Black Holes Have Hair!

Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Black Holes Have Hair!
Message board moderation

To post messages, you must log in.

AuthorMessage
Michael Watson

Send message
Joined: 7 Feb 08
Posts: 1335
Credit: 2,098,506
RAC: 5
Message 2096102 - Posted: 19 Mar 2022, 16:29:06 UTC
Last modified: 19 Mar 2022, 17:08:00 UTC

It appears they may have a solution to Dr. Stephen Hawkings' long-standing Black Hole information paradox. Dr. Hawking maintained that Black Holes eventually destroy information about their own formation.

This contradicted quantum mechanics, which holds that any physical process can be mathematically reversed, and, so, all information about it should, in principal, be discoverable. Never- the-less, Hawking made a good case for his thinking, and the paradox stood.

Now, scientists think that they've devised a way for the supposedly forever- lost information to be conserved, in traces in the gravity fields of black holes. Such traces are whimsically known to astrophysicists as 'hair' on a Black Hole.

This is not just about black holes, though. It also hints at a possible solution to the unworkable contradictions between relativity theory and quantum mechanics. Physicists have long sought a solution to this conundrum in the workings of Black Holes. If it all proves out and holds together, this might be the beginning of remarkable line of development in theoretical physics. Details available in the article, linked below:

https://www.sciencealert.com/physicists-think-they-ve-cracked-hawking-s-famous-paradox-using-quantum-hair
ID: 2096102 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Michael Watson

Send message
Joined: 7 Feb 08
Posts: 1335
Credit: 2,098,506
RAC: 5
Message 2096179 - Posted: 20 Mar 2022, 22:25:50 UTC

Even a verbal description of this solution to the black hole information paradox involves some pretty complex concepts, and interesting implications. To parse out a bit of it ---It's thought here that wormholes are the way that information eventually finds its way out of the interior of black holes.

Since it affects the black hole's gravity field, it's thought to also involve gravitons, or something else that carries the gravitational force. Further, that a number of black holes can be considered to be connected to one another by wormholes across bulk space. Bulk space is a spatial domain outside what we think of as 'normal space'.

This sounds rather like the idea of a wormhole 'subway' system entertained in science fiction, and specifically in Dr. Carl Sagan's novel 'Contact'. Incredible? maybe not. Dr.Sagan consulted with Dr. Kip Thorne, a physicist with expertise in such ideas, before including this concept in his story.
ID: 2096179 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Profile ML1
Volunteer moderator
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 25 Nov 01
Posts: 17105
Credit: 7,508,002
RAC: 20
United Kingdom
Message 2096219 - Posted: 21 Mar 2022, 18:01:49 UTC - in response to Message 2096179.  

Mmmm...

Not seen anything about black holes being in any way physically connected, other than that they share the same "physics".


I'll admit there is quite an entanglement of thoughts to try to appreciate the ideas of following a probability curve as you approach a black hole for when you might have passed over the event horizon, and then also allowing for how time slows to a standstill with respect to the rest of the universe as you make your approach...

Which comes to another brain twister:

If time slows to a standstill at the black hole's event horizon with respect to our observations from afar, how come we ever get see two black holes complete their merger in the first place?...


Keep searchin',
Martin
See new freedom: Mageia Linux
Take a look for yourself: Linux Format
The Future is what We all make IT (GPLv3)
ID: 2096219 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote

Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Black Holes Have Hair!


 
©2022 University of California
 
SETI@home and Astropulse are funded by grants from the National Science Foundation, NASA, and donations from SETI@home volunteers. AstroPulse is funded in part by the NSF through grant AST-0307956.