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Message 1890882 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 7:17:37 UTC - in response to Message 1890881.  

My main worry right now is that the company that I called, and who sent someone here while the person was on the way to fix a refrigeration problem elsewhere, only to find a clogged a/c A frame, now does not want to return unless I accept their request that I lets them install a new gas furnace, one that I still have no income for payments or enough money to pay for, on Wednesday I'm going to call them and find out when they are going to come back out here to take that a/c part out of My gas furnace. I say request as they kept bringing up the idea of installing a new unit, I told them how much I get per month, and how much that I have available for this, I have an extra amount beyond the $300.00, but that is for My rent check, I guess some just think I have lots more money, that I must be rich, or something.

I know I could put up My notes, and some would say you are a liar, without any proof, I'm not a liar, I wish I were rich, then everything I need would be paid for, and someone would I imagine be getting paid to help. but I've been poor all My life as has My family, including My cousin whose wife has alzheimers.



I've already been accused by a person of intentionally breaking two leg bones, the Doctors said it was a clean break, I even have scars on both sides of My ankle, I'm due an apology by that person, that person is lucky I'm poor, cause otherwise I'd contact a lawyer and sue Him into the grave for slander, defamation of character, and maybe even character assassination, all would be civil or even small claims court. Maybe that someone should, but I doubt He will...
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Message 1890886 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 8:42:22 UTC - in response to Message 1890881.  

There's probably more money in it for them installing a new furnace than repairing an old one.
Sitting a few thousand miles away I can picture the scenario:
They've sent a guy out to fix the problems as described by you, the customer, and find not only that problem but a number of others that make the proposed repair a non-starter, so they suggest that the best way forward is to replace the old furnace with a new one as that is better for their finances than sending out a stream of guys to replace this bit, then that bit, then the other. You, the customer feels shafted because nobody has explained to you the whole stack of problems with your thirty year old furnace. You the customer has no money to fund the new furnace, but, if the repairs of your old furnace amounted to more than the $300 you've budgeted for (via your sister-in-law) you can't afford to have it repaired.

All this ignores the fact that there may be a legal issue with them repairing your old furnace, such as a design issue, or a (major) change in the law that results in it being illegal to repair, but not illegal to use while it is working....

You are, in effect, caught in the classical cleft stick situation - whatever you do (or they do) it's going to hurt :-(
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Message 1890925 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 14:05:07 UTC
Last modified: 20 Sep 2017, 14:13:19 UTC

The oil burning furnace in my home is the original Bard installed when the home was built in 1954. So it is 63 years old. They don't make 'em like that anymore.
I have little doubt that if I had it professionally serviced, they would try to tell me it has to be replaced.
However, I service it myself. Replaced the oil burner unit itself many years ago, change the nozzle, check the air adjustment, replace the air filters if needed, check the heat exchanger with a smoke bomb (no leaks so far..........), and check the final exhaust going to the chimney with smoke test kit...same thing the professionals use.
I have had to replace the flue pipe from the heat exchanger to the chimney a few times. They tend to corrode from the acids in the exhaust, but I can readily get replacement pipe from Meownards when needed, it's not anything specific to this furnace.
I actually have not run it for a few years, other than for testing, as my crunchers supply enough heat to keep the water pipes thawed except on very very cold winter nights. I actually added Sta-Bil for fuel oil to the oil tank, as I am not using much of it. And then I am usually running an electric heater to keep the bedroom warm for me and the kitties. But I still test fire and check the old furnace every fall just so I know it is ready to use if desired or needed. I also invested in a couple of CO alarms as a safety precaution just in case there would be a sudden failure or break in the heat exchanger due to it's age.
At some point I shall get it replaced and have central AC added when I do.
But for now, it is still serviceable and safe to fire up.

Meow!
"Freedom is just Chaos, with better lighting." Alan Dean Foster

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Message 1890935 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 14:37:27 UTC - in response to Message 1890930.  
Last modified: 20 Sep 2017, 14:49:39 UTC

However, I service it myself. Replaced the oil burner unit itself many years ago, change the nozzle, check the air adjustment, check the heat exchanger with a smoke bomb (no leaks so far..........), and check the final exhaust going to the chimney with smoke test kit...same thing the professionals use.

I have had to replace the flue pipe from the heat exchanger to the chimney a few times. They tend to corrode from the acids in the exhaust, but I can readily get replacement pipe from Meownards when needed, it's not anything specific to this furnace. But I still test fire and check the old furnace every fall just so I know it is ready to use if desired or needed. I also invested in a couple of CO alarms as a safety precaution just in case there would be a sudden failure or break in the heat exchanger
That is exactly what I mean by being technically competent. In the UK oil burning systems are quite common in rural areas, in the main towns and cities it's all gas fired these days.

The majority of home here are gas heated as well.
Back in the 80's (I bought the home in 1980), there was a big push by the gas company to convert old oil furnaces to gas. They offered big discounts and rebates to replace furnaces, and if you did not have a gas line to your home, they would actually install the lateral from the street at no charge!! LOL. Not anymore.

I am very thankful that I can work on my furnace myself.
It is good to have those skills.
It has saved me at least several thousand dollars over the years!!

Meow!!
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Message 1890938 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 15:15:20 UTC - in response to Message 1890886.  
Last modified: 20 Sep 2017, 15:46:19 UTC

There's probably more money in it for them installing a new furnace than repairing an old one.
Sitting a few thousand miles away I can picture the scenario:
They've sent a guy out to fix the problems as described by you, the customer, and find not only that problem but a number of others that make the proposed repair a non-starter, so they suggest that the best way forward is to replace the old furnace with a new one as that is better for their finances than sending out a stream of guys to replace this bit, then that bit, then the other. You, the customer feels shafted because nobody has explained to you the whole stack of problems with your thirty year old furnace. You the customer has no money to fund the new furnace, but, if the repairs of your old furnace amounted to more than the $300 you've budgeted for (via your sister-in-law) you can't afford to have it repaired.

All this ignores the fact that there may be a legal issue with them repairing your old furnace, such as a design issue, or a (major) change in the law that results in it being illegal to repair, but not illegal to use while it is working....

You are, in effect, caught in the classical cleft stick situation - whatever you do (or they do) it's going to hurt :-(

Rob, I have disagree with you here, but, the furnace only has one problem, besides being old, and that is a clogged a/c A frame, that's what the repair guy said, He even pulled out a tuft for Me to see, otherwise the furnace is in good shape for being old.

An a/c A frame sits in the air stream that the furnace uses, beyond that I won't say.
The A frame, looks like this, and is the cause of the furnace not shutting off, it's also not being used, since the condenser unit that would sit outside the house, is gone, missing.

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Message 1890940 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 15:21:09 UTC - in response to Message 1890930.  
Last modified: 20 Sep 2017, 15:47:38 UTC

However, I service it myself. Replaced the oil burner unit itself many years ago, change the nozzle, check the air adjustment, check the heat exchanger with a smoke bomb (no leaks so far..........), and check the final exhaust going to the chimney with smoke test kit...same thing the professionals use.

I have had to replace the flue pipe from the heat exchanger to the chimney a few times. They tend to corrode from the acids in the exhaust, but I can readily get replacement pipe from Meownards when needed, it's not anything specific to this furnace. But I still test fire and check the old furnace every fall just so I know it is ready to use if desired or needed. I also invested in a couple of CO alarms as a safety precaution just in case there would be a sudden failure or break in the heat exchanger
That is exactly what I mean by being technically competent. In the UK oil burning systems are quite common in rural areas, in the main towns and cities it's all gas fired these days.

Here there is a mixture of natural gas, if one is lucky, or propane gas tanks, propane uses different fittings, but is otherwise I think nearly identical to natural gas, natural gas is delivered by pipeline, propane is delivered by truck and pumped into a cylindrical tank, I don't know much about propane beyond this, so I won't speculate. Oil furnaces I have very little knowledge of.

In the park everyone uses natural gas.
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Message 1890943 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 15:43:21 UTC - in response to Message 1890883.  

In the UK, we used to have Corgi Registered gas installers, now we have the Gas Safe Register. They all have to go through training to get their accreditation. If during the course of their work they come across a faulty gas appliance that cannot be repaired, or the owner cannot or chooses not to repair it. Then there are two courses of action.

If an installation is classified as ‘immediately dangerous’ it is considered to be an immediate danger to life and property if left operating. The installation will be disconnected with your permission, and cannot be used until remedial work has been carried out to repair the defect(s). Continuing to use an immediately dangerous appliance could endanger lives.

Should you refuse them permission to disconnect the installation or appliance and the appliance runs on natural gas, the gas engineer will report the situation to the Gas Emergency Service Provider (ESP). The ESP has legal powers of entry to make the situation safe, and are also able to disconnect the gas supply to the property. However, this does not apply to Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) installations.


There are different rules for rented properties

Your landlord must arrange a gas safety check every 12 months. Only Gas Safe registered engineers are allowed to inspect or do repairs on gas appliances in your home. ... They can disconnect faulty equipment and arrange for your gas supply to be cut off.

Gas Safe rules

I don't know what the rules are in the USA. I believe Vic's furnace is 30 years old, in the UK that would likely have a do not use notice put on it, pending repairs or replacement. What must be worrying for Vic is that if that happens, he cannot afford to pay for a new furnace. In view of his age and disabilities, one would have thought that with winter approaching, there must be some sort of State or Government emergency funding somewhere for situations like this. I'm sure Vic will be looking into it. Not good news.

If there is, I've never heard of one, there is one group who supposedly will repair a system, or maybe replace it, but the catch is, the system must not be working at all, otherwise they will do nothing, I gave up battering My proverbial head against the proverbial wall on that.

This manufactured home was made in 1987, in a factory, and is a Fleetwood Westfield, is 13.5'x60' in size or 810sqft, the company that made My place went bankrupt in 2009, I bought the place used in 2006 in North Las Vegas NV, had the place setup here, as that was as far as My limited inheritance money would go back then.

As to rented properties, I only rent the land, the manufactured home is one that I alone own, with no mortgage, and pay property taxes on. So the 'landlord' is under no such requirement here, normally a heater/furnace will be worked on if there is a problem, anything beyond that waits for the renter(a tenant) moves out, I'm not a tenant, I'm a resident.

Some people decry safety regulations in the name of profit, and think no one will be hurt, or lose anything, the owner loses the use of His/Her property after a fire, in a mobile home park I don't know how the replacement process works, and the renter is now homeless and may have lost everything in the fire, and I don't want to go into insurance.
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Message 1890948 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 16:04:10 UTC - in response to Message 1890945.  

I am very thankful that I can work on my furnace myself.
It is good to have those skills.
It has saved me at least several thousand dollars over the years!!
To be fair, Vic is not so fortunate.

it's also not being used, since the condenser unit that would sit outside the house, is gone, missing.
That has not been mentioned before, how did that happen?

In the UK propane gas is generally used for holiday homes and caravans, not for permanent living places.

We have what we call Residential Parks, and retirement Lodges, a typical one is here. They usually have piped natural gas, mains sewage, and mains electricity. Park homes

Where did the condenser go?

That's not a simple answer.

The a/c system used a type of freon that is no longer made, the condenser was obsolete, and since the condenser was not attached to the system, and would be expensive to run, considering how inefficient the old system was, the condenser had no value, except as scrap metal, so the condenser was traded for labor/parts on a repair here at one time, that got Me the newer blower for the furnace, the park was scrapping several places in the park under a previous park owner. The guy who did that is no longer around here.

Which is why I have an LG 10,000 Btu window a/c unit, instead of an a/c system that is integrated with the furnace, which cools roughly 405sqft, as that was all that I could get, and the a/c unit was new, an energy efficient unit, a yellow tag came with the unit.
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Message 1890957 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 16:25:56 UTC - in response to Message 1890945.  
Last modified: 20 Sep 2017, 16:54:54 UTC

I am very thankful that I can work on my furnace myself.
It is good to have those skills.
It has saved me at least several thousand dollars over the years!!
To be fair, Vic is not so fortunate.

I wouldn't call it exactly 'fortunate', Chris.
When I was younger, I studied handyman books and such. And when there was something that I wanted to do, I would find out how. Sometimes I could find a kind adult that knew how to do a job, and they would share their knowledge with me. Sometimes, I would go to the library and find a book about the task. Also read many magazines with how-to articles.
People today are much more fortunate. With the internet, you can usually have the information at your fingertips in an instant. Back then, you had to look a bit harder to find it. Now, you can often even find videos on youtube with people SHOWING you how to tackle a task. Such as replacing a garbage disposal. Here is a vid of a lady telling you how, step by step.

I have over the years, replaced the drain lines on the bathroom and kitchen sinks, both sets of faucets, and the kitchen sink itself. Rebuilt the faucets for the tub. So, I guess I am a neophyte plumber.
I've replaced most light switches with automatic occupancy sensing ones, they turn the lights out automatically. Replaced many old receptacles with new ones. Replaced two electric hot water heaters. Repaired a fractured pipe in the basement that was spraying water all about. Plumbed a water line for the ice maker when I got a new fridge.

In 37 years, I've replaced the toilet flush valve I don't know how many times. And the wax ring once.
Helped upgrade my electrical service box. An out of work friend electrician installed the box and the mains connections. I finished the job and installed all of the new breakers myself. All done to code. I also added a 240v 50a subfeed box to power my Seti crunchers years later. I am an electrician by trade. Although never certified to do work for other people, I worked with a licensed master electrician for several years as an apprentice. And now I wire fire trucks for a living.

I've maintained all of my automobiles. Everything from air cleaner and spark plug and tire changes, to water pumps, alternators, timing chains, a camshaft, v and serpentine belts, valve cover gaskets, carbeurators, fuel injectors, thermostats, an intake manifold, heater hoses, radiators, more than a few exhaust systems, and a power steering pump. Couple of ball joints, many starters, batteries, and installed a new engine in my little RX7. Once installed a lower A frame in one of my Buick Electra boats out on a residential street when the ball joint failed and left the tire sitting at a rather inopportune angle. Factory manuals are sooooooooooooooo helpful! So, I guess that makes me a motorhead as well.

Helped re-shingle the roof a number of years back, replaced door locksets a few times, my window air conditioner several times, caulked the cracks, cleaned and sealed the gutters, replaced stove burner elements and a couple of broken windows. I guess that makes me a homeowner.

I also studied many aspects of kitty husbandry, cared for one cat through her battle with CRF, another through her battle with cancer, and nursed a third through her final senior years until it was time for her to go. So I am better equipped these days to properly care for my kitties.
But I do not think that begins to make me a vet.

I could not begin to add up the money I have saved all these years by being a man who, when he is determined to do something, gets down to brass tacks and begins to learn how.

Meowtinkertinker.
"Freedom is just Chaos, with better lighting." Alan Dean Foster

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Message 1890969 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 16:50:08 UTC - in response to Message 1890940.  

Propane is a hydrocarbon (C3H8) which is gas at normal temperature and liquefies under fairly low pressure (about 100pisa).
Methane is the main component of natural gas (or at least after purification), it is also a hydrocarbon (CH4). It is the lightest hydrocarbon, and is a gas at normal temperatures, it requires a much higher pressure to liquefy it (something in the region of 1000psia).
For domestic use both have strongly smelling chemicals added as otherwise leaks & spills would be very difficult to detect without special equipment. Their "natural" smell is a faint, sweet petroleum smell which the human nose is very good at filtering out so after prolonged exposure to low concentrations people stop smelling it which is not a good situation to be in - there have been a number of accidents caused by this over the years. Both are easy to ignite, and have wide explosive concentration ranges (somewhere between 1% and 20% from memory).
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Message 1891002 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 19:05:14 UTC - in response to Message 1890957.  
Last modified: 20 Sep 2017, 19:08:03 UTC

I am very thankful that I can work on my furnace myself.
It is good to have those skills.
It has saved me at least several thousand dollars over the years!!
To be fair, Vic is not so fortunate.

I wouldn't call it exactly 'fortunate', Chris.
When I was younger, I studied handyman books and such. And when there was something that I wanted to do, I would find out how. Sometimes I could find a kind adult that knew how to do a job, and they would share their knowledge with me. Sometimes, I would go to the library and find a book about the task. Also read many magazines with how-to articles.
People today are much more fortunate. With the internet, you can usually have the information at your fingertips in an instant. Back then, you had to look a bit harder to find it. Now, you can often even find videos on youtube with people SHOWING you how to tackle a task. Such as replacing a garbage disposal. Here is a vid of a lady telling you how, step by step.

I have over the years, replaced the drain lines on the bathroom and kitchen sinks, both sets of faucets, and the kitchen sink itself. Rebuilt the faucets for the tub. So, I guess I am a neophyte plumber.
I've replaced most light switches with automatic occupancy sensing ones, they turn the lights out automatically. Replaced many old receptacles with new ones. Replaced two electric hot water heaters. Repaired a fractured pipe in the basement that was spraying water all about. Plumbed a water line for the ice maker when I got a new fridge.

In 37 years, I've replaced the toilet flush valve I don't know how many times. And the wax ring once.
Helped upgrade my electrical service box. An out of work friend electrician installed the box and the mains connections. I finished the job and installed all of the new breakers myself. All done to code. I also added a 240v 50a subfeed box to power my Seti crunchers years later. I am an electrician by trade. Although never certified to do work for other people, I worked with a licensed master electrician for several years as an apprentice. And now I wire fire trucks for a living.

I've maintained all of my automobiles. Everything from air cleaner and spark plug and tire changes, to water pumps, alternators, timing chains, a camshaft, v and serpentine belts, valve cover gaskets, carbeurators, fuel injectors, thermostats, an intake manifold, heater hoses, radiators, more than a few exhaust systems, and a power steering pump. Couple of ball joints, many starters, batteries, and installed a new engine in my little RX7. Once installed a lower A frame in one of my Buick Electra boats out on a residential street when the ball joint failed and left the tire sitting at a rather inopportune angle. Factory manuals are sooooooooooooooo helpful! So, I guess that makes me a motorhead as well.

Helped re-shingle the roof a number of years back, replaced door locksets a few times, my window air conditioner several times, caulked the cracks, cleaned and sealed the gutters, replaced stove burner elements and a couple of broken windows. I guess that makes me a homeowner.

I also studied many aspects of kitty husbandry, cared for one cat through her battle with CRF, another through her battle with cancer, and nursed a third through her final senior years until it was time for her to go. So I am better equipped these days to properly care for my kitties.
But I do not think that begins to make me a vet.

I could not begin to add up the money I have saved all these years by being a man who, when he is determined to do something, gets down to brass tacks and begins to learn how.

Meowtinkertinker.


Yeah I read the Readers Digest book on house repairs, I learned a decent amount, was able to wire up a few circuits, and add a ground wire to a light socket in a bathroom too, the light didn't have a ground wire before, but then I noticed new light sockets did have a screw for that, so I updated a circuit, it also taught Me what was hot, neutral, and ground, a very helpful book. Some people won't use a search engine, My sister in law is one of those, and to think She has a college degree. Still She is My sister in law.


The kitchen faucet here was installed, after I'd bought it from the Home Depot, sometime around early 2007, about 5 or 6 years later the faucet began to leak along the spout, that leak is now gone, why? Calcium Carbonate deposits sealed the rusted out leak, and the faucet works as good as it ever has.

I have replaced one outlet w/a GFCI outlet in a bathroom, and a light switch here in the kitchen, what is needed here to be repaired are in odd positions, though not all, I have had knee trouble since I was 12yrs old, when I was 11yrs I started growing in height, this stopped at age 12, then sometime later the growth started again, though more gradually.

Toilet fill valves, yeah they are simple to replace, not so if one can't get up easily, being about 410lbs is not easy, there is this thing called gravity, it's a law even Congress can't repeal.

Autos, even though I have knowledge, I've never worked on a car, at least beyond changing a flat tire for the spare tire.

When I reroofed a garage, I did that in the most simple way that I could, I used some roofing nails, and rolls of roofing paper, I started at the bottom edge and made sure the rolls overlapped all the way to the peak, with a roll going on the peak last, the roof leaks stopped, all thanks to Me, I could have done the same to the house back in 1980, in theory, but that needed more work, since the garage roof was a lot more simple, than the house, and the house was visible from the street, which was across from a school, so it was decided to call a roofer, but I got the garage done, and to this day I don't think anyone has reroofed that garage, at least from what I've seen from google maps at street level, the garage is separate from the house and at the end of a long and narrow driveway, they did put up a gate on the driveway though, something that I had wanted to do, but money was short, and it is narrow there between the house and concrete driveway, and the driveway and the wooden fence. Oh and the roof used to be White, Brown might look good, but it's bad at reflecting heat.


If I owned that house again, this time without My mom, I'd do things differently, the walls being balloon framed would get stops at the bottom below the floor to prevent any wall insulation from coming out, also I would fix the foundation, and make a new concrete back patio, and rear porch, as severe cracking had happened, before mom got the place, Her brother planted a banana tree next to the foundation, it cracked the whole thing, and I'd replace that fireplace, as it then had no damper, none at all, and the wiring is knob and tube, or at least it was then, today? Who knows, all I know is back in 1986 I sold the house for $120,000.00, then turned around and bought a condo, 2 years later I sold that with a $20,000.00 profit, right before the market for condos crashed I heard, oopsie, the condo didn't have cable tv, and the stupid treasurer wouldn't allow that in, even if the cable company replaced any plants that might be damaged, dumb ass treasurer, the only thing the treasurer wanted out of Me, was that I spoke fluent english, though she was perfectly understandable, so why did She really need Me as President of the HOA? I've no idea, but then in the 2yrs I lived there, We never had any meetings of the HOA, so go figure.
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Message 1891007 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 19:41:45 UTC

I learned by taking things apart and putting them back together.
I have rebuilt engines, whole cars and trucks. Restored model A's, T's and a Land Cruiser. As for homes I have restored a Victorian, personally designed and built 3, and lead the design, build and sale of over 2,000.
Vic, in your case I would just take the AC-A frame out and leave the existing plenum.
You also need to change your furnace filters more often. That should prevent the cat hair build up.
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Message 1891012 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 20:02:01 UTC - in response to Message 1891007.  
Last modified: 20 Sep 2017, 20:04:26 UTC

I learned by taking things apart and putting them back together.
I have rebuilt engines, whole cars and trucks. Restored model A's, T's and a Land Cruiser. As for homes I have restored a Victorian, personally designed and built 3, and lead the design, build and sale of over 2,000.
Vic, in your case I would just take the AC-A frame out and leave the existing plenum.
You also need to change your furnace filters more often. That should prevent the cat hair build up.

I don't know how to do that, and I have trouble seeing in less than bright light, plus I am not able bodied anymore, so I have to pay someone to do that.

The filters are custom sized and cut, and I looked at the other side, just as clean as this side, and these are the latest, installed about a year or two back.

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Message 1891016 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 20:35:25 UTC

I would be worried seeing filters in that very clean state after a couple of years use - the a/c filters at work are in a far worse state than that after one week.
That suggests there are other problems lurking around the corner with the air handling on your furnace or a/c (which ever those filters are from), or the system hasn't actually been used. Second thoughts - if something else was clogged with cat fur and other stuff then that might explain why air isn't being circulated properly through the filters.

As Carlos said, get rid of that useless a/c frame - you've nothing on the 'fridge side so all it is doing is collecting cat fur etc. Removing this might cure might cure a few other problems with your furnace - such as the ignition/pilot light faults you've had in the past.
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Message 1891029 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 21:32:01 UTC - in response to Message 1891016.  

I would be worried seeing filters in that very clean state after a couple of years use - the a/c filters at work are in a far worse state than that after one week.
That suggests there are other problems lurking around the corner with the air handling on your furnace or a/c (which ever those filters are from), or the system hasn't actually been used. Second thoughts - if something else was clogged with cat fur and other stuff then that might explain why air isn't being circulated properly through the filters.

As Carlos said, get rid of that useless a/c frame - you've nothing on the 'fridge side so all it is doing is collecting cat fur etc. Removing this might cure might cure a few other problems with your furnace - such as the ignition/pilot light faults you've had in the past.

I will, or rather H&B will, I'm going to be scheduled, I'm told it could take a couple of hours at $79 an hour, plus $13 for a trip charge out here, I'm not able to do the work.

On another note I did get the Valve Stems in, Black Rubber, all the way from that far off land called Santa Ana CA...

And Eddie World is getting closer to opening, it's a sign from Eddie... Pics are from My old smart phone, I use it now as a camera only.

Eddie World is still working on their "Sewer System", yeah that is what they're calling it, it's still a hole in the ground, I missed getting a pic of that.

More of the back of Eddied World in Yermo CA.

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Message 1891034 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 21:58:36 UTC

Vic,
Fleetwood is still in business. I suspect this may be your floor plan. That filter is not doing it's job. The air is being picked up somewhere else. I developed one project where I installed just over 200 Fleetwood manufactured homes. I have been at the factory many times. The filter should be a paper filter located at the base of the furnace. It should be replaced monthly but at most every 3 months.
Here are the Department of Energy recommendations.
Check your filter every month, especially during heavy use months (winter and summer). If the filter looks dirty after a month, change it. At a minimum, change the filter every 3 months.

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Message 1891037 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 22:04:58 UTC - in response to Message 1891029.  

That's a cool looking cone! I'm thinking the "sprinkles" will light up at night.
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Message 1891038 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 22:06:22 UTC - in response to Message 1891034.  

Vic,
Fleetwood is still in business. I suspect this may be your floor plan. That filter is not doing it's job. The air is being picked up somewhere else. I developed one project where I installed just over 200 Fleetwood manufactured homes. I have been at the factory many times. The filter should be a paper filter located at the base of the furnace. It should be replaced monthly but at most every 3 months.
Here are the Department of Energy recommendations.
Check your filter every month, especially during heavy use months (winter and summer). If the filter looks dirty after a month, change it. At a minimum, change the filter every 3 months.

I called Fleetwood once, they said the company that built My place, only shares the name, legally I was told they can not help Me at all.
https://www.thestar.com/business/2009/03/10/fleetwood_files_for_bankruptcy.html

That's just the back side of the Coleman gas furnace, the outside is very restrictive, but then the intake is not really designed with a normal filter in mind, nor to allow air to go to every corner.
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Message 1891039 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 22:07:59 UTC - in response to Message 1891034.  

Vic,
Fleetwood is still in business. I suspect this may be your floor plan. That filter is not doing it's job. The air is being picked up somewhere else. I developed one project where I installed just over 200 Fleetwood manufactured homes. I have been at the factory many times. The filter should be a paper filter located at the base of the furnace. It should be replaced monthly but at most every 3 months.
Here are the Department of Energy recommendations.
Check your filter every month, especially during heavy use months (winter and summer). If the filter looks dirty after a month, change it. At a minimum, change the filter every 3 months.

And no, that is an Eagle, not a Westfield... They are not the same.
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Message 1891040 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 22:12:20 UTC - in response to Message 1891037.  
Last modified: 20 Sep 2017, 22:13:58 UTC

That's a cool looking cone! I'm thinking the "sprinkles" will light up at night.

Well part of the cherry will light up, that's for sure, only the lights for the building and the pumps are on at night currently.

There is internal lighting inside the cone.

It's supposed to have a Convenience Store inside too, and the Candy?

Made on location, not off the shelf from what I've read, Calico Rd might need a 4 lane overpass over the fwy, it has a 2 lane overpass now.
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