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Message 1775289 - Posted: 31 Mar 2016, 14:10:08 UTC - in response to Message 1775182.  

Nice win, good luck in the final :-)
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Message 1788876 - Posted: 20 May 2016, 0:54:29 UTC

Poor performance, but Hales & Barstow recovered :-)

England v Sri Lanka
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Message 1798935 - Posted: 27 Jun 2016, 2:03:17 UTC

The Aussies have taken out the Tri-Series ODI in the West Indies by beating the W.I. by 58 runs.

Cheers.
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Message 1804501 - Posted: 23 Jul 2016, 16:58:05 UTC

1 - 0 down from the 1st test, so looking good for the 2nd.

Joe Root saves the day
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Message 1805441 - Posted: 28 Jul 2016, 22:26:28 UTC

Re-reading this thread today, and... I'm wondering why it's in "Politics" and not something like the Cafe. Unless there's something that I'm missing.
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Message 1805723 - Posted: 30 Jul 2016, 0:17:41 UTC - in response to Message 1805441.  

It's a follow on from Cricket 1 which I started here as I knew it would turn political (which it did shortly after :-) ), so that confirmed which board.

Aussie's & Pom's love their cricket & it can get a bit heated (good natured at least) & the rest of the threads just "followed on" from there :-)
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Message 1805727 - Posted: 30 Jul 2016, 0:29:55 UTC - in response to Message 1805441.  

Re-reading this thread today, and... I'm wondering why it's in "Politics" and not something like the Cafe. Unless there's something that I'm missing.

Sports are very much political.
Just read about the upcoming Olympic Games in Rio!
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Message 1805846 - Posted: 30 Jul 2016, 13:33:28 UTC

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Message 1807815 - Posted: 7 Aug 2016, 18:07:08 UTC

England take 3rd test

Heading into England's 2nd innings thought it could end up a draw, but after Pakistan's 2nd innings collapse :-)
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Message 1811510 - Posted: 22 Aug 2016, 20:13:32 UTC
Last modified: 22 Aug 2016, 20:41:27 UTC

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Message 1811650 - Posted: 23 Aug 2016, 2:07:28 UTC

That's cool Janne . So it wont be to many years and well see you lot down under playing in the 50 overs world cup then or maybe the T20 world cup
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Message 1811672 - Posted: 23 Aug 2016, 2:46:43 UTC - in response to Message 1811650.  

That's cool Janne . So it wont be to many years and well see you lot down under playing in the 50 overs world cup then or maybe the T20 world cup

Hehe.
Just have to learn about the cricket rules and terminology.
For instance.
Pakistan captain Misbah-ul-Haq has scored centuries all over the globe and can now boast he’s achieved the unusual feat of reaching triple-figures in the Scandinavian nation of Norway.
http://cricketaustralia-a.akamaihd.net/rtmp/807051129001/201608/807051129001_5092729682001_5092718533001.mp4
Score centuries and triple-figures?
Then we have to learn to play upside down:)
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Message 1811675 - Posted: 23 Aug 2016, 2:48:00 UTC - in response to Message 1811672.  

That's cool Janne . So it wont be to many years and well see you lot down under playing in the 50 overs world cup then or maybe the T20 world cup

Hehe.
Just have to learn about the cricket rules and terminology.
For instance.
Pakistan captain Misbah-ul-Haq has scored centuries all over the globe and can now boast he’s achieved the unusual feat of reaching triple-figures in the Scandinavian nation of Norway.
http://cricketaustralia-a.akamaihd.net/rtmp/807051129001/201608/807051129001_5092729682001_5092718533001.mp4
Score centuries and triple-figures?
Then we have to learn to play upside down:)


You have two sides, one out in the field and one in. Each man that's in the side that's in goes out, and when he's out he comes in and the next man goes in until he's out. When they are all out, the side that's out comes in and the side that's been in goes out and tries to get those coming in, out. Sometimes you get men still in and not out.
When a man goes out to go in, the men who are out try to get him out, and when he is out he goes in and the next man in goes out and goes in. There are two men called umpires who stay out all the time and they decide when the men who are in are out. When both sides have been in and all the men have been out, and both sides have been out twice after all the men have been in, including those who are not out, that is the end of the game
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Message 1811691 - Posted: 23 Aug 2016, 3:20:00 UTC - in response to Message 1811672.  


Hehe.
Just have to learn about the cricket rules and terminology.
For instance.
Pakistan captain Misbah-ul-Haq has scored centuries all over the globe and can now boast he’s achieved the unusual feat of reaching triple-figures in the Scandinavian nation of Norway.


yep a century is triple figures and any score 100 or over is called triple figures

1 = units , single figure
10 = tens , double figure
100 = hundreds , a century = exactly 100 and anything over is triple figures
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Message 1811694 - Posted: 23 Aug 2016, 3:23:12 UTC - in response to Message 1811675.  


You have two sides, one out in the field and one in. Each man that's in the side that's in goes out, and when he's out he comes in and the next man goes in until he's out. When they are all out, the side that's out comes in and the side that's been in goes out and tries to get those coming in, out. Sometimes you get men still in and not out.
When a man goes out to go in, the men who are out try to get him out, and when he is out he goes in and the next man in goes out and goes in. There are two men called umpires who stay out all the time and they decide when the men who are in are out. When both sides have been in and all the men have been out, and both sides have been out twice after all the men have been in, including those who are not out, that is the end of the game



Holy crap now I'm confused after that hahahahahahahahahahahahahaha

Got one for how to explain the positions like silly point , mid off , mid on and so on
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Message 1811701 - Posted: 23 Aug 2016, 3:34:05 UTC - in response to Message 1811675.  

You have two sides, one out in the field and one in. Each man that's in the side that's in goes out, and when he's out he comes in and the next man goes in until he's out. When they are all out, the side that's out comes in and the side that's been in goes out and tries to get those coming in, out. Sometimes you get men still in and not out.
When a man goes out to go in, the men who are out try to get him out, and when he is out he goes in and the next man in goes out and goes in. There are two men called umpires who stay out all the time and they decide when the men who are in are out. When both sides have been in and all the men have been out, and both sides have been out twice after all the men have been in, including those who are not out, that is the end of the game

Oh, I never would have guessed.
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Message 1811718 - Posted: 23 Aug 2016, 5:07:50 UTC
Last modified: 23 Aug 2016, 5:18:10 UTC

DUCK A score of zero, named thus because a zero is shaped like a duck’s egg. A duck on the first ball is a golden duck. Two ducks in the same game by the same batter are a pair. Two golden ducks are a king pair.
GOOGLY O.K., pay attention. If a bowler who would ordinarily spin the ball away from a right-handed batsman instead spins it toward him (and vice versa for a left-handed batsman), that’s a googly. If a bowler who would normally spin the ball toward a right-handed batsman spins it away from him, that’s a doosra.

Indeed, cricket’s field placings are so esoteric, one might be forgiven for thinking English gentlemen invented them for the same reason they mispronounce the River Thames and Cambridge’s Magdalene College: just one more trick to separate the upper crust from the rest of the loaf.

For those of us who never went to Eton then (but more out of affectionate humour than egalitarianism), here is an explanation of cricket’s basic field positions. Let us begin with an easy one, so we don’t give ourselves brain damage, as we surely would, if we plunged head first into a deep gully.


Wicket-keeper

The simplest position in all of cricket, including those on the batting team, which includes the pair of openers, the strike and non-strike batsman, the tail-enders and even a possible runner for an injured batsman. Batsmen nowadays are also called batters. The wicket-keeper is only ever the wicket-keeper, or, to his close friends and colleagues in the slips, the keeper.
Slips

The position that sounds next most like what it is, except it is not the fielder who slips, but the batter, whose technique may let him down (though it may be to a very good ball) and cause him to edge a catch. There may be any number of slips, so much so that there is no singular of the position. If there is only one slip fielder, the position is still called “the slips”. If there are more than one, they are called “first slip”, “second slip”, “third slip” and so on. The greater number of close fielders, the more attacking the field is considered. With the current West Indies batting side, it is not inconceivable that the other team’s bowling field might consist of a bowler, a wicket-keeper and first to ninth slips.
Gully

Theoretically, when the slip fielders are too numerous, even for Australia bowling to the Zimbabwe number ten and 11, the number six slip (or so) will himself slip off the edge of slips and tumble into the gully. Sounds as reasonable as anything you might read in Wisden.
Point

Now this could be easily explained, but what would be the point? This position came into existence because it was the one right next to gully, close enough for the captain setting his field to say, “No, not there! There! There! There!” And then he would — wait for it — point.
Backward point

This would be a fielder who is not very clever generally and out-and-out bad in the point position, but who has to be picked because it’s his gear and he brings the beer for after the game. No, seriously — or as serious as this guide will get, anyway — the position of backward point evolved because some BBC commentator once, live on-air, forgot the name for square leg and had to think fast.
Silly point

All the positions prefixed with “silly”, such as silly point, are the most accurately named in cricket, not because it is silly strategically to place someone there, like punting on first down or playing defensively when the other team is three goals up, but because you would have to be silly in the head to stand there for a moment, far less bend over facing the end of the bat with your hands anywhere other than wrapped protectively around your head.
Cover point

This position, a little farther away from the batting crease, was the closest the first insurance salesmen would come to sell funeral coverage policies to a man fielding at silly point.
Cover

This was where the insurance policies would be signed, between overs.
Extra-cover

This position, as the name implies, was where insurance salesmen would explain additional insurance benefits, such as full permanent disability, to fielders. It developed in the 1980s when Clive Lloyd’s West Indian team with its fearsome four-pronged pace attack dominated the cricket world.
Mid-on

Actually, this is a fairly straightforward one, by cricket’s very confusing standards. The leg side is called the on-side, apparently because you always get on a horse from its own left side and the nobility, who first played cricket, because they had the time, because they didn’t have to dig their children out of collapsed mine shafts, looked at the wicket the way they looked at a horse. Or something. Anyway, mid-on is not in the middle of the on-side between wicket and wicket, as you might think. It’s not in the middle of the field, either. It’s just in the mid.
Silly mid-on

See silly point.
Mid-off

The off-side, of course, is the side that is not the on-side. It’s actually not as straightforward as it seemed a mere two paragraphs ago, though, because horses don’t bat or write letters or sign autographs or do anything with their hands. A horse’s on-side is therefore always its left side. A right-handed batsman will have his on- or leg-side on his left side; a left-handed batsman, however, batting the other way, will have his on-side on his right side. And if you have a right-handed batter and a left-handed one batting together (which is to say, at opposite ends of the wicket), the on- and off- sides are reversed every time they score a single, causing the field to be laterally inverted for potentially every other ball. This is the only time fielding at silly point becomes an advantage: it is a shorter walk. Pity the guy at deep mid-wicket; he is better off letting the ball run for four.
Silly mid-off

A marginally safer fielding position than silly mid-on in the Caribbean, if only because it is a natural West Indian tendency to play across the line — we used to do it well once, though our current struggles to play the line itself belies that — and a feisty Jamaican crossbat would open the skull of silly mid-on faster than a hatchet-wielding orc in Lord of the Rings.
Mid-wicket

Perhaps the only sensibly named position after wicket-keeper. This fielder stands roughly in the middle of the wicket, on the on- or leg-side.
Short leg

Cricket, though considered elitist, has always made space for the handicapable.
Forward short leg

Even the impolite ones.
Backward short leg

The more handicapped you are, the greater your options, like in the good old days of socialist governments.
Square leg

Again, this position was once literally and accurately called “peg leg”, but an early politically correct movement softened offence by sharpening the corners. Okay, okay, this position is at right angles, or square, to the batsman’s legs. It is usually occupied by the second umpire who is called the square leg umpire, except in Australia, where what he is called after giving an Aussie batter out cannot be printed in a family journal.
Leg slip, leg gully

These are mirror reflections of their off-side originals; they might just as easily have been called on slip and on gully; but they weren’t.
Fine leg

That a fielding position in an all-male game could end up with a name like this, proves cricket evolved in English boarding schools. No, all right, the “fine” here does not reflect an appreciation of a player’s well-built thigh. “Fine” refers to the delicacy of the glance the batsman would have to make for the ball to run to the boundary at such an acute angle to the wicket.
Long leg

This is called long leg because it is a long way from the wicket and the player fielding here needs long arms to throw it back, but even Victorian cricketers accepted that they couldn’t make the field even more confusing by bringing in a long arm, which would have led naturally to a short arm, forward short arm and deep backward square cover arm. No, okay, it’s a boundary or long position on the leg side.
Deep square leg

It’s nice to think there is something philosophical going on here, but there isn’t. The only thing deep about deep square leg is the daydream the fielder can fall into, so far away from the rest of the game. Yes, it is another boundary position, the farthest the captain can send a useless fielder square of the batting crease.
Deep mid-on

Same as deep square leg, except the fielder doesn’t quite get to the boundary. This is to ensure he can run backwards with his eye on a lofted ball, for a distance long enough for him to fall over and give the crowd a bit of a laugh.
Long-on

Even by cricket’s non-existing standards, mid-on and long-on were misnamed. Everything else on the leg side is named by reference to the leg, not the on-side. Strictly speaking, long-on should have been long leg, but that was already taken by long arm, so they decided to do something that would appear simple if you didn’t think about it too long, and just have long-on next door to long-off, its mirror reflection.
Deep extra cover, deep backward point, deep gully

Just like extra cover, backward point and gully, except not as dangerous and, therefore the players who field there are, relatively speaking, less shallow.
Long-off

Following the example of cover, extra cover and deep extra cover, and point, backward point and deep backward point, this position really ought to have been called deep extra bowler.
Third man

Another position that evolved because the captain kept shouting at the fine leg and deep backward point, the two guys covering nine o’clock to midnight on the clock face of the cricket ground, “No, no, not there! There! There! There!” And then he would get fed-up and send out — wait for it — a third man to show them where to stand.

So there you have it: most of what you need to know to find your way around a cricket pitch. Small wonder the batting side is restricted to two openers and batsmen number three through 11.
In any case, experienced weekend players will tell you the best position to occupy for all five days of a Test Match is first served, the first stool at the pavilion bar.
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Message 1811734 - Posted: 23 Aug 2016, 5:56:05 UTC - in response to Message 1811718.  

I knew it.
It's more then being in or out!
I think I will practice this together with our dog Tosca.
Me as a batter and her as an out player:)
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Message 1811748 - Posted: 23 Aug 2016, 6:25:07 UTC - in response to Message 1811718.  
Last modified: 23 Aug 2016, 6:49:47 UTC

My God, no wonder you people lost the Empire.




edit:
I can feel an attack of the vapors coming on....
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Message 1811757 - Posted: 23 Aug 2016, 6:45:00 UTC - in response to Message 1811748.  

Cricket will be included in the 2024 Olympics if Rome wins its bid to host the games, the president of the Italian board has said.
Last time was in the 1900 Summer Olympics in France.
Now IOC only have to understand the Cricket rules.
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