Wow Signal Planetary Origin


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Michael Watson
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Message 1051504 - Posted: 27 Nov 2010, 16:22:08 UTC - in response to Message 1051455.

Given the known antenna pattern asymmetry, the correlation with a gaussian distribution was better than .99 . This was also checked against a strong astrophysical radio source, which gave the same distribution to a correlation of greater than .99 . Michael

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Message 1074793 - Posted: 6 Feb 2011, 17:55:30 UTC

The WOW siganl aperently came from the direction of Tau Sagittari, which is a spectral type K1 or K2 giant, 1.5 - 2 Solar masses, with an apparent magnitude of +3.32. It is slightly cooler than sun, of a light orange color,with a temperature of 4440 Kelvin, the star radiates at a rate of 92 times that of Sun. It is between 1.5 to 2.8 billions old, and rotates slowly, it is a stable star. Being cooler than the sun, the habitable zone would be closer to the star, has SETI scanned that region recently.

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Message 1074868 - Posted: 6 Feb 2011, 22:23:46 UTC - in response to Message 1074793.

the distance is too far to get a signal. optimally we are looking for signals from less than 100 light years away
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Message 1079763 - Posted: 20 Feb 2011, 18:31:35 UTC

how was The Big Ear then able to pick a possible non terrastial signal from the direction Tau Saggitari, Saggitarius is close the galactic bulge

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Message 1079791 - Posted: 20 Feb 2011, 19:49:45 UTC - in response to Message 1079763.

how was The Big Ear then able to pick a possible non terrastial signal from the direction Tau Saggitari, Saggitarius is close the galactic bulge

The centre of the Galaxy is in the direction of Sagittarius, but the stars that make up the constellation are all much closer. According to the parallax given by Simbad, Tau Sagittarii is 37±2 parsecs, or about 120 light-years, from here.

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Message 1079853 - Posted: 21 Feb 2011, 0:51:33 UTC

With 20 stars in Sagittarius known to have planets, so it could be a good candidate for future missions looking for rocky planets, it is the constellation with most stars, so Saggitarius could be a more interesting target than Cygnus, Lyra and Draco for Kepler.

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Message 1079861 - Posted: 21 Feb 2011, 1:32:21 UTC

HD 150706 appears to contain a jupiter size planet in the habitable zone, could this be real life Avatar scenario

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Message 1079991 - Posted: 21 Feb 2011, 13:16:16 UTC - in response to Message 1079861.

how so. more like a moon of endor.
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Message 1080085 - Posted: 21 Feb 2011, 18:02:54 UTC

Parent Star: HD 150706 (GO V) in the constellation of Ursa Minor is located at a distance of 88.71 Light Years from our Solar system. Co-ordinates of Right Ascension: 16 31 17.5856 & Declination: 79 47 23.189. The apparent Magnitude of the star is 7.029

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Message 1080088 - Posted: 21 Feb 2011, 18:08:10 UTC - in response to Message 1080085.

So this gas giant is habitable? to you?
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Message 1080095 - Posted: 21 Feb 2011, 18:15:49 UTC - in response to Message 1080088.

Referring to a Titan size moon that might orbit the planet, that moon could be abitable, not the planet itself. Jovian planets are not abitable,they are gaseous planets with no rocky interiors.

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Message 1080383 - Posted: 22 Feb 2011, 16:22:55 UTC - in response to Message 1080095.

well I was beginning to wonder if you were going to say what you meant. Then you'd have to worry about the constant night sky from the moon. Since you'd be whirled around the gas giant and your moons rotation would be determinant to the planet you may have a very cold side to the planet. making habitation difficult.
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Message 1080635 - Posted: 23 Feb 2011, 14:46:39 UTC

I don't see any problem about sunlight reaching any part of the surface of a tidally locked moon of a Jovian planet. The orbital period would presumably be comparable to the major moons of Jupiter, on the order of several days. The moon would present all sides to the Sun, in the course of its orbit. The climate pattern would be interesting, though. The side facing away from Jupiter would experience the widest swings of temperature, while the other side would receive less heat, due to the lower Sun angle, but less variation of temperature. Also, the diurnal cycle of the latter side would apparently be half that of the former, with night occurring when it was between the Sun and the planet, and again during long eclipses of the Sun by the planet, on the other side of its orbit. Michael

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Message 1081672 - Posted: 26 Feb 2011, 17:00:11 UTC

If that hypothetical titan size moon orbits HD 150706 (GO V) and is permanently locked with its jovian planet, then it might be harsh for life to survive in such a moon due to great diferention in temperatures between the nigh side and day side. However, if such a moon has Venusian type dense atmosphere , heat could be distributed throughout all the moon making temperatures friendly for life on the night side. However, can such a moon not be permanently locked to its jovian planet, meaning, can that moon be distant enough where it has self rotation, thus allowing for a more earthly envioroment.

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Message 1081801 - Posted: 26 Feb 2011, 22:53:36 UTC
Last modified: 26 Feb 2011, 22:57:05 UTC

If you draw a circle to represent a Jovian planet, and a a larger circle around it to represent the orbit of a large moon, you can see that a moon with one side always facing the planet does *Not* have one side always facing the star ( a day side) and one side always facing away from the star (a night side). Make eight small circles on the moon's orbit, equally spaced. Shade in the half of the moon always facing toward the planet. These represent various positions of the moon as it orbits the planet. Make another circle some distance away from the moon and planet to represent the star. It should be clear that the star will shine on every part of the moon, in the course of its orbit, just as is the case with Earth's (tidally locked) Moon, which has no fixed dark and light sides. It merely has a half that can be seen from Earth and one that can not. Both sides receive sunlight in the course of the month it takes to move completely around the Earth. Michael

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Message 1082357 - Posted: 28 Feb 2011, 13:34:56 UTC - in response to Message 1081801.

that is correct. though parts of the moon would at best would see dawn or dusk and nothing else.

Lets also not forget that our Gas Giant is also an asteroid/comet magnet. Astronomers have witnessed at least 3 hits on Jupiter in the last couple of decades. Now lets extrapolate out how often that actually happens every millenia. Then, how often a moon gets struck by asteroid/comet debris. I'd say any moon around a gas giant is a bad place to be for a long period of time.
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Message 1082410 - Posted: 28 Feb 2011, 18:27:05 UTC - in response to Message 1082357.

Regarding the impact histories of gas giant planets and their moons, we have to work from what we know of our own system. Given the relative sizes of Jupiter and its moons, and the relative strengths of their gravity fields, it appears that the vast majority of asteroid and comet impacts are absorbed by the planet, rather than its moons. This is apparently why both Ganymede and Europa retain large areas of ancient cratered terrain, on the order of 4.5 billion years old, that have not been reworked by more recent impacts. It is surmised that impacts were far more common in the early history of the solar system than they area now. The Earth and Moon experienced this too, the latter retaining its craters. In the case of the Earth, geological processes have erased or obscured most of these. Michael

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Message 1082564 - Posted: 1 Mar 2011, 3:41:54 UTC - in response to Message 1082410.

If a jovian planets, such as Jupiter,Saturn, are placed on the goldy locks orbit, will gas those planete clapse onto itself to the its rocky core. In other words, would a jovian planet become an ocean planet because of water becomeing liquid with temperate temperatures. Could in theory a Jovian planet become indeed a rocky planet in the habitable zone, how would Jupiter behave and look like if it was placed on Earth's orbit, would it be a place hospitable to life?

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Message 1082579 - Posted: 1 Mar 2011, 4:55:08 UTC - in response to Message 1082564.

Jovian planets are also called “gas giants” because they’re, well, gaseous. They don’t apparently have rocky cores; Jupiter’s, for example, is thought to be made of metallic hydrogen.

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Message 1082718 - Posted: 1 Mar 2011, 15:39:57 UTC
Last modified: 1 Mar 2011, 15:41:52 UTC

There's speculation that Jupiter might have a rocky core. We don't really know. It's not unreasonable that primordial gasses would have condensed around a rocky planetesimal, early in the formation of the solar system. It does not appear that a gas giant planet would be greatly altered it it were moved nearer its sun. Its immense gravity and pressure would probably still dominate the picture, maintaining the status quo. Michael

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