CPU Frq. reporting on an Android Device

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JLDun
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Message 1989193 - Posted: 7 Apr 2019, 20:04:34 UTC
Last modified: 7 Apr 2019, 20:10:41 UTC

1508 of 1001 MHz? I doubt over-clocking is an issue here, since it's non-root Android....



EDIT: It's an 8-core, the other cores ARE 1508's, and CPU-Z sees this sometimes, too.
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Message 1989272 - Posted: 8 Apr 2019, 12:31:59 UTC

How hot are the batteries getting?
I will stop procrastinating tomorrow.
\\// Live Long & Prosper (starting tomorrow ;)
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Message 1990292 - Posted: 16 Apr 2019, 19:49:51 UTC - in response to Message 1989272.  
Last modified: 16 Apr 2019, 19:55:40 UTC

Currently around 105-107°F. ( Have two of the same model; the 105 is currently running 2 WCG- and plugged in- and the 107 is Einstein x4.)

EDIT: And this is while sitting outside with 80° ambient.
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Message 1990354 - Posted: 17 Apr 2019, 8:13:38 UTC - in response to Message 1989193.  

Most Android devices have a high clock and a low clock. The low clock speed is used for near idle operations, and most third party apps, things that don't need a high clock speed. The high clock speed is used by apps and background services that need priority, usually those of the operating system. It's used in bursts because of the Achilles Heals of all Android devices: heat and no good way to get rid of it, and using CPUs at full speed uses more energy thus the battery is empty earlier.

An octocore CPU usually consists of four BIG CPU cores that are used by the operating system only, these can reach the highest speeds. The other four are so-called LITTLE CPU cores, which are used by the day by day operations. And by BOINC. If you have an octocore CPU with four LITTLE and four BIG cores, BOINC can only use the LITTLE cores. Even when you set BOINC to use 8 cores, it'll just run two tasks on each of the four LITTLE cores. There is no option built into BOINC yet to utilize the BIG cores.

In your case, the CPU cores can run at max 1,508 MHz, but when running idle they run at 1,001 MHz. That's what the 1,508/1,001 means. The divider '/' doesn't mean 'of' but the high and low frequency values. I bet there are even frequencies in between that you can see when monitoring.
Jord

According to Giorgo of the Ancient Astronaut Theorists I do not help with tech questions via private message. He's right: please use the forums for that.
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Message 1990544 - Posted: 18 Apr 2019, 20:18:55 UTC - in response to Message 1990354.  

The thing is, while most of those 4 cores do list frequencies under 1001, including sometimes 0/1001, the one I'm concerned about sometimes goes 'up' to 1508/1001(the /1001 in this case is always present/always '/1001'.). [And the other 4 cores not shown in the image have listings of 'nn/1508', including the occasional 0/1508.


The tl;DR version: since the '/1001' part doesn't change, I'm reading that as a (reported) 'hard' limit for that cpu and am wondering about it appearing to go above 1001 occasionally interms of actual activity.
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Message boards : Number crunching : CPU Frq. reporting on an Android Device


 
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