Boeing: Profits 1st, Safety 2nd? (Part 3)

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Message 2117917 - Posted: 19 Apr 2023, 14:08:57 UTC - in response to Message 2117912.  

Something to note - the "repair" procedure for these parts may be exactly the same as the "manufacturing" procedure. This isn't that uncommon where the part has to allow for a build-up of tolerances, and this is often achieved by the use of "fitted holes", shims or the like. The theory behind this goes along the lines "We know there will be the need to fit these parts so they install properly, be it during production, repair or overhaul, thus we will have one procedure to make sure the task is done consistently".
Take a part that has a hole that always has to be reamed out by 0.015 inch (+/- 0.002 inch) to fit and the supplier changes that hole so it only needs to be reamed by 0.005 inch (+/- 0.002 inch) then that part supplied does not conform to the OEM drawing, but, once fitted conforms to the required installation tolerance, but the installer is also not complying with the amount of material to be removed by the reaming. But the part, once installed, still complies with the overall fitting requirement.......
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Message 2118213 - Posted: 24 Apr 2023, 21:38:50 UTC
Last modified: 24 Apr 2023, 21:39:16 UTC

Are the investors getting twitchy?
Boeing investors seek answers after latest 737 production glitch

WASHINGTON, April 24 (Reuters) - Boeing Co (BA.N) is expected to reveal whether the latest 737 MAX manufacturing problem will derail the U.S. plane maker’s annual goals for passenger jet deliveries and free cash flow when it unveils its first quarter financial results on Wednesday.
Investors are clamoring for details on the extent of the problem, which Boeing said involves a “significant” portion of the 737 fleet where two brackets were improperly installed.


And did we miss this one in March, Boeing 767 freighter, KC-46 tanker face delivery snags due to fuel tank problem

WASHINGTON, March 7 (Reuters) - A new supplier problem has stymied deliveries of Boeing's (BA.N) 767 freighter and KC-46 tanker, the company confirmed on Tuesday.
According to a March 6 report by aviation publication The Air Current, Boeing has not delivered any 767-based jets in 2023 due to a quality issue surrounding the center fuel tank made by Triumph Group's (TGI.N) aerospace structures unit, which did not complete cleaning and paint adhesion processes before delivering the items.
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Message 2118215 - Posted: 24 Apr 2023, 21:57:40 UTC - in response to Message 2118213.  
Last modified: 24 Apr 2023, 22:00:38 UTC

Thanks for that catch.


Don't ya just luv the embarrassment jargon?!


... where two brackets were improperly installed...
... As opposed to openly explaining that those two brackets are a lot more than just the sort of brackets used to hold up bookshelves... As in, those two brackets are the aircraft tail fin forward attachment points for keeping the tail fin in place!


... did not complete cleaning and paint adhesion processes...
... As in pushed out the door uncleaned and unpainted?... For yet more Boeing FOD with that little extra of corrosion??...


Sheesh! High schoolers can do better!!

Fly safe??...
Martin


"FOD": Foreign Objects and Debris. Exactly the sort of left-over manufacturing rubbish you do not want left in your fuel tank, or pipework, or jammed into critical control cabling and flight equipment...
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Message 2118218 - Posted: 24 Apr 2023, 22:10:14 UTC - in response to Message 2118215.  

... did not complete cleaning and paint adhesion processes...
... As in pushed out the door uncleaned and unpainted?... For yet more Boeing FOD with that little extra of corrosion??

Fixed price contract on Air Force 1. What ya think?
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Message 2118687 - Posted: 3 May 2023, 13:18:32 UTC
Last modified: 3 May 2023, 13:19:09 UTC

The 'legacy' of 1960's equipment meeting the new world of 2023:


Air travel chaos looms as US keeps 5G altimeter refit deadline
wrote:
The US will not delay a deadline for airlines to refit planes with new sensors to address possible 5G interference, despite concerns the cut-off date could cause travel disruption...

... Phone companies have spent tens of billions of dollars upgrading their networks to deploy the 5G technology, which they say brings much faster internet services and greater connectivity.

Technology companies have said 5G is safe and have accused the aviation industry of fearmongering and distorting facts.

In the EU, networks operate at lower frequencies than those which US providers are planning to use - reducing the risk of interference. 5G masts can also operate at lower power.

Nevertheless, some countries have taken further steps to reduce possible risks...

... the FAA on Tuesday proposed new rules for many Boeing aircraft due to the possibility of new 5G interference.

The proposed rules affect nearly 20,000 planes worldwide. They require revised flight manuals, bans on some landings, and new operating procedures for landings and approaches when dealing with 5G interference.

A representative for Boeing told Reuters that the company "continues to work ... and help mitigate operational restrictions where possible".



Meanwhile...

There is still the old Boeing 'legacy' of old indicator light bulbs instead of installing the now long standard ECAM/EICAS safety equipment to help pilots in the cockpit...


Fly safe?!...
Martin


See:

ECAM

EICAS

What are EICAS and ECAM Systems on Aircraft?

Why Boeing Doesn't Think The 737 MAX 10's Alerting System Needs Changes
wrote:
... Boeing's chief aerospace safety officer, Mike Delaney, expressed that there is no data that shows that switching to another alerting system is safer...

... two crashes happened within six months of each other, one in Ethiopia and the other off the coast of Indonesia. At the time, concerns arose about the safety of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, and the aircraft ended up being grounded for 20 months...

... facing a battle to certify the largest variant of its 737 MAX fleet before a new cockpit alert safety standard takes effect. New deadlines were put in place as part of reforms from the FAA following the two MAX crashes...

... The current design on the 737[s] is a 1960s era design, and experts are worried about Boeing not updating the warning system...

... The Boeing 737 aircraft, unlike other aircraft manufactured by Boeing, are not equipped with the Engine Indicating and Crew Alerting System (EICAS)...

... "It is amazing that one of the world's most populous commercial aircraft, that may be in service through the 2060s, can be certified without a modern crew alerting system." ... modern crew alerting systems have existed and been placed on other aircraft for decades...

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Message 2118697 - Posted: 3 May 2023, 17:55:18 UTC - in response to Message 2118687.  

Why don't aircraft use lidar these days.

A professional system can be found, in an on-line search, for under $25,000. Would be more accurate too.
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Message 2118698 - Posted: 3 May 2023, 18:21:37 UTC - in response to Message 2118697.  

Why don't aircraft use lidar these days.

A professional system can be found, in an on-line search, for under $25,000. Would be more accurate too.

Is it certified for use in aircraft? No. What does it cost to certify it? More that the expected total worldwide sales.
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Message 2118699 - Posted: 3 May 2023, 18:23:30 UTC - in response to Message 2118687.  

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Message 2118700 - Posted: 3 May 2023, 19:38:01 UTC - in response to Message 2118698.  

Why don't aircraft use lidar these days.

A professional system can be found, in an on-line search, for under $25,000. Would be more accurate too.

Is it certified for use in aircraft? No. What does it cost to certify it? More that the expected total worldwide sales.

And that's the problem, so many times.
We wouldn't have the 737Max problem if certification wasn't so difficult and expensive.
Instead of designing a modern plane, Boeing kept an old certified design flying, that should have been retired decades ago.
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Message 2118709 - Posted: 4 May 2023, 0:50:54 UTC - in response to Message 2118700.  

Why don't aircraft use lidar these days.

A professional system can be found, in an on-line search, for under $25,000. Would be more accurate too.

Is it certified for use in aircraft? No. What does it cost to certify it? More that the expected total worldwide sales.

And that's the problem, so many times.
We wouldn't have the 737Max problem if certification wasn't so difficult and expensive.
Instead of designing a modern plane, Boeing kept an old certified design flying, that should have been retired decades ago.
Not Boeing, the GOVERNMENT! They write the certification standard.
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Message 2118717 - Posted: 4 May 2023, 5:10:02 UTC - in response to Message 2118709.  

Why don't aircraft use lidar these days.

A professional system can be found, in an on-line search, for under $25,000. Would be more accurate too.
Is it certified for use in aircraft? No. What does it cost to certify it? More that the expected total worldwide sales.
And that's the problem, so many times.
We wouldn't have the 737Max problem if certification wasn't so difficult and expensive.
Instead of designing a modern plane, Boeing kept an old certified design flying, that should have been retired decades ago.
Not Boeing, the GOVERNMENT! They write the certification standard.
And Donny cut a lot of them. ;-)
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Message 2118727 - Posted: 4 May 2023, 11:25:10 UTC - in response to Message 2118709.  

Not Boeing, the GOVERNMENT! They write the certification standard.

... And it is Boeing that play their silly games to "voodoo magic" around all the good standards to then kill people...


Oh wait...

Is that why we have minimum standards to be enforced?

And why Certification became a thing?


Fly safe?
Martin
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Message 2118730 - Posted: 4 May 2023, 11:37:29 UTC

Creeping certification :-(
Think Grenfell Tower

Probably better called lazy certification.
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Message 2118736 - Posted: 4 May 2023, 12:32:05 UTC - in response to Message 2118730.  

Worst of all, self certification.
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Message 2118737 - Posted: 4 May 2023, 12:59:18 UTC - in response to Message 2118736.  

Worst of all, self certification.
Right, I promise my income tax return is correct.
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Message 2118742 - Posted: 4 May 2023, 14:50:37 UTC - in response to Message 2118737.  

I'll audit for you...
That's right, hold it up to the screen, left a bit.

Yeah, that looks OK to me.
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Message 2120169 - Posted: 29 May 2023, 20:24:27 UTC

FAA Issues Airworthiness Directive To Prevent Loss Of Boeing 777 Horizontal Stabilizer.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued its latest airworthiness directive, which aims to prevent the potential loss of the Boeing 777's horizontal stabilizer and will require airline operators to conduct checks of all their 777s for potential cracking.

The directive will come into effect on June 30th and applies to all variants of Boeing's twinjet widebody aircraft, including the 777-200, 777-200ER, 777-200LR, 777-300ER, and 777F cargo aircraft. In a statement, the FAA explained the reason behind the airworthiness directive being issued, saying,

“The FAA is issuing this AD to address cracking in the STA 2370 pivot bulkhead forward outer chord. Such cracking, if not detected and corrected, could result in a severed pivot bulkhead outer chord, loss of horizontal stabilizer control, and loss of controllability of the airplane."

To illustrate the scale of the impact of this airworthiness directive, estimates show that there are currently more than 220 Boeing 777s registered in the US, while worldwide, over 1,600 have been built since 1994.....
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Message 2120318 - Posted: 2 Jun 2023, 18:41:43 UTC

Are we going to see more safety issues in the aircraft industry.

Know any airplane mechanics? A wave of retirements is leaving some US industries desperate to hire

The worrying line in this article is probably,
In the airline industry, more than one-third of mechanics are between 55 and 64, according to government data.
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Message 2120579 - Posted: 8 Jun 2023, 9:32:39 UTC

Say what?

Boeing accused in lawsuit of stealing trade secrets for NASA rocket.

Boeing was sued on Wednesday by a Colorado company that accused the aerospace giant of stealing trade secrets for NASA's Space Launch System rocket, and then building components with "critical" safety flaws that could endanger astronauts.

Wilson Aerospace said it worked with Boeing for two years starting in 2014 after Boeing, fearing the loss of billions of dollars of NASA revenue, sought its help in safely attaching engines to the rocket.

According to a complaint filed in Seattle federal court, Boeing then canceled Wilson's work on the project yet kept using its intellectual property without receiving "full instructions" on how to build and install it, creating safety risks.

"Boeing has captured billions of dollars in revenue because of the infringement of Wilson's trade secrets," and must turn over "all revenues and profits Boeing has obtained as a result," the complaint said.

Wilson also said Boeing stole trade secrets related to bolt installation tools for its 787 Dreamliner aircraft. It said Boeing had asked it to design the tools in 2012.....
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Message 2120899 - Posted: 14 Jun 2023, 10:56:50 UTC - in response to Message 2120579.  

Say what?

Boeing accused in lawsuit of stealing trade secrets for NASA rocket.

Wilson also said Boeing stole trade secrets related to bolt installation tools for its 787 Dreamliner aircraft. It said Boeing had asked it to design the tools in 2012.....
A bolt installation tool? Really? Do they still design and build airplanes, or is Boeing now just a holding company that has completely outsourced its engineering capacity? They are building airplanes by breaking down orders into sub-orders for the industry (which at least requires considerable management knowledge). From the delivered sub-orders... some miracles will happen at this point... a new airplane arises. When money is tight in such a situation, management begins to dig through the foul-smelling bag of tricks.
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Message boards : Politics : Boeing: Profits 1st, Safety 2nd? (Part 3)


 
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