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Sirius B Project Donor
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Message 2069804 - Posted: 3 Mar 2021, 13:55:31 UTC

I wonder what those graphs would be like had we remained?
EU in trouble
One comment surprised me even though I couldn't stop laughing.
Can't mention it (against forums rules - so read the article), gotta love the German Finance minister. :-)
Don't think Mis Merkel gives a monkey as she in gone in 6 months.
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Message 2069912 - Posted: 4 Mar 2021, 13:37:47 UTC

Now that the UK is no longer in the EU, US suspends tariffs on single malt Scotch whisky.
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Message 2069931 - Posted: 4 Mar 2021, 19:19:47 UTC - in response to Message 2069912.  

It's a start & this will be another nail in the coffin for the EU.
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Message 2069938 - Posted: 4 Mar 2021, 20:13:27 UTC - in response to Message 2069931.  

It's a start & this will be another nail in the coffin for the EU.
That would be a breach of contact so I guess that we'll just manufacture more than the contracted 50 million doses here. ;-)
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Message 2069939 - Posted: 4 Mar 2021, 20:17:05 UTC

Both sides are at it. Companies are selling more than they can produce, and countries (notably ours) are buying more than they need. Lots of so called "contracts" are going to be argued over by lawyers for decades to come.
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Message 2069947 - Posted: 4 Mar 2021, 21:50:58 UTC - in response to Message 2069939.  

Both sides are at it. Companies are selling more than they can produce, and countries (notably ours) are buying more than they need. Lots of so called "contracts" are going to be argued over by lawyers for decades to come.

The UK has ordered more than it needs, but that assumes, to a certain extent, that they all work. Most of the orders were made before the trials started, probably as a measure to prevent the companies running out of funds, think Valneva. Lots of support from Macron there, for a French company I see, not.

Where would the UK vaccination program be now if the Oxford/Astrazeneca had proved to be a dud.
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Message 2070977 - Posted: 17 Mar 2021, 18:33:39 UTC - in response to Message 2067679.  

In the months preceding the vote to leave the EU I was in a number of meetings with very senior Eurocrats and their general attitude was along the lines "We are the greatest club the world has ever seen, and if GB has the timerity our club we will punish them". In meetings after the vote the attitude was "Now you are leaving we will make sure life is very difficult for you".......
(And this was non-elected Eurocrats, never mind the members of the EU parliament & commission who were even nastier.)
No let up then
Q: Where do failed politicians retire to?
A: Brussels.
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Message 2074413 - Posted: 28 Apr 2021, 12:28:36 UTC

Done deal
Lord Frost's opposite number in the Brexit talks, Michel Barnier, was also less than flattering. "This is a divorce. It is a warning, Brexit. It's a failure of the European Union and we have to learn lessons from it," he told MEPs.
Well my dear Michel, you can always marry (a) Turkey.
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Message 2074545 - Posted: 29 Apr 2021, 18:36:07 UTC

An Italian MEP has apologised to Britain for the treatment it received over Brexit, praising the UK's vaccine roll-out and future prosperity in a withering attack on the EU.
'The UK humiliated us,' Antonio Maria Rinaldi told the European Parliament today.
'I learned that the European Union has sued the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca. We hope that the lawyers in charge are not the same ones who formulated the contracts last year!
'Why is the Commission not using some very good London law firm this time? They would be sure to win,' he added.

The European Parliament debated Brexit for the final time on Tuesday ahead of the EU's formal ratification of the Withdrawal Agreement.
Many MEPs fired parting shots at Britain, following Ursula von der Leyen's lead after she warned Boris Johnson that the Bloc 'will not hesitate' to take action if there are any breaches to the Brexit trade deal.
But Rinaldi, a former banker and member of the Eurosceptic Lega party, poured scorn on the 'disgusting lies' told about Britain, 'a great and proud country.'
It comes as Von der Leyen's Commission announced it was suing AstraZeneca over vaccine shortfalls, the latest development in a furious row that has seen European leaders bitterly attack Britain for having secured more doses.

Britain has administered at least one vaccine dose to more than half the population, while just 20 per cent of EU citizens have had a first dose.
Rinaldi, a professor of economics, argued that now was 'an excellent opportunity' for the EU to admit its folly and commit to reform, particularly in its financial governance.
He lamented the 'swamps of regulations and bureaucracy' in Brussels, adding: 'I want to bet here in front of you all that in two years Britain's growth will be much higher than that of the European Union.'
The 66-year-old continued: 'It took five years to finally reach this agreement having for too long knowingly ignored that the United Kingdom is a net buyer of goods and services to the Union,' Rinaldi told the house.
'Where I come from the customer is always right... But maybe those dealing with Brexit didn't know?
Are the walls crumbling?
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Message 2074556 - Posted: 29 Apr 2021, 20:54:03 UTC - in response to Message 2074545.  

As an outsider my impressiion of the EU on Brexit is that the EU intends to punish GB as much as possible. I always thought the common market was a good idea the EU not so much. It has some good features and others which many find intolerable.
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Message 2074557 - Posted: 29 Apr 2021, 21:12:39 UTC - in response to Message 2074556.  

As an outsider my impressiion of the EU on Brexit is that the EU intends to punish GB as much as possible. I always thought the common market was a good idea the EU not so much. It has some good features and others which many find intolerable.
I'm not sure they originally meant to go that far, but they were certainly determined to make sure that nobody could see the UK getting a positive advantage from leaving - not least, because that might encourage other member states to try the same thing.

As time has passed, British governments have changed, and changed their negotiating stance, and the pandemic has intervened to get in the way of everything. I wouldn't be surprised to find that they are (a) exhausted, and (b) exasperated. If that comes across as a desire to punish, I think that is only predictable. Europeans are human beings too: we would be complaining and seeking retaliation if the EU had initiated a process to kick us out.
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Message 2074587 - Posted: 30 Apr 2021, 9:51:07 UTC

Never thought I would actually hear anything like this.
Gexit on the cards?
The question now is: Will I actually see it happen?
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Message 2075980 - Posted: 16 May 2021, 13:32:22 UTC

From the Telegraph,
British silversmiths struggling to sell in EU after Brexit deal failed to recognise UK's hallmarks
Sir John Hayes says it is 'preposterous' that centuries-old hallmarks are not recognised by the European Union
British silversmiths are being frustrated over trying to sell silver and gold into the European Union after the Brexit trade deal failed to recognise the UK’s centuries-old hallmarks.

The UK has one of the most rigorous systems of quality validation in the world, requiring a Maker’s mark, year, and an Assay Office mark on every item.

However, hallmarking was overlooked in the Brexit trade deal which has meant that UK silversmiths are finding it difficult to export British silver and gold into the EU. The problems also affect jewellry.

This is despite British silversmiths still adhering to the identical international ISO and BSO standards that the EU recognised until the end of December last year.

Sir John Hayes, chairman of the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Craft, called for the 1973 Hallmarking Act to be amended to protect UK producers.

He said it was “preposterous” that UK hallmarks should not be recognised by the European Union.

He said: “We need to challenge the basis for EU non-recognition of British marks – one of the highest quality British standards in the world.

“This is a centuries-old tradition. There is no concession required from the EU. It can only be an oversight or awkwardness. This is an important industry for Britain.”

The hallmark allows each piece of silver to be traceable back to a single workbench, in the same way that meat can be traced back to a particular herd on a farm.

The current legal operating standard for “Sterling” silver has not changed since 1275 and hallmarking has been required by law in this country since 1320.

UK goods can be recognised if makers pay for an additional “Convention Mark”, or “Common Control Mark” which was first set out in the 1972 Vienna Hallmarking Convention.

However, only 16 EU countries are signatories, and major UK markets including France, Spain, Belgium and Italy are not covered.

The Government said the problems did not affect any silver or gold on the market before Jan 1 this year. Any new stock entering the GB market will require a UK hallmark or Common Control Mark while any new stock exported to EU members will require a mark recognised by those countries.

A spokesperson said: “While the UK secured a number of sector-specific annexes as part of the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) offer, it was not possible to reach agreement with the EU on the UK’s proposal for a Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) on conformity assessment. The UK Government’s focus is on implementing the deal helping prepare businesses for upcoming opportunities."

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2021/05/15/british-silversmiths-struggling-sell-eu-brexit-deal-failed-recognise/
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Message 2076674 - Posted: 26 May 2021, 23:40:49 UTC

Has Brexit opened the door?
Problems with EU
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Message 2078726 - Posted: 27 Jun 2021, 4:57:51 UTC

Amazing what Brexit gets blame for.
This has been brewing for the past decade...at least, if not longer.
A shortage of 100,000 lorry drivers means supermarkets may have limited stock on the shelves this summer.
It comes after the huge impact of both Brexit and the coronavirus pandemic over the last 15 months.
Summer shortages ahead
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Message 2080528 - Posted: 21 Jul 2021, 7:54:55 UTC

Priti pays £54M of taxpayers money to the French to do their jobs.
So much for the EU's Dublin Protocol.
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Message 2086465 - Posted: 19 Oct 2021, 16:04:09 UTC

The Rule of Law.
just four words, but haven't they caused many a debate & division that have caused major issues, not only among those within the same country but nations v nations.
Case in point
But Lithuanian President Gitanas Nauseda said linking issues about the rule of law to funding risked inflicting "unimaginable harm to European Union unity".
He's from a small piddling little country so the "big boys" won't listen to him.
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Message boards : Politics : BREXIT


 
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