The death of a star captured.

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Message 2095929 - Posted: 16 Mar 2022, 20:58:37 UTC

Astronomers capture the moment a star explodes at the end of its life.

Astronomers have captured the moment a star, 500 million light years from Earth, exploded in a dramatic supernova, marking the end of its life.

A type II supernova explosion happens when a very large star can no longer fuse atoms within its core, causing it to explode, shedding off its outer layers.

The supernova, named SN2021afdx, happened in the unusually shaped Cartwheel Galaxy, which sits in the Sculptor constellation.

Astronomers captured the image in December 2021 using the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope (NTT) in Chile.

They then compared the image to one of the same galaxy, taken using the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in August 2014 - before the supernova explosion occurred.

A new, bright light can be seen in the lower left hand side of the new image, that isn't visible in the 2014 picture....
I hope that no extinctions happened during the event.

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Message 2101580 - Posted: 19 Jun 2022, 21:31:36 UTC

At 1.4 Million Mph, Astronomers Detected One of The Fastest Cosmic Objects of Its Kind.

When massive stars die, they don't do so quietly.

Their deaths are spectacularly brilliant affairs that light up the cosmos, a supernova explosion that sends star guts punching out into space in a cloud of splendor. Meanwhile, the core of the star-that-was can linger on, collapsed into an ultra-dense neutron star or black hole.

If that explosion takes place in a certain way, it can send the collapsed core barreling across the Milky Way like a bat out of hell, at such insane velocities they can eventually punch clean out of the galaxy altogether, on a wild journey into intergalactic space.

It's one of these objects that has been newly measured via data from the Chandra X-ray observatory: a type of pulsing neutron star known as a pulsar, ripping through its own entrails at a speed of around 612 kilometers per second (or 1.4 million miles per hour).

It's one of the fastest objects of this kind ever detected. (The fastest known star in the Milky Way is not a supernova remnant that has been kicked by an explosion, but a star orbiting Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole in the galactic center. At the fastest point in its orbit, it moves at a wild 24,000 kilometers per second.).....
I would sure hate to be in the way of that.

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Message 2104098 - Posted: 29 Jul 2022, 21:14:19 UTC

James Webb spots its first supernova.

A brilliant light detected by NASA’s James Webb Telescope (JWST) in a galaxy three billion light years from Earth is believed to be the $10 billion scope’s first observation of a dying star exploding.

Formally known as a supernova, it is the ‘last hurrah’ that occurs when the star runs out of fuel. This causes the pressure to drop, in which the cosmic object expands to at least five times the mass of our sun – which is the size of about 333,000 Earths – and then detonates, releasing tons of debris and particles.

The stellar explosion occurred in the galaxy, SDSS.J141930.11+5251593, where JWST snapped images showing the light of an object get dimmer of a span of five days - a clue that sparked the theory of a supernova.

What is additionally exciting is the fact that JWST was not designed to find and detect new transients, Mike Engesser of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), told Inverse that first reported on the discovery....
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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : The death of a star captured.


 
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