Big bang - not so much a "bang"??


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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Big bang - not so much a "bang"??

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Message 1308930 - Posted: 22 Nov 2012, 19:43:00 UTC - in response to Message 1308545.
Last modified: 22 Nov 2012, 19:44:53 UTC

Now for a really good mind bender for the thread:


Is our Universe "rotating"?

And so can we detect/observe some form of Coriolis effect?...


Keep searchin',
Martin


I don't think so. In order for something to be rotating, there has to be some outside reference for it to be rotating in. Since the universe is everything, there is nothing outside for it to be rotating in.

KenzieB, I'm not too sure about your answer here for various physicist's, Prof
Lisa Randall for one, fully suspect that there are many universes around and
about us. To this end there must be a void outside our universe that creates a
gap between us and those other universes about. As regards the universe rotating
my answer will be 'no', else we would see different parts of the universe
expanding as different rates....would we not?
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Message 1309410 - Posted: 23 Nov 2012, 19:36:21 UTC - in response to Message 1308930.
Last modified: 23 Nov 2012, 19:37:10 UTC

Now for a really good mind bender for the thread:


Is our Universe "rotating"?

And so can we detect/observe some form of Coriolis effect?...


Keep searchin',
Martin


I don't think so. In order for something to be rotating, there has to be some outside reference for it to be rotating in. Since the universe is everything, there is nothing outside for it to be rotating in.

KenzieB, I'm not too sure about your answer here for various physicist's, Prof
Lisa Randall for one, fully suspect that there are many universes around and
about us. To this end there must be a void outside our universe that creates a
gap between us and those other universes about. As regards the universe rotating
my answer will be 'no', else we would see different parts of the universe
expanding as different rates....would we not?

I think we have differing definitions of what the universe is. When I say universe, I mean everything. If there are other, smaller universes out there beyond ours then they, too, are a part of the universe as a whole.
In that case, our little 'universe' probably does rotate. But the bigger universe (that contains all those smaller universes) doesn't rotate.
All depends on your definition of that word: universe. :)
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Message 1309739 - Posted: 24 Nov 2012, 12:06:12 UTC

Kenzies answer ties in very nicely with my own theory of our "local" big bang, in a large single universe, with probably other big bangs going on elsewhere. What we are observing going on all around us is just what is happening in our little bit of the universe.

Our little bit is not the whole universe, and there are not many other universes, there is just one.



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Message 1311185 - Posted: 28 Nov 2012, 23:16:20 UTC

A recent bang.

Scientists record most powerful quasar blast ever

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Message 1311277 - Posted: 29 Nov 2012, 6:37:08 UTC - in response to Message 1311185.

A recent bang.

Scientists record most powerful quasar blast ever


Huge!!
Scientists have reported the largest blast of energy ever recorded from a far-off quasar, some two trillion times more energetic than the sun.

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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Big bang - not so much a "bang"??

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