Interesting Physics

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Profile janneseti
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Message 1721808 - Posted: 3 Sep 2015, 20:18:52 UTC - in response to Message 1721676.  

"Whatever happens, will happen. But if u don't have choices & free will, like electrons don't, then u'll change also!"
;)

The Many-Worlds Interpretation says that if something happens all other choices happens as well.
Multiple universes have been hypothesized in cosmology, physics, astronomy, religion, philosophy, transpersonal psychology, and fiction, particularly in science fiction and fantasy. In these contexts, parallel universes are also called "alternate universes", "quantum universes", "interpenetrating dimensions", "parallel dimensions", "parallel worlds", "alternate realities", "alternate timelines", and "dimensional planes", among other names.
Cosmologist Max Tegmark professor at MIT are studying this.
http://space.mit.edu/home/tegmark/crazy.html
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Message 1721977 - Posted: 4 Sep 2015, 6:35:49 UTC

"Nature" magazine calls the result of the Hanson experiment "Entanglement swapping". My interpretation was correct, the two photons becoming entangled at C propel back the entanglement to the electrons in A and B.
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Message 1723542 - Posted: 8 Sep 2015, 13:26:37 UTC

"Nature" also signals the proof of the existence of Weyl fermions, named after Hermann Weyl. So we have three fermion classes, the Dirac fermions, the Weyl fermions which have no mass and are excitations in crystals, and the Majorana fermions that are their own antiparticles. Only these last are yet to be detected in experiments.
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Message 1725036 - Posted: 12 Sep 2015, 13:36:37 UTC - in response to Message 1723542.  
Last modified: 12 Sep 2015, 14:18:05 UTC

Anyway, tullio.

Please see here.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wormhole

You may be able to see that science has yet to prove the existence of wormholes, but according to the theory of general relativity, there should be reason to belive that such objects do exist in space.

Therefore nature is supposed to be the building master of everything. The Big Bang initially created the universe from supposedly nothing and also created the laws in which it is supposed to be working.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cygnus_X-1

Again, such a creation should be regarded as being a masterpiece of skills and has nothing to do with either a painting, or even a simple equation.

We are supposed to either believe in such a creation because we happen to be a part of it. Are we supposed to believe in a God because there could be certain things which might not be explained?

Or is should a possible notion about the presence of God only because we find religion and preaching being an important fact of our life, at least when it comes to some of us.

Perhaps finish right here, because I wanted to ask about whether possible wormholes could exist in space based on our knowledge about elementary particles. There should be no reason to assume the existence of any God, regardless of whether or not wormholes do exist.

Rather, if you are able to assume or conclude that neutron stars and Black Holes do exist, you should be doing the same when it comes to the existence of possible wormholes.
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Message 1725063 - Posted: 12 Sep 2015, 14:53:17 UTC - in response to Message 1725036.  

A wormhole --if it is actually possible will ostensibly require almost infinite energy to keep it open--or so they say.
My idea to think about this is to think of a two dimensional Mobius strip which has only one surface. If you are on the top side of this strip you could punch a hole through to the other side and save a lot of time in travelling to that point by not having to go all the way round the strip.

So we may need another dimension to travel in to get a worm hole to work. It also seems that we could not go where we wanted but only to that location in the universe that was on the other side of that dimension.
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Message 1725065 - Posted: 12 Sep 2015, 14:59:28 UTC - in response to Message 1725063.  

A wormhole --if it is actually possible will ostensibly require almost infinite energy to keep it open--or so they say.
My idea to think about this is to think of a two dimensional Mobius strip which has only one surface. If you are on the top side of this strip you could punch a hole through to the other side and save a lot of time in travelling to that point by not having to go all the way round the strip.

So we may need another dimension to travel in to get a worm hole to work. It also seems that we could not go where we wanted but only to that location in the universe that was on the other side of that dimension.

Möbius:)
Here is a party trick.
One can make its own Möbius strip by taking a rectangular strip of paper, twist one end by a half turn and pasting the ends together.
Now use a scissor to cut the strip in half.
Surprise:)
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Message 1725076 - Posted: 12 Sep 2015, 15:15:07 UTC
Last modified: 12 Sep 2015, 15:23:34 UTC

I have nothing against wormholes but I still think that Wikipedia is not the most reliable of sources. I've read that they are asking scientists to support them with sounder informations (there is a Wikipedia Science Conference in London where scientists and Wikipedians meet). As for Cyg-X1 it was discovered by the Uhuru astronomical satellite launched by a Scout rocket from the San Marco Italian base in Kenya and was the work of Riccardo Giacconi, who later was honored with a Nobel prize. Uhuru means Freedom in Swahili.
Tullio
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Message 1725116 - Posted: 12 Sep 2015, 16:52:09 UTC
Last modified: 12 Sep 2015, 16:58:55 UTC

You did not really give an answer to my question here, tullio.

As I said, there is no proof that wormholes really do exist.

But from a point of science, such objects are more likely to exist than not.

At least that is my opinion.

What is the alternative reference when it comes to such things?

The Wikipedia is supposed to be the Free Encyclopedia, meaning that its contents could be anything. What you may be able to read there is supposed to be the result of individual contributions when it comes to opinion or view.

But read between the lines and you will find out that this is not the case anymore.

Rather such a question should be about a current limit when it comes to our or about our current knowledge.

Are we again back to the drawing board once again where we "think" that something might be true and existing and next we are able to "prove" that such a thing is in fact true?

Or is it a possibility that in fact even scientists could get it wrong at times?

Again, notice that a possible existence of such a wormhole could be explained by Einstein's General Law of Theory.

A wormhole, if it does exist should be something different than a Black Hole, of course. The latter is the result of a star which explodes in a supernova, the remnant collapses inward on itself, creating either a neutron star or such a Black Hole.

Both these types of objects are enigmatic and elusive ones and likely to be existing in space and they also should be telling us where the universe could supposedly end.

I will have a little more to say about this later on in my own thread.
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Message 1725123 - Posted: 12 Sep 2015, 17:11:16 UTC

Hypotheses non fingo, said Isaac Newton. I stay with him.
Tullio
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Message 1725370 - Posted: 13 Sep 2015, 13:35:02 UTC
Last modified: 13 Sep 2015, 13:36:30 UTC

- Fire has been our most important tool and our constant companion, said Stephen Pyne, a professor of history at the University of Arizona in the United States, who has written several books on the fire's history.

Right up to the 1700s was the fire is always present, both in nature and in all human activities. Humans used fire to cook, heat their homes, for entertainment, in agriculture and in workshops and factories. Even ritual fire was central.

- The fire was important in religious rituals and ceremonies. All our years of festivals is fire ceremonies, from Christmas bonfire to Midsummer fire, from Halloween to May Day celebrations, said Stephen Pyne.

On Monday, he lectures about our relationship to fire, and how it changed with the Enlightenment Age and industrialization, when the Royal Society in London organizes a meeting of the interaction between fire and humanity.
https://royalsociety.org/events/2015/09/fire-and-mankind/

People have had fireplaces in 400 000 years, and there is quite good evidence that our ancestors had learned to light fires for at least a million years ago.
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Message 1725613 - Posted: 14 Sep 2015, 8:58:08 UTC - in response to Message 1725370.  

- Fire has been our most important tool and our constant companion, said Stephen Pyne, a professor of history at the University of Arizona in the United States, who has written several books on the fire's history.

Right up to the 1700s was the fire is always present, both in nature and in all human activities. Humans used fire to cook, heat their homes, for entertainment, in agriculture and in workshops and factories. Even ritual fire was central.

- The fire was important in religious rituals and ceremonies. All our years of festivals is fire ceremonies, from Christmas bonfire to Midsummer fire, from Halloween to May Day celebrations, said Stephen Pyne.

On Monday, he lectures about our relationship to fire, and how it changed with the Enlightenment Age and industrialization, when the Royal Society in London organizes a meeting of the interaction between fire and humanity.
https://royalsociety.org/events/2015/09/fire-and-mankind/

People have had fireplaces in 400 000 years, and there is quite good evidence that our ancestors had learned to light fires for at least a million years ago.

I just wander who threw a match for that fireball we call Sun? must be some of a great Fire-starter!
:D

No wonder people in past were worshiping Sun-god (Egypt, Aztecs, etc.)

non-profit org. Play4Life in Zagreb, Croatia, EU
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Message 1725620 - Posted: 14 Sep 2015, 10:33:26 UTC - in response to Message 1725613.  
Last modified: 14 Sep 2015, 10:39:02 UTC

- Fire has been our most important tool and our constant companion, said Stephen Pyne, a professor of history at the University of Arizona in the United States, who has written several books on the fire's history.

Right up to the 1700s was the fire is always present, both in nature and in all human activities. Humans used fire to cook, heat their homes, for entertainment, in agriculture and in workshops and factories. Even ritual fire was central.

- The fire was important in religious rituals and ceremonies. All our years of festivals is fire ceremonies, from Christmas bonfire to Midsummer fire, from Halloween to May Day celebrations, said Stephen Pyne.

On Monday, he lectures about our relationship to fire, and how it changed with the Enlightenment Age and industrialization, when the Royal Society in London organizes a meeting of the interaction between fire and humanity.
https://royalsociety.org/events/2015/09/fire-and-mankind/

People have had fireplaces in 400 000 years, and there is quite good evidence that our ancestors had learned to light fires for at least a million years ago.

I just wander who threw a match for that fireball we call Sun? must be some of a great Fire-starter!
:D

No wonder people in past were worshiping Sun-god (Egypt, Aztecs, etc.)

In the past? We Swedes are still worshiping the Sun:)

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Message 1725629 - Posted: 14 Sep 2015, 10:56:45 UTC
Last modified: 14 Sep 2015, 11:18:44 UTC

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Message 1725776 - Posted: 14 Sep 2015, 19:56:32 UTC - in response to Message 1719616.  

I found another interesting article on my smart phone that I thought was worth sharing. This new phone has been the source of a remarkable amount of information. This thread can be for anything interesting in physics that may not warrant a separate thread.

http://www.nature.com/news/quantum-spookiness-passes-toughest-test-yet-1.18255

Steve

Interesting article, but... I'm the one guy in the crowd looking around instead of at my hands because I don't and won't own a smart phone. The idea of carrying something around that would be as distracting as the machine that eats up my time at home just sounds insane to me.
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Message 1725826 - Posted: 14 Sep 2015, 23:23:22 UTC - in response to Message 1721233.  

The only new thing I learned is that a DNA mutation can derive from a quantum tunneling effect in a Hydrogen bond.Tullio

Quantum tunneling effect is very interesting.
It means that particles can transition from a energy state higher to a lower state without requiring energy.
But this happens all the time.
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Message 1725915 - Posted: 15 Sep 2015, 8:04:30 UTC

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Message 1725919 - Posted: 15 Sep 2015, 8:58:46 UTC - in response to Message 1725915.  

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Message 1725943 - Posted: 15 Sep 2015, 12:25:51 UTC - in response to Message 1725919.  

From what I read, scientists are warning against the danger of drilling for oil or other minerals and bringing to the surface the virus particles.
Tullio
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Message 1725944 - Posted: 15 Sep 2015, 12:31:37 UTC
Last modified: 15 Sep 2015, 12:32:22 UTC

What I wonder is how a virus can survive that long underground?
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Message 1725948 - Posted: 15 Sep 2015, 13:04:07 UTC - in response to Message 1725944.  

Virus can survive low temperatures and also space environment. Once people thought that comets would bring plagues and maybe they were right.
Tullio
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