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Richard Haselgrove Project Donor
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Message 2074557 - Posted: 29 Apr 2021, 21:12:39 UTC - in response to Message 2074556.  

As an outsider my impressiion of the EU on Brexit is that the EU intends to punish GB as much as possible. I always thought the common market was a good idea the EU not so much. It has some good features and others which many find intolerable.
I'm not sure they originally meant to go that far, but they were certainly determined to make sure that nobody could see the UK getting a positive advantage from leaving - not least, because that might encourage other member states to try the same thing.

As time has passed, British governments have changed, and changed their negotiating stance, and the pandemic has intervened to get in the way of everything. I wouldn't be surprised to find that they are (a) exhausted, and (b) exasperated. If that comes across as a desire to punish, I think that is only predictable. Europeans are human beings too: we would be complaining and seeking retaliation if the EU had initiated a process to kick us out.
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Sirius B Project Donor
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Message 2074587 - Posted: 30 Apr 2021, 9:51:07 UTC

Never thought I would actually hear anything like this.
Gexit on the cards?
The question now is: Will I actually see it happen?
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Message 2075980 - Posted: 16 May 2021, 13:32:22 UTC

From the Telegraph,
British silversmiths struggling to sell in EU after Brexit deal failed to recognise UK's hallmarks
Sir John Hayes says it is 'preposterous' that centuries-old hallmarks are not recognised by the European Union
British silversmiths are being frustrated over trying to sell silver and gold into the European Union after the Brexit trade deal failed to recognise the UK’s centuries-old hallmarks.

The UK has one of the most rigorous systems of quality validation in the world, requiring a Maker’s mark, year, and an Assay Office mark on every item.

However, hallmarking was overlooked in the Brexit trade deal which has meant that UK silversmiths are finding it difficult to export British silver and gold into the EU. The problems also affect jewellry.

This is despite British silversmiths still adhering to the identical international ISO and BSO standards that the EU recognised until the end of December last year.

Sir John Hayes, chairman of the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Craft, called for the 1973 Hallmarking Act to be amended to protect UK producers.

He said it was “preposterous” that UK hallmarks should not be recognised by the European Union.

He said: “We need to challenge the basis for EU non-recognition of British marks – one of the highest quality British standards in the world.

“This is a centuries-old tradition. There is no concession required from the EU. It can only be an oversight or awkwardness. This is an important industry for Britain.”

The hallmark allows each piece of silver to be traceable back to a single workbench, in the same way that meat can be traced back to a particular herd on a farm.

The current legal operating standard for “Sterling” silver has not changed since 1275 and hallmarking has been required by law in this country since 1320.

UK goods can be recognised if makers pay for an additional “Convention Mark”, or “Common Control Mark” which was first set out in the 1972 Vienna Hallmarking Convention.

However, only 16 EU countries are signatories, and major UK markets including France, Spain, Belgium and Italy are not covered.

The Government said the problems did not affect any silver or gold on the market before Jan 1 this year. Any new stock entering the GB market will require a UK hallmark or Common Control Mark while any new stock exported to EU members will require a mark recognised by those countries.

A spokesperson said: “While the UK secured a number of sector-specific annexes as part of the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) offer, it was not possible to reach agreement with the EU on the UK’s proposal for a Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) on conformity assessment. The UK Government’s focus is on implementing the deal helping prepare businesses for upcoming opportunities."

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2021/05/15/british-silversmiths-struggling-sell-eu-brexit-deal-failed-recognise/
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Message 2076674 - Posted: 26 May 2021, 23:40:49 UTC

Has Brexit opened the door?
Problems with EU
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Message 2078726 - Posted: 27 Jun 2021, 4:57:51 UTC

Amazing what Brexit gets blame for.
This has been brewing for the past decade...at least, if not longer.
A shortage of 100,000 lorry drivers means supermarkets may have limited stock on the shelves this summer.
It comes after the huge impact of both Brexit and the coronavirus pandemic over the last 15 months.
Summer shortages ahead
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Message 2080528 - Posted: 21 Jul 2021, 7:54:55 UTC

Priti pays £54M of taxpayers money to the French to do their jobs.
So much for the EU's Dublin Protocol.
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Message 2086465 - Posted: 19 Oct 2021, 16:04:09 UTC

The Rule of Law.
just four words, but haven't they caused many a debate & division that have caused major issues, not only among those within the same country but nations v nations.
Case in point
But Lithuanian President Gitanas Nauseda said linking issues about the rule of law to funding risked inflicting "unimaginable harm to European Union unity".
He's from a small piddling little country so the "big boys" won't listen to him.
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Message 2106547 - Posted: 8 Sep 2022, 12:53:09 UTC

The longest & most expensive Poker final has drawn to a close.
The EU is folding
But the focus now is on finding a European solution. And not a few EU figures, French President Emmanuel Macron included, have said they'd love the UK to be part of a plan.
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Message boards : Politics : BREXIT


 
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