Other Stars Near Tabby's Star Show Similar Fading

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Michael Watson

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Message 2090877 - Posted: 25 Dec 2021, 23:26:27 UTC
Last modified: 25 Dec 2021, 23:42:41 UTC

After the odd, temporary, repeated fading of Tabby's star was noted, other stars exhibiting similar behavior were looked for. A number of such stars were eventually found. What's especially noteworthy here is that these stars are located comparatively close to Tabby's star, otherwise known as: KIC 8462852. Further, that they are are mostly of types F & G, similar to our Sun. Neither of these facts appear to have any ready astrophysical explanation.

A link to a video with further information about these observations is linked, below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSCN09SSRck
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Michael Watson

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Message 2091732 - Posted: 8 Jan 2022, 18:53:33 UTC
Last modified: 8 Jan 2022, 19:46:40 UTC

There is a recent follow-up article on the tight cluster of sun-like stars near Tabby's star, that show similarly difficult-to-explain 'slow-dipping' behavior. The astronomer quoted in the article ( Edward G. Schmidt, Univ. of Nebraska) suggests that these stars could represent evidence of interstellar expansion of a spacefaring civilization. Further, that they would be good candidates for SETI observations. The article contains a link to Prof. Schmidt's recent paper on these stars.

Article linked below:

https://www.news.com.au/technology/science/space/alien-megastructure-star-may-not-be-alone/news-story/20cea4a4bfe406d9507e1d5605b599d4
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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Other Stars Near Tabby's Star Show Similar Fading


 
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