Coronavirus, Ebola and Infectious diseases, Food & Drugs, Studies, Recalls #6

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Sirius B Project Donor
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Message 2058018 - Posted: 1 Oct 2020, 21:10:45 UTC - in response to Message 2057982.  

There is the aspect of what the 'general population' will do...
So much for the "General" public
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Message 2058152 - Posted: 3 Oct 2020, 2:15:43 UTC

Well the last reporting period saw the total case count pass 34.8 million while deaths pass 1,032,700. The U.S. put in another big day well passing 7.5 million cases and 213,500 deaths. India leapt past 6.4 million cases and the 3rd country to record over 100,000 deaths. Brazil is fast approaching 4.9 million cases and passed 145,000 deaths. Even though Russia is still in a safe 4th place they're picking up the pace as they fast approach 1.2 million cases and pass 21,000 deaths while the Spanish Inquisition carry on in their merry way in the next 5 places. Now back down list where most of the action still is.

Due to some missing numbers yesterday I'll just cut to the upwards movers today.

Slovakia has moved up into 97th place while Malaysia took 95th, Myanmar has leapt into 88th as Tunisia makes its first move into the next pack and into 83rd, Hungary is now in 76th and Lebanon took over 65th place. Meanwhile Moldova moved into 58th spot as Czechia leapt into 48th and Nepal moved into 46th while Poland took 41st place.

The Netherlands is now in 31st while Morocco moved into 30th, the Philippines took over 20th as Iraq took 15th place and the U.K. leapt into 12th.

France is still running hot in a big "no man's land", but is there going to be enough in the kettle to stay on the boil? Argentina still shows no signs of slowing down as they continue to close in on Spain.

Now we wait to see what the weekend brings with it.
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Message 2058237 - Posted: 3 Oct 2020, 21:56:35 UTC

The UK has done some realignment of its 'total cases' so the increase from yesterday is 12,872, but today's 'new cases' is actually 7,070. more details at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-54404561
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Message 2058239 - Posted: 3 Oct 2020, 22:32:01 UTC - in response to Message 2058237.  
Last modified: 3 Oct 2020, 22:42:22 UTC

The UK has done some realignment of its 'total cases' so the increase from yesterday is 12,872, but today's 'new cases' is actually 7,070. more details at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-54404561
Yes there's a notice included with today's entries.

7,070 new cases and 49 new deaths in the United Kingdom. NOTE: the 12,871 cases reported today included a backlog, which Worldometer has redistributed historically based on the testing date information provided for the 10,806 cases reported by England today and the official note provided by the UK Government: "Due to a technical issue, which has now been resolved, there has been a delay in publishing a number of COVID-19 cases to the dashboard in England. This means the total reported over the coming days will include some additional cases from the period between 24 September and 1 October, increasing the number of cases reported."
Here's a little update.

Spain became the 7th country to pass 800,000 cases while France became the 11th to pass 600,000 and Germany became the 22nd to pass 300,000.
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Message 2058268 - Posted: 4 Oct 2020, 9:43:40 UTC

I don't think anyone has considered in depth how people actually get infected. Case in point is the White House situation this week.
Mulraney recognised the difficulties faced by the government but pointed out that Prof Leitch recently said "allowing 600 fans into a stadium that holds 60,000 outside, all facing the same way, is probably far less risky than letting people into a restaurant or an aeroplane".
I know that football/soccer is not everybody's cup of tea but this report does highlight how shambolic matters are.
Covid & Sports
I was watching Match of the Day last night & one thing caught my eye during one of the games: NO fans in stadium yet the game was still policed.
What a waste of resources!
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Message 2058281 - Posted: 4 Oct 2020, 14:45:43 UTC - in response to Message 2058268.  
Last modified: 4 Oct 2020, 14:49:12 UTC

I don't think anyone has considered in depth how people actually get infected...

I think they (researchers/medics) have...

And to avoid 'public panic' and 'fearfulness' beyond what we already have, politically the transmission of the coronavirus by aerosols has been almost 'hushed up'...

A 2m (12' in USA-speak) decency zone is a good guess to avoid the inevitable natural spittle that people unavoidably eject whilst talking or even just having their mouths open.

However for aerosols, think more of small smoke particles lazily drifting on the air currents, or for how far away you can smell stale sweaty socks, or a lone old fashioned smoker...


Essentially, anyone with COVID-19 (or any other respiratory virus) will pass infection on to everyone else in an enclosed space.

The gamble is for what viral loading (time exposed and distance/concentration) the victims receive...

You're then onto the next level of gambling for how snotty a nose you naturally have (innate immune response) and for how healthily you can shrug off the virus attack...


Stay safe!
Martin
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Message 2058285 - Posted: 4 Oct 2020, 15:24:35 UTC - in response to Message 2058281.  

I don't think anyone has considered in depth how people actually get infected...
I think they (researchers/medics) have...
They've studied the science to the nth degree. Laser scanning of aerosol clouds, biochemical assays, computer simulations - they've thrown the whole pack of cards at it.

But I don't think the scientists (or the politicians, come to that) can fully account for human stupidity. That Scottish MP who got on a train after getting a positive test result, those Australian private security guards who got too friendly with their charges, that American President who refuses to wear a mask and encourages everyone else to imitate him - science can't model that.
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Message 2058288 - Posted: 4 Oct 2020, 16:07:14 UTC

As Richard says the way aerosols move in air is quite well understood and has been for many years.
Human stupidity should be assumed to be approaching unity - every time I've gone shopping, or been near shops, recently I've seen people with no face masks, being ejected from shops and long queues waiting to get in.
The things that are currently poorly understood is just how infective the virus is, and how long it remains infective in air and on surfaces. (Obviously the latter will depend to an extent on the nature of the surface so a range of surface types have to be considered.)
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Message 2058293 - Posted: 4 Oct 2020, 16:17:45 UTC - in response to Message 2058268.  

I don't think anyone has considered in depth how people actually get infected. Case in point is the White House situation this week.
Mulraney recognised the difficulties faced by the government but pointed out that Prof Leitch recently said "allowing 600 fans into a stadium that holds 60,000 outside, all facing the same way, is probably far less risky than letting people into a restaurant or an aeroplane".
I know that football/soccer is not everybody's cup of tea but this report does highlight how shambolic matters are.

Look at the pictures of the Rose Garden super spreader event. Everyone facing the same way.
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Message 2058305 - Posted: 4 Oct 2020, 17:40:31 UTC

While facing in the same direction does reduce the infection rate in a static environment, the moving in/out of seat, while being a shorter time can be a much bigger source of infection (I doubt that they did the stage-in/out for getting in place).
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Message 2058307 - Posted: 4 Oct 2020, 17:45:31 UTC - in response to Message 2058285.  
Last modified: 4 Oct 2020, 17:45:51 UTC

I don't think anyone has considered in depth how people actually get infected...
I think they (researchers/medics) have...
They've studied the science to the nth degree. Laser scanning of aerosol clouds, biochemical assays, computer simulations - they've thrown the whole pack of cards at it.

But I don't think the scientists (or the politicians, come to that) can fully account for human stupidity. That Scottish MP who got on a train after getting a positive test result, those Australian private security guards who got too friendly with their charges, that American President who refuses to wear a mask and encourages everyone else to imitate him - science can't model that.

At least one Republican that agree's with you.
“There was a panic before this started, but now we’re sort of the stupid party,” said Edward J. Rollins, co-chairman of the pro-Trump super PAC Great America.
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Message 2058322 - Posted: 4 Oct 2020, 20:28:06 UTC - in response to Message 2058293.  

I don't think anyone has considered in depth how people actually get infected. Case in point is the White House situation this week.
Mulraney recognised the difficulties faced by the government but pointed out that Prof Leitch recently said "allowing 600 fans into a stadium that holds 60,000 outside, all facing the same way, is probably far less risky than letting people into a restaurant or an aeroplane".
I know that football/soccer is not everybody's cup of tea but this report does highlight how shambolic matters are.

Look at the pictures of the Rose Garden super spreader event. Everyone facing the same way.
150 in a much smaller area
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Message 2058329 - Posted: 4 Oct 2020, 21:55:14 UTC
Last modified: 4 Oct 2020, 21:56:50 UTC

UK figures still being adjusted. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-54412581 I think UK will pass the 500,000 mark.
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Message 2058342 - Posted: 5 Oct 2020, 1:50:11 UTC

Since my last post the world total known case count has passed 35.3 million cases and 1,041,500 deaths.

Well Finland has yet again moved back into 101st place, but this time they maybe able to progress a few spots before being overtaken by the next up and comer Georgia (currently in 110th, but closing fast), Slovakia has moved up into 95th place while Jordan is now in 89th as Myanmar claimed 86th and is about to attack the next pack of countries. Tunisia meanwhile has slipped into 80th place as Kenya moved back into 69th and Austria took up the lead of its pack as well as 62nd spot.

Czechia is now in 47th place as Poland takes over 40th while passing 100,000 cases, but Oman just beat them to become 39th to join that club, Belgium has jumped into 32nd place while the Netherlands takes 30th and Indonesia became the 23rd country to pass 300,000 cases while displacing Germany from 22nd spot, Iran finishes the moves off by taking 13th spot from Chile.

From there on up the gaps are getting much wider to bridge as France is still days from removing South Africa for the top 10, though depending on what numbers Spain will put in will depend on whether Peru retains 6th place (the next 24hrs will tell). Other than that the U.K. became the 12th country to pass 500,000 cases.

Tomorrow should prove interesting so don't move that dial.
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Message 2058366 - Posted: 5 Oct 2020, 12:07:29 UTC - in response to Message 2058329.  

UK figures still being adjusted. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-54412581 I think UK will pass the 500,000 mark.
It now says (may be a late edit):

It was caused by some data files reporting positive test results exceeding the maximum file size.
A bug which will be familiar to many BOINC users, but should never take a whole week to be spotted, identified, and fixed.
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Message 2058370 - Posted: 5 Oct 2020, 12:33:07 UTC - in response to Message 2058369.  

Never ever trust Government IT. Written by idiots for idiots, and pedalled by corrupt agencies.
I think I'd trust Government IT more than I'd trust "Government contracted out to the cheapest 'Gimme a job. I could do that' supplier" IT.

In any event, bugs can happen in any programming environment: the question is the responsiveness of the support desk. I think my record is about 10 minutes - but only after about 18 months of waiting and head-scratching, while many people reported it, but we couldn't reproduce it in the office until somebody gave us the critical clue in their report.

"File size too big" is not in that category.
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Message 2058388 - Posted: 5 Oct 2020, 16:05:34 UTC

Argh - it's worse even than that. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-54422505 - read the 'analysis' section, after the political apologia.

Basically, stupid business-school use of Excel as a database, instead of SQL, Oracle, or even Access. And I doubt they've even heard of ODBC.
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Message 2058390 - Posted: 5 Oct 2020, 16:40:15 UTC

People who use Excel as a database should be suspended by their fingernails (or any other suitably pain-sensitive part of their anatomy) for a few hours.
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Message 2058392 - Posted: 5 Oct 2020, 17:44:50 UTC
Last modified: 5 Oct 2020, 17:46:04 UTC

Export formats available:
.xls
.csv

"I've never heard of a csv but I know what an xls is"

Face Palm
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Message 2058397 - Posted: 5 Oct 2020, 18:47:15 UTC - in response to Message 2058392.  
Last modified: 5 Oct 2020, 19:01:02 UTC

Apparently, the raw data was captured in the field as text (I'm reading CSV there), but "several lines per patient", which is screaming 'database' at me.

Then, the text files were imported into excel templates, for onward transmission. That's where it all fell over - it (silently?) hit the limit of 64K rows per sheet. Yup, that's an .xls file limit, not a spreadsheet limit.

Edit - OK, the spreadsheet itself is limited to 64K in Office 2003, but that was increased to 1,048,576 rows in Office 2007. Remember that the NHS has been on austerity rations for upgrades since the bankers lost (stole?) all the money in 2008.
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Message boards : Politics : Coronavirus, Ebola and Infectious diseases, Food & Drugs, Studies, Recalls #6


 
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