Oumuamua

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Message 2064861 - Posted: 4 Jan 2021, 7:31:24 UTC

When the first sign of intelligent life first visits us from space, it won’t be a giant saucer hovering over New York. More likely, it will be an alien civilization’s trash.

Avi Loeb, the chair of Harvard’s Department of Astronomy, believes he’s already found some of that garbage.

In his upcoming book, “Extraterrestrial: The First Sign of Intelligent Life Beyond Earth” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), out Jan. 26, the professor lays out a compelling case for why an object that recently wandered into our solar system was not just another rock but actually a piece of alien technology.


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Message 2064862 - Posted: 4 Jan 2021, 7:33:40 UTC - in response to Message 2064861.  

Sorry the other thread was closed. Locked out yesterday, again sorry.
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Message 2068202 - Posted: 12 Feb 2021, 6:26:39 UTC - in response to Message 2064862.  

Sorry this is late. :-(

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-9169357/Harvard-physicist-digs-theory-interstellar-visitor-Oumuamu-alien-craft.html
So is it an alien spacecraft? Harvard physicist digs into his theory that the interstellar visitor Oumuamu is not a comet but uses an extraterrestrial propulsion system to fly through space
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Message 2068203 - Posted: 12 Feb 2021, 6:30:18 UTC - in response to Message 2064862.  

Sorry this is late. :-(

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-9169357/Harvard-physicist-digs-theory-interstellar-visitor-Oumuamu-alien-craft.html
So is it an alien spacecraft? Harvard physicist digs into his theory that the interstellar visitor Oumuamu is not a comet but uses an extraterrestrial propulsion system to fly through space

Harvard physicist Avi Loeb is not shy about his idea that Earth's 2017 interstellar visitor being an extraterrestrial craft and is set to release a book to defending his claim with more detail.

The book, titled 'Extraterrestrial: The First Sign of Intelligent Life Beyond Earth,' argues the consensus that Oumuamu is not a comet or asteroid, but a light sail – a method of spacecraft propulsion.

In a recent interview with Salon Loeb explains that Oumuamu exhibited excess push, which he believes comes from sunlight.

'So a light sail is just like a sail on a boat that reflects the wind, the wind is pushing it,' Loeb told Salon...
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Message 2068230 - Posted: 12 Feb 2021, 13:15:43 UTC - in response to Message 2068203.  
Last modified: 12 Feb 2021, 13:20:09 UTC

I doubt that the Mathematics surrounding gravity and the kinematical thrust of icy outgassing from comets would support such a nonsense theory. Am I correct that there is no picture of the object. On the face of it, why would an advanced civilization package up their garbage and attach it to an advanced propulsion system and then use another system to get it off of their planet in the first place. If it actually is quite apparent that it was not from the Oort cloud or the Kuiper belt then that would be enough excitement to attach to this object--without all of the other hype. We must separate the buffoons from the serious astronomers when there is an appetite for sensationalism and notoriety.
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Message 2068267 - Posted: 12 Feb 2021, 20:35:38 UTC - in response to Message 2068230.  
Last modified: 12 Feb 2021, 20:36:29 UTC

Indeed, there are no detailed photographs of the object beyond just the light intensity measured in a single pixel.

The shape is inferred from the observed light curves, and possibly from RADAR echos (Arecibo?)...


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Message 2075122 - Posted: 6 May 2021, 19:48:45 UTC - in response to Message 2068267.  

Indeed, there are no detailed photographs of the object beyond just the light intensity measured in a single pixel.

The shape is inferred from the observed light curves, and possibly from RADAR echos (Arecibo?)...

And...

More recent study(s) / simulation(s) suggest the best fit for the shape for Oumuamua is...

A roughened pancake-like disc of material.


There are some very good and plausible natural explanations for such a shape. Sorry, no "ET" needed for that one.


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Message 2075142 - Posted: 6 May 2021, 23:47:01 UTC - in response to Message 2075122.  
Last modified: 6 May 2021, 23:48:07 UTC

Yes, the shape of 'Oumuamua might conceivably have a natural explanation. I have not seen a satisfactory explanation, though, for how it was able the increase its expected speed, as it departed from the inner solar system.

Various cometary outgassing scenarios have been proposed, but none of them satisfactorily explain how 'Oumuamua is supposed to have provided the needed thrust without affecting the spin of the object.

I hasten to add that the gravitational effects of 'Oumuamua passing near the Sun, and the thrust obtainable from the Solar wind had already been allowed for. An additional amount of mysterious thrust would have been necessary to speed the object along, as was observed.
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Message 2075183 - Posted: 7 May 2021, 11:48:59 UTC - in response to Message 2075142.  

This object would be interesting just due to its ostensible origin from outside the solar system. It seems that the actual "observations" are based on scant data and much hype and speculation.
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Message 2075568 - Posted: 11 May 2021, 19:55:11 UTC
Last modified: 11 May 2021, 19:56:02 UTC

Here's a very good explanation and a good presentation:


Oumuamua Finally Explained Using a Brilliant Analysis


Looks good.

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Message 2093922 - Posted: 11 Feb 2022, 21:10:55 UTC
Last modified: 11 Feb 2022, 21:11:14 UTC

I guess that someone would come up with this.

A spacecraft could visit weird interloper 'Oumuamua. Here's how.

In 2017, a totally bizarre object zipped through the solar system. Nicknamed 'Oumuamua, this interstellar traveler was too far away and too speedy to be identified. Years later, scientists are still puzzling over what it might have been.

It's not too late to go see, according to a new research paper posted to the preprint website arXiv. By executing a complex maneuver around Jupiter, a spacecraft launched by 2028 could catch up with 'Oumuamua in 26 years.

"What we need is a photograph of it, very close, an in situ photograph," said lead author Adam Hibberd, a software engineer at the nonprofit Initiative for Interstellar Studies (i4is) in the United Kingdom. "And the only way we can do that is by sending a mission."

'Oumuamua was last seen zipping through the solar system at 57,000 mph (92,000 km/h). That velocity — and the object's acceleration around the sun — indicated that it came from outside the solar system. Theories for what it might have been proliferated. A chunk of nitrogen ice that snapped off of an "alien Pluto"? A clump of debris from a comet? A piece of alien technology?

'Oumuamua's passage also cued a flurry of ideas for how to send a probe to see the object firsthand. 'Oumuamua sped past Saturn's orbit in January 2019 and is estimated to be somewhere outside Neptune's orbit as of this year, headed toward the constellation Pegasus. Some of the ideas on how to chase 'Oumuamua down involved slingshotting a spacecraft around the sun, thus enabling a burst of speed without using much fuel. But such a solar maneuver would require heavy solar shielding, which would add weight and expense, Hibberd told Live Science.

Under i4is' "Project Lyra,'' Hibberd and his colleagues in the U.S. and Europe cooked up an alternative, known as a "Jupiter Oberth maneuver." A spacecraft would launch from Earth, and then swing around both Venus and Earth. This would get it to Jupiter with minimal fuel, Hibberd said. Once at Jupiter, the spacecraft would burn fuel to accelerate, allowing it to slingshot past Jupiter toward 'Oumuamua at about 82,800 mph (133,200 km/h). Jupiter wouldn't give as much of a gravitational assist as the sun, Hibberd said, but it could still get the job done.

"Jupiter has one-thousandth the mass of the sun — so it's much less massive — and you don't get quite as much, to use the expression, 'bang for your buck,' but you do get there at fairly high speed," he said.

Whether any such mission will ever happen is an open question. Hibberd and his colleagues submitted a white paper to NASA's Decadal Survey, which queries the space community every 10 years for mission ideas and priorities.

"We'll see what comes of that white paper," Hibberd said. "We're trying to get encouragement from the scientific community — after all, it would solve a lot of their questions."
Cheers.
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Message 2099037 - Posted: 6 May 2022, 8:57:04 UTC

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Message boards : SETI@home Science : Oumuamua


 
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