Blue Lightning?

Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Blue Lightning?
Message board moderation

To post messages, you must log in.

AuthorMessage
Profile Bob DeWoody
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 9 May 10
Posts: 2813
Credit: 1,202,782
RAC: 567
United States
Message 1822952 - Posted: 9 Oct 2016, 12:56:20 UTC

On Friday evening as Matthew was moving out of central Florida and while I was driving home I saw what appeared to be blue lightning. The bolts themselves were a bluish white but the clouds they came out of glowed a blue to violet color. The first one I saw, I thought was my mind playing tricks on me but then I saw at least two more instances. I looked up blue lightning on google but didn't find anything that matched what I saw. This was cloud to cloud lightning and I didn't see a ground strike. Have any of you seen anything similar?
Bob DeWoody

My motto: Never do today what you can put off until tomorrow as it may not be required. This no longer applies in light of current events.
ID: 1822952 · Report as offensive
bluestar

Send message
Joined: 5 Sep 12
Posts: 2131
Credit: 1,915,015
RAC: 137
Message 1822955 - Posted: 9 Oct 2016, 13:17:13 UTC
Last modified: 9 Oct 2016, 13:40:28 UTC

Good point, Bob DeWoody.

"Itchy pitchy" could almost be said when it comes to this phenomenon.

But I think I might have seen it myself.

In my opinion, I could be viewing such a thing as "Indirect lightning", meaning that the lightning itself by means of the flash or bolt could be either obscured by clouds and therefore not directly seen or visible.

Possibly it could be below or beyond the horizon, meaning out at sea, but this could next be happening in the night.

Therefore it is the light itself which is propagating and whether or not this is because of the atmosphere, I really do not know.

However, I suspect it could be so.

Edit: Using the national edition of the Wikipedia, the local word for this suddenly comes up.

I do not have the translation, but any thunder being associated with the lightning might not be heard.

Therefore it is a thing which is happening at quite a distance.

Edit: Found the following information.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightning

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_lightning

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ball_lightning

The second and third link from "Observational variations" some halfway down in the first link.

The word being used for this is from the Wikipedia and became something else and it is not "Ball lightning" either, which is something else.

The latter has not been personally experienced, but I happen to recall an event from my child years, where something apparently hit the roof of a house, creating a very strange sound.

This was not something of the ordinary.
ID: 1822955 · Report as offensive
rob smith
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 7 Mar 03
Posts: 14927
Credit: 231,558,122
RAC: 391,547
United Kingdom
Message 1822994 - Posted: 9 Oct 2016, 17:06:16 UTC

Lightening has a very high colour temperature, which will tend to look blue. Also the human eye tends to shift colours so that the predominant colour of light appears white. Thus, as you were driving at night I assume you had your car headlights on, these typically have a very warm (orange/red) colour, and your eyes will gradually drift this to look white, so the very "hot" lightening flash will appear even more blue than one would expect.
Bob Smith
Member of Seti PIPPS (Pluto is a Planet Protest Society)
Somewhere in the (un)known Universe?
ID: 1822994 · Report as offensive
Profile LynnProject Donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 20 Nov 00
Posts: 11688
Credit: 29,960,675
RAC: 39,185
United States
Message 1823090 - Posted: 9 Oct 2016, 23:37:12 UTC - in response to Message 1822994.  

Bob, did you see this?


See the rare sprites over Hurricane Matthew.

https://youtu.be/F3rfOPG9LNI
ET Phone Home
ID: 1823090 · Report as offensive

Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Blue Lightning?


 
©2017 University of California
 
SETI@home and Astropulse are funded by grants from the National Science Foundation, NASA, and donations from SETI@home volunteers. AstroPulse is funded in part by the NSF through grant AST-0307956.