Profits 1st, Safety 2nd? Pt 2

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Profile Gary Charpentier Crowdfunding Project Donor*Special Project $75 donorSpecial Project $250 donor
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Message 2121391 - Posted: 23 Jun 2023, 13:22:10 UTC

At least no one can say the greedy CEO didn't believe his own hype.
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Message 2121428 - Posted: 24 Jun 2023, 10:52:56 UTC

"We have heard the baseless cries of 'you are going to kill someone' way too often," he wrote. "I take this as a serious personal insult."
Wonder what he says to St Peter at the pearly gates
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Message 2121429 - Posted: 24 Jun 2023, 11:05:09 UTC - in response to Message 2121428.  

"I plead guilty to one count of suicide and four counts of corporate manslaughter" ?
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Message 2121430 - Posted: 24 Jun 2023, 11:07:06 UTC - in response to Message 2121429.  

Well, he won't be in "absentia" up there.
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Message 2121484 - Posted: 25 Jun 2023, 5:39:56 UTC

The rescue mission of OceanGate’s Titan submersible is likely to cost millions, but it is unclear who will have to pay the massive bill.

The failed rescue of the Titan submersible – which imploded with five people on board – is likely to cost millions, but it is unclear who will have to pay the massive bill.

Spanish news site AS.com reports the US, Canada and France were involved in the ongoing operation.

All three countries contributed to several planes, boats, and subs in the search for the missing passengers who took a dive to see the Titanic’s wreckage.

The US used resources such as three C-17 transport planes belonging to the US army and an aquatic drone.

Canada had a patrol plane and two surface boats, and one of which had doctors who specialised in diving medicine that arrived on the scene on Thursday.

France contributed a ship equipped with a remotely-operated vehicle.

According to the outlet, the extensive search mission will cost over $6.5 million.....
Yet there are still those who expect bodies to be recovered.

Well they can forget that right now as there are 2 schools of thought on this.

1/ During the initial milliseconds of collapse enough heat would've been generated to cremate the bodies instantly.

2/ The cremation process wouldn't had long enough to do that job before the pressure of the water totally liquefied them.

Either way there'll be no bodies retrieved and they wouldn't have known what hit them.
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Message 2121487 - Posted: 25 Jun 2023, 6:31:22 UTC - in response to Message 2121484.  

I've seen that nonsense about the temperature before. Theory says so. Proponent forgot to check the volume that the air would have been compacted to to reach that temperature. This is where the nonsense begins and should end. One must remember the human body is mostly water and water doesn't compress in volume when subject to pressure like a gas does. The body isn't going to get smaller. So you end up with a pinhead size air bubble that is very hot in the middle of ice cold water. One must also remember for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. So the water rushing in will get colder by an equal energy amount. The heat of the small hot air bubble will quickly be absorbed by the ice cold water. Cremation isn't happening.

Sorry for the physics lesson.
What will happen is the high velocity of the in-rushing water, likely filled with shrapnel, will rip the flesh off the bones before splintering them. What is left won't be recognizable as human remains.

This is only 14.7 PSI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zz95_VvTxZM deep sea many times more violent.
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Message 2121489 - Posted: 25 Jun 2023, 6:48:47 UTC

Yeah I'm in the class of them being just slightly singed before being liquidised by the weight of the Empire State building hitting their bodies from all directions at once. Yes sure shrapnel would've sped up the process, though not by very much, but in the end they would've become part of the ocean water almost instantly anyway.
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Message 2121490 - Posted: 25 Jun 2023, 6:50:52 UTC - in response to Message 2121487.  

As Gary explains, no cremation, just shredding and crushing (there are some sizeable gas pockets in a human body so there will be some crushing) all happening "instantly" - no time to scream.
Bob Smith
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Message 2121491 - Posted: 25 Jun 2023, 7:38:56 UTC

I was struck by a news report I read yesterday describing what had been found by the ROV. It said that the two titanium end-caps of the pressure vessel (hemispherical) were seen largely intact, but there was no sign of the carbon fibre cylinder that should have fitted between them - just minute shards of carbon fibre scatted over the sea bed.

I had envisioned the human remains being contained within a squashed, flattened version of that cylinder - but with carbon shards travelling at high speed, they'll be mincemeat at best.

(so much has been written, so fast, that I can no longer find the original report - it's been buried under newer reports, including versions of the cremation theory)
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Message 2121494 - Posted: 25 Jun 2023, 10:25:09 UTC

One comment I've seen (Scott Manley) is that the energy released by the implosion at that depth is equivalent to exploding about 50kg of TNT.

Whether singed by the rapid temperature increase of the instantly collapsing air space, or torn apart by shock waves, or shredded by shards of carbon fibre, or otherwise instantly crushed:

That's the sort of extremely rapid extreme combination where even fragments of flesh and bone are extremely unlikely to be recoverable.


Having now seen the carbon fibre construction used, my opinion is that that tech for that application was simply ignorantly foolhardy reckless.

Swim safely!
Martin
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Message 2121517 - Posted: 25 Jun 2023, 16:32:54 UTC

I can recall 2 shocking events (one I actually heard & felt).
The Apollo 1 cabin fire in Feb 1967 then 8 years later Moorgate in Feb 1975.
Was pulling into Moorgate on the Circle Line when the accident happened.
Not sure if any passenger felt it but railway staff did.

Nothing man made is 100% safe & never will be. There will always be some risk.
The Titan sub was untested & not certified.
Arrogance killed those men.
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Message 2121528 - Posted: 25 Jun 2023, 17:22:04 UTC

Shades of Top Gun.
Maverick
After his son also raised fears about the sub, Jay Bloom declined Mr Rush's invitation.

A very sensible father that listened to his son.
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Message 2121533 - Posted: 25 Jun 2023, 18:00:15 UTC
Last modified: 25 Jun 2023, 18:03:58 UTC

We've had various names for this over recent years including the euphemisms of "Care.Data" and "NHS Digital" and others along the way...

A new name has reared up through the multiple ashes of predecessors to be called: "FDP".

Are we now yet again to soon sell all our UK medical data off to the USA and others:


Mega-data platform worth half a billion will suck in info from family doctors
wrote:
UK officials argue NHS patient details will only be available locally

A UK health minister has for the first time admitted that information from family doctors is set to be uploaded to the controversial Federated Data Platform (FDP), a set of technologies under a £480 million procurement for which US spy-tech company Palantir is the incumbent supplier...

... Therefore, the FDP will have the capability to ingest local primary care [GP] data...

... Physically, the data will be held by the cloud provider – currently AWS – in its datacenters...

... In the run-up to the expected start of the FDP procurement, in fact delayed until January, the official line was cloud and software providers would be able to access the data for technical reasons...

... tech companies would be considered data processors "engaged under legally binding contracts..." ...



Just for one disturbing example:

Our medical data is to be held by USA companies, beholden to and abiding by their particular state laws, for which all data is open to scrutiny. For some of that data about individuals, there are punitive laws against the UK ways of medicine.

Abortion is one example. There are others... And there are "business opportunities" to be exploited...

... Thence step foot into a USA controlled area to never return?...


To my view, this is an abomination in the making...

Harangue your MP?...


Stay healthy?!
Martin
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Message 2121534 - Posted: 25 Jun 2023, 18:25:08 UTC - in response to Message 2121533.  

It's been heading that way for some time.
Not sure about other city councils, but ours has gone over to the cloud a few years ago.
In fact so has some of our housing associations.
All based in London (so far).
As for MP's?
Waste of time.
We've had ours ignored by bureaucrats in a round robin of wasted time & effort.
They're becoming a law unto themselves.
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Message 2121538 - Posted: 25 Jun 2023, 19:07:15 UTC - in response to Message 2121533.  

... A UK health minister has for the first time admitted that information from family doctors is set to be uploaded to the controversial Federated Data Platform (FDP)...

I think they forgot to mention - Once it's "in the cloud" it's available to just about any hackers and any foreign government that really wants access to the data.

To paraphrase the old Las Vegas saying - "Once it's on the internet, it's always on the internet."
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Message 2121542 - Posted: 25 Jun 2023, 21:52:29 UTC - in response to Message 2121491.  
Last modified: 25 Jun 2023, 21:53:42 UTC

I was struck by a news report I read yesterday describing what had been found by the ROV. It said that the two titanium end-caps of the pressure vessel (hemispherical) were seen largely intact, but there was no sign of the carbon fibre cylinder that should have fitted between them - just minute shards of carbon fibre scatted over the sea bed.
Very telling. Sounds like the maximum number of cycles was exceeded. There is no way to test the integrity of a part made of carbon fiber. You can't x-ray it. You can't use dye penetrant. The flaws you are looking for are likely too small to pick up on ultrasound. I can also see a very likely way for it to fail. Any micro crack on the surface taken to depth will force a drop of water into the weave. That water will have dissolved gas. When it comes back up the pressure now inside the carbon fiber will be greater than outside causing the crack to spread. Next cycle there is even more room in the cracks causing an ever increasing amount of internal damage. Eventually leading to a fracture propagating faster than the speed of sound. That's assuming it didn't happen where the carbon fiber was glued to the titanium end cap. Easy for the glue to fail and allow water into the end of the tube weave and over a few cycles destroy any strength it had.

Never mind the construction I saw was dumb beyond belief. Carbon fiber is strong in one direction only. When you build a part you lay the weave in many directions so the part has strength in many directions. The tube was all woven in a single direction.

Didn't SpaceX have some issue with a COPV and liquid penetrating into the carbon wrap?
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Message 2121588 - Posted: 26 Jun 2023, 18:05:19 UTC

This is a big loophole the USA Federal Courts need to catch up on:


A son died, his parents tried to sue. How U.S. courts protect Big Pharma
wrote:
Merck’s best-selling asthma medicine, Singulair, has been linked for years to suicides and psychiatric problems, often in children. But lawsuits over the drug are stymied by one of Corporate America’s most effective liability shields...

... less than two weeks after he started taking an allergy medicine that had been linked for years to episodes of depression and suicidal thinking...

... Nicholas had no history of mental-health problems...

... were shocked to learn from legal advisers that they had no case. Like countless other potential plaintiffs...

... no legal remedy at all...

... essentially barred lawsuits against generic drugmakers based on state laws that enabled claims over design defects or a failure to warn consumers of potential dangers. The court’s reasoning: ... federal regulations preventing generic drugmakers, when copying name-brand drugs, from changing the formulation or the warning label. That meant Merck had written the warning label, with federal approval, on the generic version of Singulair that Nicholas England took. But his parents couldn’t sue Merck, either, because their son had never taken its name-brand version of Singulair...

... The high court’s ban on certain lawsuits against generic drug manufacturers has extraordinary reach because generics account for 91% of U.S. prescriptions...

... Pending lawsuits against Merck allege that the company’s own early research indicated the drug could impact the brain but that Merck downplayed any risks in statements to regulators...

... Singulair, one of the best-selling drugs in U.S. history, has provided Merck with about $50 billion in revenue, company disclosures show. Since Merck’s patent on Singulair expired in 2012, major generic drug manufacturers have sold millions of prescriptions under the drug’s scientific name, montelukast...




That's one big loophole to guarantee deadly profits...

Stay healthy!
Martin
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Message 2121726 - Posted: 28 Jun 2023, 21:14:12 UTC

Debris from implosion of Titanic-bound submersible returned to land.

..The return of the debris to port in St John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, is a key piece of the investigation into why the submersible imploded, killing all five on board.

Twisted chunks of the near 7-metre submersible came ashore at a Canadian Coast Guard pier on Wednesday.

Horizon Arctic, a Canadian ship, carried a remotely operated vehicle, or ROV, to search the ocean floor near the Titanic wreck for pieces of the submersible.

Pelagic Research Services, a company with offices in Massachusetts and New York that owns the ROV, said in a statement on Wednesday that it has completed offshore operations.

Pelagic Research Services said its team is "still on mission" and cannot comment on the ongoing Titan investigation, which involves several government agencies in the US and Canada......
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Message 2121738 - Posted: 28 Jun 2023, 22:49:09 UTC - in response to Message 2121726.  
Last modified: 28 Jun 2023, 22:49:32 UTC

Don't ya just luv the journo luvvies to needlessly sensationalize...


The parts glimpsed thus far have looked completely not twisted at all.

Notably, the titanium parts looked to be completely intact.


One to follow further yet...
Martin
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Message 2121748 - Posted: 29 Jun 2023, 0:59:00 UTC

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Message boards : Politics : Profits 1st, Safety 2nd? Pt 2


 
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