, and I see no reason why anybody should today. That I've said it before, won't stop me from saying it again, teaching children that violent acts are the way to enforce leadership is not a valuable lesson.
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Message 1152926 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 22:39:33 UTC - in response to Message 1152915.
Last modified: 16 Sep 2011, 22:45:48 UTC

Children are born into communities.


Children are born into families. That family in turn, may or may not, choose to be part of their local community. The point that I want to make here is that, if the majority of parents brought their kids up properly, there wouldn't be this discussion about bringing back corporal punishment in schools in the first place.


So it's the majority of parents that are at fault? If that's the case one wonders who defines "properly"?

In the 1950's we got the slipper just for talking in class. Can you or anyone else see a young yob putting up with that for being found carrying a knife?


I don't know why you would have put up with it in the 1950s, and I see no reason why anybody should today. That I've said it before, won't stop me from saying it again, teaching children that violent acts are the way to enforce leadership is not a valuable lesson.

I Believe that there is a clear difference in Discipline and Teaching children violent acts are Proper, NO... "teaching children that violent acts are the way to enforce leadership is not a valuable lesson". Who would Teach such a thing and keep a Job in this "Politically Correct" World?
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Message 1152939 - Posted: 16 Sep 2011, 23:12:01 UTC - in response to Message 1152835.

Spare the child and spoil the rod, I have not sold myself to god.

Let the judical system cane away!!
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Message 1153026 - Posted: 17 Sep 2011, 4:26:08 UTC

Having seen the results of the can't discipline classroom ...

The child who now is in control of the teacher because they know all they do is falsely allege an iota of discipline and the teacher is fired.

Now you say where are the parents? After the child called CPS the last time they gave the kid a time out ...

Not every child responds to time outs and the evil eye. Once they lose the fear of punishment ...

I'm not in favor of the cane applied by the school system. I'm in favor of the school system teaching kids how to be parents. Especially because there are more and more single kid families so the kids don't see from an older perspective what their parents had to put up with and what works as they grew up.

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Message 1153030 - Posted: 17 Sep 2011, 4:56:53 UTC
Last modified: 17 Sep 2011, 5:20:38 UTC

It all depends on behavior of parents and surrounding street/community behavior but largely parents create their childrens behavior.

I guess it is time for EU to adopt this South Korean teacher's art of discipline:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xfE5KwKx9I

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hMTXnf7mnZI I am almost sure that most of asia and africa has this practice alive maybe eastern europe too.

But I think these are good start:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVbNnPJxgvY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpBeoYaqfCs

Oh this is what Chris actually meant:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqMt8gfacWc
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Message 1153052 - Posted: 17 Sep 2011, 6:35:23 UTC - in response to Message 1152915.

I don't know why you would have put up with it in the 1950s, and I see no reason why anybody should today. That I've said it before, won't stop me from saying it again, teaching children that violent acts are the way to enforce leadership is not a valuable lesson.


Don't you mean, "teaching children that violent acts are the way to enforce discipline, and not (leadership,) is not a valuable lesson

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Message 1153131 - Posted: 17 Sep 2011, 10:49:18 UTC
Last modified: 17 Sep 2011, 10:57:26 UTC

It is clear that 40-50 years ago more than 90% of teachers everywhere were like her: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaLhWMJk0VI <-china 2010.

oops indian colleges have that advanced method too: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87Z6_klWMw0
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