Profits 1st, Safety 2nd? Pt 2

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Message 2019848 - Posted: 21 Nov 2019, 0:32:29 UTC
Last modified: 21 Nov 2019, 0:35:47 UTC

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Message 2019879 - Posted: 21 Nov 2019, 5:58:15 UTC

Martin sometimes you get so fixated on a point that your peripheral vision suffers and that has proven to be very bad for both pilots and motorcyclists. ;-)

Cheers.
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Message 2019882 - Posted: 21 Nov 2019, 6:08:47 UTC - in response to Message 2019879.  

Martin sometimes you get so fixated on a point that your peripheral vision suffers and that has proven to be very bad for both pilots and motorcyclists. ;-)

I would add that also applies to debugging code, or systems.

I know in debugging you never toss out a fact when it doesn't fit your pet theory. If you do you fix the wrong thing and frequently make it worse.
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Message 2020385 - Posted: 24 Nov 2019, 15:20:23 UTC

The snowball has started rolling...
...how long before it reaches the bottom?
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Message 2020400 - Posted: 24 Nov 2019, 16:42:37 UTC

I'm surprised its taken them this long to decide.
Bob Smith
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Somewhere in the (un)known Universe?
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Message 2020403 - Posted: 24 Nov 2019, 16:57:06 UTC - in response to Message 2020400.  

Well, they were just waiting for some politician to give them the green light to avoid paying corporation tax. :-)
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Message 2020687 - Posted: 27 Nov 2019, 0:26:09 UTC
Last modified: 27 Nov 2019, 0:28:35 UTC

Here's a forthright discussion that echoes some of my concerns against Boeing's MCAS 'fix' for their 737 Max:

Transport Canada safety official urges removal of MCAS from 737 Max

Removing MCAS from the 737 Max is "how to get some confidence back to us all that we as Authorities can sleep at night when that day comes when the MAX returns to service."...



Note especially the flowcharts at the end of the article... There is yet some serious safety work yet to be cleared...

As the disastrous consequences have unfolded, the 737 Max should never have been flying as it was...

All at what cost?... Especially so for the human cost...


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Message 2020785 - Posted: 27 Nov 2019, 16:54:17 UTC - in response to Message 2020687.  

Just confirmation for what I've previously stated. At this time, the FAA is no longer the de facto authority for the worlds air transportation safety. Boeing has a long road ahead for itself...
...and they only have themselves to blame.
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Message 2021458 - Posted: 2 Dec 2019, 20:06:08 UTC
Last modified: 2 Dec 2019, 20:06:32 UTC

Is this where the FAA make a comeback?

At the very least, to my personal most ignorantly humble opinion, this looks to be a very damning ouch against Boeing's 'way of working':


FAA to Individually Inspect Hundreds of New Boeing 737 Max Planes

... The FAA wrote to Boeing in a letter Tuesday that a "large number of new 737 Max airplanes currently in storage presents a number of challenges for airworthiness certification, production and delivery..." NBC News reported.

The FAA will no longer authorize Boeing to inspect its own aircraft, perform pre-delivery safety checks and signoff on the Max planes, a process Boeing has long been in charge of.

"The FAA has determined that the public interest and safety in air commerce require that the FAA retain authority to issue airworthiness certificates and export certificates of airworthiness for all 737 Max airplanes," the FAA's letter stated, according to NBC. "The FAA will retain such authority until the agency is confident that, at a minimum, Boeing has fully functional quality control and verification processes in place; delivery processes are similarly functional and stable; and Boeing's 737 Max compliance, design, and production processes meet all regulatory standards and conditions for delegation and ensure the safety of the public."...




Now... Whatever happened to all those QA staff that Boeing 'let go'?...

Also, is there any further news for the MCAS discussions and certification??


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Message 2021469 - Posted: 2 Dec 2019, 23:18:46 UTC - in response to Message 2021458.  

Now... Whatever happened to all those QA staff that Boeing 'let go'?...
Boeing will soon regret that decision when the FAA ground each individual aircraft until it is made airworthy before it is certified. :-)
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Message 2021514 - Posted: 3 Dec 2019, 6:00:27 UTC - in response to Message 2021469.  

Now... Whatever happened to all those QA staff that Boeing 'let go'?...
Boeing will soon regret that decision when the FAA ground each individual aircraft until it is made airworthy before it is certified. :-)

It is all noise for the public. They will before the first inspection declare that Boeing has effective Q/C in place and run back to DC and their houses.
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Message 2021537 - Posted: 3 Dec 2019, 11:55:55 UTC - in response to Message 2021514.  

It is all noise for the public. They will before the first inspection declare that Boeing has effective Q/C in place and run back to DC and their houses.
Until the noise of another 737Max hitting the ground occurs.
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Message 2022006 - Posted: 7 Dec 2019, 3:51:46 UTC

If a plane makes it up into the air, there is one component above all others that if there is a failure, will always end badly.

The wings.

FAA seeks $3.9 million fine from Boeing for defective parts on 737 NG planes
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said on Friday it seeks to impose a $3.9 million fine on Boeing Co, alleging it failed to prevent the installation of defective parts on about 130 737 NG airplanes.

The FAA alleged that Boeing “failed to adequately oversee its suppliers to ensure they complied with the company’s quality assurance system ... Boeing knowingly submitted aircraft for final FAA airworthiness certification after determining that the parts could not be used due to a failed strength test.”

In a statement on Friday, Boeing did not admit liability but said they were aware of the FAA’s concerns.

“We are working closely with our customers to take the appropriate corrective actions,” spokesman Charles Bickers said.

The company has 30 days to respond either by paying the fine or challenging it; Boeing said it would review the penalty.
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Message 2022132 - Posted: 7 Dec 2019, 16:22:07 UTC - in response to Message 2022006.  

FAA seeks $3.9 million fine from Boeing for defective parts on 737 NG planes
The FAA alleged that Boeing “failed to adequately oversee its suppliers to ensure they complied with the company’s quality assurance system ...
Sounds just like the they treated the software supplier for the MCAS software.
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Message 2022552 - Posted: 9 Dec 2019, 23:45:03 UTC

Choices, hmm, which thread - Profits, Shocking or Don't know where.
The trial called Excel started in 2010 and was sponsored by big US stent maker, Abbott.
"It is a matter of serious concern to us that some results in the Excel trial appear to have been concealed and that some patients may therefore have received the wrong clinical advice," Prof Domenico Pagano, EACTS secretary general, said.
Surgeons withdraw support for heart disease guidelines
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Message 2022554 - Posted: 9 Dec 2019, 23:53:23 UTC

Wonder if anything new will come out of this.

House Transportation Committee; Full Committee Hearing on “The Boeing 737 MAX: Examining the Design, Development, and Marketing of the Aircraft”
Date: Wednesday, October 30, 2019
Time: 10:00 AM
Location: Rayburn House Office Building, Room 2167


Testimony of Ed Pierson, former senior production manager, on the quality of build, could be interesting.
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Message 2022557 - Posted: 10 Dec 2019, 0:19:02 UTC - in response to Message 2022554.  

The 1st 30 minutes is interesting. At 5 hrs 35 min 02 sec, downloading it to watch in segments.
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Message 2022855 - Posted: 12 Dec 2019, 9:19:55 UTC

Important testimony to congress:

Boeing: US regulator admits 'mistake' over aircraft crashes

"FAA chief Steve Dickson said this was a mistake."
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Message 2023262 - Posted: 16 Dec 2019, 0:35:59 UTC

The latest snippets on the sorry deadly saga of the Boeing 737 Max:


Southwest Airlines reaches settlement with Boeing over damages from 737 Max grounding

Southwest Airlines on Thursday said it has reached an agreement with Boeing over some of the financial damages it is seeking from the costly prolonged grounding of the 737 Max.

The airline did not release terms of the confidential agreement but said it will contribute approximately $125 million to its employee profit sharing plan as a result...

... Southwest CEO Gary Kelly has previously vowed to share some of the proceeds with the airline's workers...

... The Dallas-based carrier had 34 planes at the time of the grounding, more than any U.S. airline, with plans to add many more this year and beyond...

... The airline said additional settlement talks with Boeing are ongoing.

Separate from the airline's talks with Boeing, Southwest pilots sued the plane maker in October. They says the steep reduction in flights has cost the airline's nearly 10,000 pilots an estimated $115 million in compensation.



FAA let Boeing 737 Max continue to fly even as review found serious crash risk

US regulators allowed Boeing’s 737 Max to keep flying even after their own analysis found the plane could have averaged one fatal crash about every two or three years without intervention...

... An FAA spokesperson told the Wall Street Journal, which first reported the news: “It was clear from the beginning that an unsafe condition existed.”...

... “The FAA rolled the dice on the safety of the traveling public and let the Max continue to fly until Boeing could overhaul its MCAS software.”...



As 737 MAX’s return slips out to mid-February, FAA boss tells Boeing CEO to back off predictions

In a starkly direct rebuke to Boeing, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) chief Steve Dickson met with company CEO Dennis Muilenburg at FAA headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Thursday and told him to pull back on public statements about an imminent return to service for the 737 MAX — a milestone that people close to the details now say is unlikely to happen before mid-February...

... Among the issues that have caused the latest delay is some confusion over pilot checklists that emerged during four days of testing in Seattle a week ago, when Boeing ran pilots from various airlines through a series of emergency flight scenarios to test the “human factors” elements of the new flight control system, including the crew workload...

... “The Administrator is concerned that Boeing continues to pursue a return-to-service schedule that is not realistic due to delays that have accumulated for a variety of reasons,” the email states. “More concerning, the Administrator wants to directly address the perception that some of Boeing’s public statements have been designed to force FAA into taking quicker action.”

“The Administrator wants to make clear that both FAA and Boeing must take the time to get this process right...



Why you won't fly on a 737 Max again for quite some time

Nobody knows for sure when Boeing will be able to secure approval to return the 737 Max to the skies. What's certain is no passengers will fly in a 737 Max for quite some time...

... [And] Once the plane is approved to fly again by the FAA, it will still take months of additional pilot training before most of the planes are flying again on US routes...

... Boeing has said it anticipates delays in getting those new 737 Max plains in the air will stretch into 2021.
Part of that delay is because the airlines aren't ready to accept hundreds of additional planes at one time. But it is also because the FAA now plans to inspect each aircraft, rather than letting Boeing perform the pre-delivery checks as it has in the past...




All a deadly game of (Boeing and FAA) Management deadly unaware of consequences...

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Martin
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Message 2023263 - Posted: 16 Dec 2019, 0:43:02 UTC - in response to Message 2023262.  

As 737 MAX’s return slips out to mid-February, FAA boss tells Boeing CEO to back off predictions

In a starkly direct rebuke to Boeing, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) chief Steve Dickson met with company CEO Dennis Muilenburg at FAA headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Thursday and told him to pull back on public statements about an imminent return to service for the 737 MAX — a milestone that people close to the details now say is unlikely to happen before mid-February...

... Among the issues that have caused the latest delay is some confusion over pilot checklists that emerged during four days of testing in Seattle a week ago, when Boeing ran pilots from various airlines through a series of emergency flight scenarios to test the “human factors” elements of the new flight control system, including the crew workload...

... “The Administrator is concerned that Boeing continues to pursue a return-to-service schedule that is not realistic due to delays that have accumulated for a variety of reasons,” the email states. “More concerning, the Administrator wants to directly address the perception that some of Boeing’s public statements have been designed to force FAA into taking quicker action.”

“The Administrator wants to make clear that both FAA and Boeing must take the time to get this process right...
From what has been seen from the aviation authorities of the rest of the world that only applies to the US. Boeing & the FAA can have some fun in attempting to get it flying outside of the US.
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Message boards : Politics : Profits 1st, Safety 2nd? Pt 2


 
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