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Profile littlegreenmanfrommars
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Message 464760 - Posted: 24 Nov 2006, 7:56:12 UTC - in response to Message 464478.

Gordon Bennett. (<-- who the hell was he anyway?)


Try this



Very interesting... I always wondered about that one ;)
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Message 464761 - Posted: 24 Nov 2006, 7:59:12 UTC - in response to Message 464543.

There is another term I remember being used in the film 'Mutiny on the Bounty,' when Captain Bligh announced to one of the crew that he would 'kiss the gunner's daughter.' I don't know why they referred to it in that way, but the unfortunate felon was tied over a cannon and flogged. I don't think they made that up for the film but it might be an old naval expression. However, unlike some, it seems that it has not passed into the English language.


A bit off topic Susan, but did you know Captain Bligh was later made Governor of New South Wales? Under his "rule" there was a mutiny, making him the only British officer ever to have been involved in two mutinies.
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Message 464795 - Posted: 24 Nov 2006, 11:51:19 UTC
Last modified: 24 Nov 2006, 11:52:03 UTC

Then there's another British expression: "By Jove!"

"By Jove!" was a mild oath, an exclamation that indicated surprise or gave emphasis to some comment. The Jove referred to was Jovius, the Roman name for Jupiter, the CEO at the head of the table of the Greek Gods.

I've heard a couple of Brits (and one Canadian) utter it, but never an American.
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Message 464818 - Posted: 24 Nov 2006, 12:38:04 UTC - in response to Message 464795.
Last modified: 24 Nov 2006, 12:38:53 UTC

Then there's another British expression: "By Jove!"

"By Jove!" was a mild oath, an exclamation that indicated surprise or gave emphasis to some comment. The Jove referred to was Jovius, the Roman name for Jupiter, the CEO at the head of the table of the Greek Gods.

I've heard a couple of Brits (and one Canadian) utter it, but never an American.


Pretty old-fashioned, Beets, and usually uttered by the upper classes, I think. I only ever heard that phrase on TV or in "period piece" movies. I believe we derive the word "Jovial" meaning jolly and friendly. Not sure how that connection was made. If I remember my ancient mythology, Jove (Greek: Zeus) was a bit of a bloody-minded sort.
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Message 464859 - Posted: 24 Nov 2006, 13:56:09 UTC - in response to Message 464818.

Then there's another British expression: "By Jove!"

"By Jove!" was a mild oath, an exclamation that indicated surprise or gave emphasis to some comment. The Jove referred to was Jovius, the Roman name for Jupiter, the CEO at the head of the table of the Greek Gods.

I've heard a couple of Brits (and one Canadian) utter it, but never an American.


Pretty old-fashioned, Beets, and usually uttered by the upper classes, I think. I only ever heard that phrase on TV or in "period piece" movies. I believe we derive the word "Jovial" meaning jolly and friendly. Not sure how that connection was made. If I remember my ancient mythology, Jove (Greek: Zeus) was a bit of a bloody-minded sort.

By Jove! I do believe you're right!

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Message 464901 - Posted: 24 Nov 2006, 16:17:00 UTC

hoist by your own retardthis definition has naughty words in it I would other wise cut and paste but the "mods" might not like it.lol
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Message 465090 - Posted: 24 Nov 2006, 21:04:33 UTC - in response to Message 464537.

Hornblower was a series of novels. Hornblower kept increasing in rank throughout the series. I do not remember the name of the author.

C.S. Forester

MJ

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Message 465161 - Posted: 24 Nov 2006, 23:21:50 UTC - in response to Message 464901.

hoist by your own retardthis definition has naughty words in it I would other wise cut and paste but the "mods" might not like it.lol


Just edit the naughty words before you hit submit.

I have suggested that to another person in another thread, and it seems to work. It also keeps the post from being modded...lol

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Message 465176 - Posted: 25 Nov 2006, 0:11:50 UTC

'Bob's yer uncle' - that's an old cockney expression and I think it means the same as 'told yer so' or 'what did I tell yer?'
Actually I don't know who 'Bob' refers to or why he's yer uncle if something crops up unexpectedly.
'Bob's yer uncle,' - I've just been modded.
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Message 465200 - Posted: 25 Nov 2006, 0:37:21 UTC - in response to Message 465176.

'Bob's yer uncle' - that's an old cockney expression and I think it means the same as 'told yer so' or 'what did I tell yer?'
Actually I don't know who 'Bob' refers to or why he's yer uncle if something crops up unexpectedly.
'Bob's yer uncle,' - I've just been modded.

There you have it!
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Message 465360 - Posted: 25 Nov 2006, 4:31:03 UTC - in response to Message 465176.

'Bob's yer uncle' - that's an old cockney expression and I think it means the same as 'told yer so' or 'what did I tell yer?'
Actually I don't know who 'Bob' refers to or why he's yer uncle if something crops up unexpectedly.
'Bob's yer uncle,' - I've just been modded.


You got modded???

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Message 465388 - Posted: 25 Nov 2006, 5:44:04 UTC - in response to Message 465176.

'Bob's yer uncle' - that's an old cockney expression and I think it means the same as 'told yer so' or 'what did I tell yer?'
Actually I don't know who 'Bob' refers to or why he's yer uncle if something crops up unexpectedly.
'Bob's yer uncle,' - I've just been modded.


I always used this one in the same way one would say: "Voila" Sort of "the job's done, or "there you go", that sort of thing.

As for modded... I was modded a while back, but it was just for suggesting a thread be stickied. Who could you possibly have upset, Sue?
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Message 465389 - Posted: 25 Nov 2006, 5:45:46 UTC - in response to Message 464859.

By Jove! I do believe you're right!


Awfully nice of you to say so, old fellow! :)
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Message 465458 - Posted: 25 Nov 2006, 10:24:39 UTC - in response to Message 465389.
Last modified: 25 Nov 2006, 10:45:22 UTC

By Jove! I do believe you're right!


Awfully nice of you to say so, old fellow! :)

Dear Chap, too kind of you, you fully deserved it. :)


In appreciation, here are four more I'm sure you're familiar with:

"Poacher relish", "cosh pocket", "Cornish pasties" and "nonce". ;)

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Message 465556 - Posted: 25 Nov 2006, 13:58:32 UTC - in response to Message 465458.

By Jove! I do believe you're right!


Awfully nice of you to say so, old fellow! :)

Dear Chap, too kind of you, you fully deserved it. :)


In appreciation, here are four more I'm sure you're familiar with:

"Poacher relish", "cosh pocket", "Cornish pasties" and "nonce". ;)


The second one I can take a wild guess at Beets, the last two should be well known, but Beets has me beat on the first one!
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Message 465593 - Posted: 25 Nov 2006, 15:53:24 UTC - in response to Message 465556.

By Jove! I do believe you're right!


Awfully nice of you to say so, old fellow! :)

Dear Chap, too kind of you, you fully deserved it. :)


In appreciation, here are four more I'm sure you're familiar with:

"Poacher relish", "cosh pocket", "Cornish pasties" and "nonce". ;)


The second one I can take a wild guess at Beets, the last two should be well known, but Beets has me beat on the first one!

everyone on face value has a meaning that is kid friendly
but according to "The Urban dictionary" the alternative meanings
are disgusting....
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Message 465602 - Posted: 25 Nov 2006, 16:05:27 UTC - in response to Message 465556.
Last modified: 25 Nov 2006, 16:09:07 UTC

By Jove! I do believe you're right!


Awfully nice of you to say so, old fellow! :)

Dear Chap, too kind of you, you fully deserved it. :)


In appreciation, here are four more I'm sure you're familiar with:

"Poacher relish", "cosh pocket", "Cornish pasties" and "nonce". ;)


The second one I can take a wild guess at Beets, the last two should be well known, but Beets has me beat on the first one!


Ahhh! Sorry, Old Boy, I shouldn't have assumed. My appologies Old Chum!

"Poacher relish" is a kind of chutney that is specially made for using with game, especially if it's gone a trifle rich. Fortnum & Mason have been making various kinds of poacher (or game) relish for ages.

The "cosh pocket" is an inside left pocket on the jacket of a suit. It's a bit narrower and longer than the standard derivative you find in common suits. If you get a bespoke tailor to make you a suit, it'll have a cosh pocket along with the other, on the left side. It's called that because gentlemen in the old days used to carry a cosh with them for protection when they found themselves in the wrong neighbourhood. A cosh is a soft weapon made of a sock filled with metal pellets, ball bearings or marbles. It can make quite a dent on a mugger's skull.

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Message 465603 - Posted: 25 Nov 2006, 16:06:37 UTC - in response to Message 465602.

By Jove! I do believe you're right!


Awfully nice of you to say so, old fellow! :)

Dear Chap, too kind of you, you fully deserved it. :)


In appreciation, here are four more I'm sure you're familiar with:

"Poacher relish", "cosh pocket", "Cornish pasties" and "nonce". ;)


The second one I can take a wild guess at Beets, the last two should be well known, but Beets has me beat on the first one!


Ahhh! Sorry, Old Boy, I shouldn't have assumed. My appologies Old Chum!

"Poacher relish is a kind of chutney that is specially made for using with game, especially if it's gone a trifle rich. Fortnum & Mason have been making various kinds of poacher (or game) relish for ages.

The "cosh pocket" is an inside left pocket on the jacket of a suit. It's a bit narrower and longer than the standard derivative you find in common suits. If you get a bespoke tailor to make you a suit, it'll have a cosh pocket along with the other, on the left side. It's called that because gentlemen in the old days used to carry a cosh with them for protection when they found themselves in the wrong neighbourhood. A cosh is a soft weapon made of a sock filled with metal pellets, ball bearings or marble. It can make quite a dent on a mugger's skull.

The safe meanings and are not slang!
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Message 465606 - Posted: 25 Nov 2006, 16:10:07 UTC - in response to Message 465603.
Last modified: 25 Nov 2006, 16:12:48 UTC

By Jove! I do believe you're right!


Awfully nice of you to say so, old fellow! :)

Dear Chap, too kind of you, you fully deserved it. :)


In appreciation, here are four more I'm sure you're familiar with:

"Poacher relish", "cosh pocket", "Cornish pasties" and "nonce". ;)


The second one I can take a wild guess at Beets, the last two should be well known, but Beets has me beat on the first one!


Ahhh! Sorry, Old Boy, I shouldn't have assumed. My appologies Old Chum!

"Poacher relish is a kind of chutney that is specially made for using with game, especially if it's gone a trifle rich. Fortnum & Mason have been making various kinds of poacher (or game) relish for ages.

The "cosh pocket" is an inside left pocket on the jacket of a suit. It's a bit narrower and longer than the standard derivative you find in common suits. If you get a bespoke tailor to make you a suit, it'll have a cosh pocket along with the other, on the left side. It's called that because gentlemen in the old days used to carry a cosh with them for protection when they found themselves in the wrong neighbourhood. A cosh is a soft weapon made of a sock filled with metal pellets, ball bearings or marble. It can make quite a dent on a mugger's skull.

The safe meanings and are not slang!

Whatever do you mean? I speak English, not slang.

You'll have to enlighten us CA, in a general way, of course. What is the slang meaning of "poacher's relish", for example?

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Message 465643 - Posted: 25 Nov 2006, 16:56:16 UTC - in response to Message 464031.

Here in the USA we say, "throw in the towel" and in Commonwealth countries they say, "to spit the dummy."


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