Climate Change, 'Greenhouse' effects: Solutions #3

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Message 2115208 - Posted: 24 Feb 2023, 12:06:49 UTC - in response to Message 2115183.  
Last modified: 24 Feb 2023, 12:17:36 UTC

That’s the process by which electricity generated by wind turbines or solar arrays is added to the grid — the network of power lines and transformers that moves electricity from the spot where it is created to cities and factories. There is no single grid; the United States has dozens of electric networks, each overseen by a different authority.......
Is it so hard to get everyone together with a big map showing all the current projects that are approved and go from there instead of taking on each project 1 by 1 and likely winding up doing 1 upgrade on top of another?

If we can do it you can too. ;-)
Think ERCOT who is not interconnected to any other of the grids. Fifedoms. Lots of little big man. Every one a separate corporation in "competition" with each other. After all the more the more places to TAX! Cooperation is for commies and liberals not for maximizing PROFIT!

But ERCOT was already transformed into a public non-profit transmission grid operator (in Europe called: "TSO"). Operating transmission grid was separated from generating and selling energy. Who has an economic incentive to build interconnectors? ERCOT does not. It is the states, power plant, and generation capacity owners, electricity traders that have the incentive to invest into interconnectors to expand electricity market, thereby reducing their future costs.

In Europe also every country had its own big energy company (or four as in Germany) - state-owned or private. As ERCOT in Texas, regulation forces them to economically separate their grid operation from power plants business. Now all national transmission grids had to offer access to any electricity provider. Grid usage prices are regulated by law. Grid extension is planned by national TSOs and decided democratically by law. Extension is financed by loans, paid by customers through regulated grid usage fees. Nobody knows today whether this is an economically efficient solution to extend grids or whether it will waste billions of consumer's money.

But in contrast to the U.S. in (continental) Europe these national TSOs started early (first ones: CH, FR, and DE in 1958) to interconnect their networks to a continent-wide synchronous grid (as long as they operated their own power plants, larger grid meant: saving more money). Northern Europe operates a separate grid as North and Baltic Seas don't allow AC wiring in the past, as do British Isles, Ireland, Iceland. The advantage of our continent-wide grid; it's relatively inexpensive to add high-performance interconnects (two 400 kilovolt systems mounted on a single mast offer 4 GW). In case of non-synchronous grids, such as in North America (nine? non-synchronous grids in the U.S. and Canada), expensive HVDC coupling or thousands of miles of new HVDC lines are required. Anywhere, it'll take decades to technically restructure large transmission grids, no matter how much money one throws at it.
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Message 2115288 - Posted: 26 Feb 2023, 20:29:32 UTC

This farmer is certainly doing his bit and has raked his neighbours into it as well.

Timber shortage no issue for farmer who grew his own eco-friendly plantation and now reaps the rewards.

Ask Rowan Reid which is the best species of tree to plant and he'll give a wry smile and a surprising answer.

"I'm not really sure."

Four decades as a forester and a lifetime of planting farm forestry trees might not have answered that simple question.

But they have reaffirmed one long-realised fact: timber is an increasingly scarce and valuable commodity worldwide, especially the eco-friendly plantation timbers Mr Reid grows on his farm.

"When people come here, they've never seen a forest like this, because there is a person who has been involved in the management of those trees while they grow," he said.

There are 70 species spaced across the 40-hectare property at Bambra in south-west Victoria.

When Mr Reid arrived in 1987, it was a denuded dairy farm, almost bereft of vegetation.

Now it's a lush world of natives and exotics and a drawcard for tour groups, especially farmers keen to integrate tree growing and timber production into their enterprise....
It's free registration for the ABS iview link to watch the actual Landline episode that the article is based on (link at bottom of the page). ;-)
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Message 2115289 - Posted: 26 Feb 2023, 20:34:19 UTC

Also attached to the above story on Landline is winning the battle of the burp.

How feed additives could cut methane emissions from livestock by 90 per cent.

Scientists appear to have solved one of the biggest environmental challenges facing the global meat industry — how to dramatically reduce methane emissions from cow burps.

Now the race is on as several companies try to commercialise their feed-additive tonics as pills, pellets and powders.

Dutch company Royal DSM has spent the past decade developing a chemically made powder that executive Mark van Nieuwland said reduced methane emissions, when fed to feedlot cattle, by up to 92 per cent.

"It really depends on what's their diet and ration combinations," he said.

"So we've seen anywhere between 50 and 90 per cent [emissions reduction]."

The product, Bovaer, or 3-NOP, is made from nitric acid and bio-based alcohol.

"It's been absolutely safe to feed to animals," Mr van Nieuwland said.

"It has gone through for example the European food safety authorities, which looks at safety for humans, safety for animals, safety for the environment and of course efficacy."....
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Message 2115293 - Posted: 26 Feb 2023, 22:16:28 UTC

The stories are coming in thick and fast this morning.

An Aussie whose ideas caught the eye of the US President and now engineer Saul Griffith is making waves back at home.

Rewiring Australia founder Saul Griffith is a man on a mission to electrify nation, one suburb at a time.

Dr Saul Griffith has found himself in plenty of high-pressure situations over the past two decades. From meetings with White House officials and US politicians, to duelling with the powerful fossil fuel lobby, he's made the case for his solution to the climate crisis in forums where the stakes couldn't be higher.

But it was a Sunday afternoon meeting in a community centre just north of Wollongong that proved "the most intimidating one by far," he said. "You're my neighbours," Saul joked as he stood up to give his presentation. "If we screw up, you literally know where I live."

Originally from the suburbs of Sydney, Saul, 49, lived and worked in the US for over 20 years, where he recently helped politicians write "the largest piece of climate legislation in human history anywhere in the world," he says.

Having returned to live in Australia with his young family, he's now working on another ambitious plan: to see households in his own suburb of Austinmer — and those neighbouring it in the 2515 postcode area — "electrified" and converted to run on renewable energy....
His main aim is to show that our grid can handle going totally green.

I can't wait to see what the price of a battery will be in 4.5yrs time when that solar array of mine is paid off. Anyhow it's time to make use of all those panel and do a bit of welding.

BTW the full link to the full story should be active in 12hrs.
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Message 2115855 - Posted: 9 Mar 2023, 11:43:23 UTC

Are we onto something?

Melbourne scientists find enzyme that can make electricity out of tiny amounts of hydrogen.

Scientists have isolated an enzyme from soil bacteria that can convert air into electricity, which they say could be developed into a renewable power source for small devices.

The Monash University research, published in the peer-reviewed journal Nature, shows that the enzyme called "Huc" can turn tiny amounts of hydrogen present in the air into an electrical current.

An enzyme is a type of protein that can speed up chemical reaction in cells.

Huc is a "natural battery", the scientists said, and while their research is in its very early stages, their discovery has the potential to be a low-cost power source for small objects.

"We've shown that when we isolate [Huc] in the lab we can put that into an electrical circuit and it produces electricity," co-lead researcher Rhys Grinter said.....
It'll be interesting to see how far they can take it.
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Message 2115922 - Posted: 10 Mar 2023, 16:33:17 UTC

Seeing the light of God!


York Minster solar panels plan approved by council
wrote:
Solar panels are to be fitted to the roof of York Minster in a bid to tackle rising energy bills.

Plans to install 199 solar panels on the roof of the South Quire Aisle were approved...

... The panels are expected to generate 75,000 kWh (kilowatt hours) of power a year, to provide energy during the day and for evening services...



We all can do our part far beyond our prayers...

All on our only one planet,
Martin
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Message 2116216 - Posted: 16 Mar 2023, 20:32:38 UTC

What a beautiful move:


Why sleeper trains are being revived across Europe


Next... We just need to slow down the high stressed race of the jet-set day-trippers...

Life is for living!

Enjoy!!
Martin
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Message 2116381 - Posted: 19 Mar 2023, 18:40:27 UTC

Is this letter a workable solution?


The COP28 Agenda is a Recipe for Economic Armageddon: An Open Letter to Sultan Al Jaber, UAE President of COP28
wrote:
In my open letter to the UAE President of COP28, I provide an economic and technological reality-check on how his proposed policies expose us to gigantic financial and ecological risks.

The world has a problem: Big Oil’s hijacking of the climate action narrative. The power of the legacy energy industry means that mountains of flawed and backwards thinking – much of which contributed to the climate crisis – is preventing major institutions from recognising the most transformative pathways forward. It’s also exposing them to gigantic financial risks which are about to unfold in the next few years. I decided to write directly to Sultan Al Jaber, the UAE President of the upcoming United Nations COP28 climate summit, to provide them with an economic and technological reality-check. Here’s my open letter:


That is a BIG letter, with big good points.

What say the politics of changing to something cleaner?


All on our only one planet,
Martin
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Message 2116857 - Posted: 30 Mar 2023, 8:58:37 UTC

Yes we need to put the mangroves back to protect our coasts from erosion and capture carbon.

Scientists use 3D-printed biodegradable structures to halt erosion.

Australian researchers are testing biodegradable, 3D-printed structures to protect budding wetland species while slowing coastal erosion.

Supported by Beach Energy, scientists from Deakin University's Blue Carbon Lab in Victoria are placing mangrove seeds in net-like frames in coastal locations in Port Phillip Bay and Western Port Bay to promote their growth.

The structures slow water flow and encourage soil accumulation, and are particularly beneficial in areas that have experienced erosion or harsh environmental conditions hindering roots from establishing themselves.

The 3D-printed lattice, made of potato starch from industrial waste, biodegrades within two to 10 years.

Over the three-year Regenerating Our Coasts program, researchers will be monitoring the survival and growth of mangroves......
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Message 2116935 - Posted: 31 Mar 2023, 23:08:12 UTC

If they won't do it themselves then new laws will.

EPA approves California rules phasing out diesel trucks.


You could change a lot in that image by just using A and B-doubles which would cut down a lot on the pollution also. ;-)
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Message 2116940 - Posted: 1 Apr 2023, 1:18:39 UTC - in response to Message 2116935.  


You could change a lot in that image by just using A and B-doubles which would cut down a lot on the pollution also. ;-)

Well, the huge amount of pollution to make the roads able to take A and B-doubles would be more. Remember no round-about; it is an intersection so turn radius.
Triples are allowed in some places on some roads but there are total length and weight limits.
Doubles are allowed in more, but there are states that ban them due to their roads, mainly north east states.

Most of the ones in the photo are 40 foot containers on chassis, I do see one 53 foot box though.

I do remember a California highway with a curvy road sign warning "Not recommended more than 24 foot kingpin to rear axle."
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Message 2117012 - Posted: 2 Apr 2023, 23:06:17 UTC

Red seaweed could be the answer to slashing methane emissions from cows, study shows.

Forget fair-trade coffee beans and cows' milk substitutes, low-emission lattes could be the next big thing to land at your local cafe.

A new study has paved the way for the dairy industry to dramatically slash its methane emissions by feeding cattle with an unlikely additive – a native red seaweed called asparagopsis armata.

While the study provides a clear opportunity for dairy farmers to reduce their carbon footprints, it may also kickstart a profitable new "low emissions" marketing avenue for the industry.

Published in the March edition of the international journal Animal Feed Science and Technology, the study found that pouring seaweed-infused canola oil over feedlots slashed their methane emissions without impacting the quality or quantity of milk produced......
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Message 2117171 - Posted: 6 Apr 2023, 3:55:06 UTC

Finally the Aussie Agriculture sector explores ways of putting solar panels in fruit orchards, farm dams

If it wasn't for a stubborn right wight government here we could still be producing solar panels here which would've accelerated this move much earlier. Conservatives are just 1 of the banes to this world getting ahead of itself.
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Message 2117176 - Posted: 6 Apr 2023, 8:20:59 UTC

Due to our last deadbeat government we're a bit behind the times, but approval has been given to build the country's first commercial-scale CSP plant in Port Augusta, South Australia.

Concentrated solar power is an old technology making a comeback. Here's how it works.
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Message 2117320 - Posted: 8 Apr 2023, 23:33:20 UTC

Can we finally have a proper circular PET economy?

Scientists discover plastic-gobbling enzyme that can break down trash in 24 hours: The revolutionary possibilities ‘are endless’.

Researchers at The University of Texas in Austin discovered an enzyme that eats plastic fast, and scientists think it could revolutionize how we deal with waste.

The team used artificial intelligence, chemical engineering, and synthetic biology to turn a natural enzyme called PETase into a plastic-eating machine.

Quick science lesson: PET, which is short for polyethylene terephthalate, the chemical name for polyester, is a clear, strong, and lightweight plastic that’s widely used in food packaging and plastic bottles. PETase got its name from its ability to degrade these PET plastics.

To deconstruct PET plastic even more quickly and at low temperatures, researchers adjusted PETase to create a new enzyme, called FAST-PETase, which gives bacteria the ability to recycle waste plastic efficiently.

Since plastics account for 8% of all solid waste globally and this new enzyme is laser-focused on breaking it down, this is a potentially crucial discovery....
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Message 2117513 - Posted: 12 Apr 2023, 15:43:15 UTC

The tide turns:


Climate change: Fossil fuel emissions from electricity set to fall
wrote:
The world will likely use fewer fossil fuels to produce electricity this year in a "turning point" for planet-friendly energy, a new report says.

It would be the first ever annual drop in the use of coal, oil and gas to generate electricity, outside of a global recession or pandemic.

As a result, fewer warming gases would be released during energy production.

The authors attribute the expected change to a boom in renewable energy led mainly by China...



Soon enough? Quickly enough? Cleanly enough?

All on our only one planet,
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Message 2117673 - Posted: 14 Apr 2023, 22:02:58 UTC

First it was plastic eating bacteria and now fungus can be added to that.

Plastic-eating backyard fungi discovery boosts hopes for a solution to the recycling crisis.
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Message 2117769 - Posted: 16 Apr 2023, 20:27:40 UTC

Way to go?


A Faster Way to Get to a Clean Energy Future | Ramez Naam | TED
wrote:
When it comes to cost, clean energy is bound to beat out fossil fuels..,



... Except...

Can we overcome the 'inertia' soon enough?

For the good of all??

Enough? Soon enough?


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Message 2118002 - Posted: 20 Apr 2023, 20:47:37 UTC

California researchers attempt ocean climate solution
LONG BEACH, Calif. (AP) — Atop a 100-foot barge tied up at the Port of Los Angeles, engineers have built a kind of floating laboratory to answer a simple question: Is there a way to cleanse seawater of carbon dioxide and then return it to the ocean so it can suck more of the greenhouse gas out of the atmosphere to slow global warming?
Called the lungs of the planet, the ocean, whose plants and currents take in carbon dioxide, has already helped the Earth tremendously by absorbing 30 percent of carbon dioxide emissions since the Industrial Revolution and capturing 90 percent of the excess heat from those emissions. Acting as a giant carbon sink, it has been a crucial buffer in protecting people from even worse effects of early climate change.
Seawater can store 150 times more carbon dioxide per unit volume than air, roughly. But absorbing the greenhouse gas has come at a cost, causing oceans to become more acidic, destroying coral reefs and harming marine species, including impeding shellfish from building their skeletons.
The technology, dubbed SeaChange, developed by the University of California Los Angeles engineering faculty, is meant to seize on the ocean’s natural abilities, said Gaurav Sant, director of UCLA’s Institute of Carbon Management.


The article nneds to be read as it also mentions other ways of cleaning the atmosphere.
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Message 2118836 - Posted: 6 May 2023, 0:37:44 UTC

Has our new government slightly missed the mark?

Electrifying commercial delivery vehicles is the fastest way to decarbonise, report finds.

When it comes to decarbonising transport, most of the discussion has been about electrifying light vehicles, such as passenger cars.

But a new report has identified that switching to zero-emission trucks would be the fastest and most efficient way to cut emissions.

The electric vehicle (EV) and trucking industries are calling on the government to urgently introduce a strategy to increase uptake of zero-emission trucks, after medium and heavy vehicles were mostly left out of the national EV strategy released last month.

The report from Adiona Tech, a Sydney-based software startup working in fleet decarbonisation, found that electrifying 10 urban delivery trucks reduces emissions equivalent to that of 56 households purchasing their own EV.

For larger trucks, the figures are even more stark. A single road train produces 50 times more CO2 than a passenger car annually.......
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Message boards : Politics : Climate Change, 'Greenhouse' effects: Solutions #3


 
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