Another example of USA Gun Laws (or lack of...)?

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Message 1770777 - Posted: 10 Mar 2016, 17:45:10 UTC - in response to Message 1770669.  

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Message 1771499 - Posted: 14 Mar 2016, 4:47:09 UTC

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Message 1771556 - Posted: 14 Mar 2016, 13:04:14 UTC - in response to Message 1771499.  

Follow on from the Jamie Gilt story. The macabre truth of gun control in the US is that toddlers kill more people than terrorists do

Indeed, it is high time we started a war on children for the threat they pose. Children hate the West and our freedoms.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that ...

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Message 1771563 - Posted: 14 Mar 2016, 13:56:38 UTC - in response to Message 1771499.  

The macabre truth of gun control in the US is that toddlers kill more people than terrorists do
And people get upset when they strip search toddlers at the airport security checkpoint!
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Message 1771667 - Posted: 15 Mar 2016, 2:20:12 UTC

I asked it before. I'll ask again, in a somewhat naive phrasing this time: why do people LOVE what is supposed to be a TOOL for self-defense?
Capitalize on this good fortune, one word can bring you round ... changes.
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Message 1771690 - Posted: 15 Mar 2016, 5:40:25 UTC - in response to Message 1771667.  

I asked it before. I'll ask again, in a somewhat naive phrasing this time: why do people LOVE what is supposed to be a TOOL for self-defense?

It gives people who don't think it through a sense of security, usually wrongly.

You only need to look at the number of firearm accidents, suicides and the number of times they get into the wrong hands, other family members or criminals who steal them.
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Message 1771721 - Posted: 15 Mar 2016, 10:31:38 UTC - in response to Message 1771690.  

I asked it before. I'll ask again, in a somewhat naive phrasing this time: why do people LOVE what is supposed to be a TOOL for self-defense?

It gives people who don't think it through a sense of security, usually wrongly.

You only need to look at the number of firearm accidents, suicides and the number of times they get into the wrong hands, other family members or criminals who steal them.


I'm not sure that answers it.
For example (apologies to vegetarians), "I loooove a good steak!"
3 locks on my doors also provides a sense of security, but do people say "I looove locks. I get 'jacked up' locking my soors!"?
Capitalize on this good fortune, one word can bring you round ... changes.
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Message 1771733 - Posted: 15 Mar 2016, 13:11:15 UTC - in response to Message 1771721.  

I asked it before. I'll ask again, in a somewhat naive phrasing this time: why do people LOVE what is supposed to be a TOOL for self-defense?

It gives people who don't think it through a sense of security, usually wrongly.

You only need to look at the number of firearm accidents, suicides and the number of times they get into the wrong hands, other family members or criminals who steal them.


I'm not sure that answers it.
For example (apologies to vegetarians), "I loooove a good steak!"
3 locks on my doors also provides a sense of security, but do people say "I looove locks. I get 'jacked up' locking my soors!"?

People do have preferences in the weapons they use, how it fits their hands, and into the shoulder for rifles, where the safety catch and magazine release are, and most importantly the balance. Sights can usually be changed.

I didn't like the UK Armies SLR (modified FN) when I served, and would prefer to be on the Bren or GPMG.
But by far preferred my Anshutz rifle I used for Biathlon. But I wouldn't say I loved it, it was a tool that suited me best.

It's probably to do with the language used by so many people in the media these days, they love this and are so excited about that.
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Message 1771751 - Posted: 15 Mar 2016, 21:43:46 UTC - in response to Message 1771733.  

I asked it before. I'll ask again, in a somewhat naive phrasing this time: why do people LOVE what is supposed to be a TOOL for self-defense?

It gives people who don't think it through a sense of security, usually wrongly.

You only need to look at the number of firearm accidents, suicides and the number of times they get into the wrong hands, other family members or criminals who steal them.


I'm not sure that answers it.
For example (apologies to vegetarians), "I loooove a good steak!"
3 locks on my doors also provides a sense of security, but do people say "I looove locks. I get 'jacked up' locking my soors!"?

People do have preferences in the weapons they use, how it fits their hands, and into the shoulder for rifles, where the safety catch and magazine release are, and most importantly the balance. Sights can usually be changed.

I didn't like the UK Armies SLR (modified FN) when I served, and would prefer to be on the Bren or GPMG.
But by far preferred my Anshutz rifle I used for Biathlon. But I wouldn't say I loved it, it was a tool that suited me best.

It's probably to do with the language used by so many people in the media these days, they love this and are so excited about that.


But, as a tool, why do you not then here people say "I am so excited about this new [insert name brand] hammer I got for Christmas. Dang, I can't wait to go swing that against some nails, knock them nails into wood. Shoot, all that swinging and pounding gets me ALL jacked up! Yee haw!!!"? (Or, do you hear people speak that way? Can't say I recall anyone doing so.)
Capitalize on this good fortune, one word can bring you round ... changes.
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Message 1771755 - Posted: 15 Mar 2016, 22:00:35 UTC - in response to Message 1771751.  

I asked it before. I'll ask again, in a somewhat naive phrasing this time: why do people LOVE what is supposed to be a TOOL for self-defense?

It gives people who don't think it through a sense of security, usually wrongly.

You only need to look at the number of firearm accidents, suicides and the number of times they get into the wrong hands, other family members or criminals who steal them.


I'm not sure that answers it.
For example (apologies to vegetarians), "I loooove a good steak!"
3 locks on my doors also provides a sense of security, but do people say "I looove locks. I get 'jacked up' locking my soors!"?

People do have preferences in the weapons they use, how it fits their hands, and into the shoulder for rifles, where the safety catch and magazine release are, and most importantly the balance. Sights can usually be changed.

I didn't like the UK Armies SLR (modified FN) when I served, and would prefer to be on the Bren or GPMG.
But by far preferred my Anshutz rifle I used for Biathlon. But I wouldn't say I loved it, it was a tool that suited me best.

It's probably to do with the language used by so many people in the media these days, they love this and are so excited about that.


But, as a tool, why do you not then here people say "I am so excited about this new [insert name brand] hammer I got for Christmas. Dang, I can't wait to go swing that against some nails, knock them nails into wood. Shoot, all that swinging and pounding gets me ALL jacked up! Yee haw!!!"? (Or, do you hear people speak that way? Can't say I recall anyone doing so.)


Hammers... maybe not...

But a good table-saw... now THAT can get the excitement level WAY up... :P

Plus, you forgot the other 'big tool'... The Automobile, especially the Sports Car... A LOT of people are positively Bug-Nutz over the things...
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Message 1771816 - Posted: 16 Mar 2016, 4:11:37 UTC - in response to Message 1771755.  

I asked it before. I'll ask again, in a somewhat naive phrasing this time: why do people LOVE what is supposed to be a TOOL for self-defense?

It gives people who don't think it through a sense of security, usually wrongly.

You only need to look at the number of firearm accidents, suicides and the number of times they get into the wrong hands, other family members or criminals who steal them.


I'm not sure that answers it.
For example (apologies to vegetarians), "I loooove a good steak!"
3 locks on my doors also provides a sense of security, but do people say "I looove locks. I get 'jacked up' locking my soors!"?

People do have preferences in the weapons they use, how it fits their hands, and into the shoulder for rifles, where the safety catch and magazine release are, and most importantly the balance. Sights can usually be changed.

I didn't like the UK Armies SLR (modified FN) when I served, and would prefer to be on the Bren or GPMG.
But by far preferred my Anshutz rifle I used for Biathlon. But I wouldn't say I loved it, it was a tool that suited me best.

It's probably to do with the language used by so many people in the media these days, they love this and are so excited about that.


But, as a tool, why do you not then here people say "I am so excited about this new [insert name brand] hammer I got for Christmas. Dang, I can't wait to go swing that against some nails, knock them nails into wood. Shoot, all that swinging and pounding gets me ALL jacked up! Yee haw!!!"? (Or, do you hear people speak that way? Can't say I recall anyone doing so.)


Hammers... maybe not...

But a good table-saw... now THAT can get the excitement level WAY up... :P

Plus, you forgot the other 'big tool'... The Automobile, especially the Sports Car... A LOT of people are positively Bug-Nutz over the things...

We have things in common there, I too feel happiest working out how to use woodworking tools to their best.

And cars, most people don't understand how I feel these days about the wrong decision I made to sell, what was probably the best car I have owned, rather than put it in storage. When the Army sent me to a place where a bicycle was the only fast form of transport, for an individual.
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Message 1771823 - Posted: 16 Mar 2016, 4:35:46 UTC - in response to Message 1771755.  

I asked it before. I'll ask again, in a somewhat naive phrasing this time: why do people LOVE what is supposed to be a TOOL for self-defense?

It gives people who don't think it through a sense of security, usually wrongly.

You only need to look at the number of firearm accidents, suicides and the number of times they get into the wrong hands, other family members or criminals who steal them.


I'm not sure that answers it.
For example (apologies to vegetarians), "I loooove a good steak!"
3 locks on my doors also provides a sense of security, but do people say "I looove locks. I get 'jacked up' locking my soors!"?

People do have preferences in the weapons they use, how it fits their hands, and into the shoulder for rifles, where the safety catch and magazine release are, and most importantly the balance. Sights can usually be changed.

I didn't like the UK Armies SLR (modified FN) when I served, and would prefer to be on the Bren or GPMG.
But by far preferred my Anshutz rifle I used for Biathlon. But I wouldn't say I loved it, it was a tool that suited me best.

It's probably to do with the language used by so many people in the media these days, they love this and are so excited about that.


But, as a tool, why do you not then here people say "I am so excited about this new [insert name brand] hammer I got for Christmas. Dang, I can't wait to go swing that against some nails, knock them nails into wood. Shoot, all that swinging and pounding gets me ALL jacked up! Yee haw!!!"? (Or, do you hear people speak that way? Can't say I recall anyone doing so.)


Hammers... maybe not...

But a good table-saw... now THAT can get the excitement level WAY up... :P

Plus, you forgot the other 'big tool'... The Automobile, especially the Sports Car... A LOT of people are positively Bug-Nutz over the things...

Wondering how archers feel about their bows .... (see some run $700!)
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Message 1771906 - Posted: 16 Mar 2016, 15:29:04 UTC - in response to Message 1771892.  

I asked it before. I'll ask again, in a somewhat naive phrasing this time: why do people LOVE what is supposed to be a TOOL for self-defense?

Sarge...

Just a particular Culture.

Try to explain the the 'Why' of any Culture.

Good luck.

Too many fanciful John Wayne spaghetti westerns repeatedly shown on the TV?...


Sheesh... For a few words born out of civil war for the second amendment, are you lot still at war with each other?...


All on our only one world,
Martin
See new freedom: Mageia Linux
Take a look for yourself: Linux Format
The Future is what We all make IT (GPLv3)
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Message 1771913 - Posted: 16 Mar 2016, 15:49:26 UTC - in response to Message 1771906.  

I asked it before. I'll ask again, in a somewhat naive phrasing this time: why do people LOVE what is supposed to be a TOOL for self-defense?

Sarge...

Just a particular Culture.

Try to explain the the 'Why' of any Culture.

Good luck.

Too many fanciful John Wayne spaghetti westerns repeatedly shown on the TV?...

Right idea, wrong show. It is this guy behind a lectern, er alter, thumping a book in his hand screaming that the Apocalypse is coming and to be ready, oh and please send me money.
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Message 1771937 - Posted: 16 Mar 2016, 18:00:50 UTC - in response to Message 1771917.  

Shouldn't it be called the "Department of War"?
It used to be called the United States Department of War
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Message 1771958 - Posted: 16 Mar 2016, 19:30:01 UTC - in response to Message 1771906.  


Too many fanciful John Wayne spaghetti westerns repeatedly shown on the TV?...



Martin,

Your statement here does not make much sense.

The 'spaghetti westerns'...

1. They are not shown much on TV any more here in the USA, except on specialized cable 'premium' channels.

2. They are, with VERY few exceptions, NOT USA-made movies. They were primarily made in Europe, mostly Italy and Spain, although a very few were made in India and Japan.

3. They were made between 1959 and 1979, with only a handful made since.

4. The level of violence in these 'Euro-Westerns' far exceeded the level of violence in the more traditional USA-made westerns.

5. John Wayne did NOT star in any of these 'spaghetti westerns', to the best of my knowledge. Most of the actors in them were more... local... to the location where they were made, although a few actors were (or became) somewhat famous actors in the USA. Rising stars such as Clint Eastwood (the anti-hero 'Man with No Name' in the 'Dollars' trilogy by Sergio Leone -- 1964, 1965, and 1966 -- the most iconic of these movies here in the USA). Also fading stars such as Lee Van Cleef, again in the same three movies... or Chuck Conners in 'Kill them all and come back alone' (Enzo G. Castellari, 1968)).

As far as John Wayne goes, yes he did star in quite a few USA-made westerns, but my favorites among the movies he starred in include such flims as 'The Quiet Man (1952 -- Set in Ireland), and "Donovan's Reef" (1963 -- Set on a Pacific Island). I also like his war movies. His westerns -- they are all right, I suppose, but not near the top of my favorites of his.

6. USA made Westerns are a gross exaggeration of reality. Think about it.

"Hey Walter!"
"Yes, Ernie?"
"Them cows done went and run off again!"
"Ok... Saddle the horses, lets go find 'em."

or

"Hey Bert!"
"Yes, Lucinda?"
"The crop out in the field is beginning to look like it could use some water. You reckon it might rain soon?"

In other words, boring.

Boring does not sell movie tickets. So, the movie producers fell back on some legends created to form a demand for a form of entertainment from the 2nd half of the 19th Century... A form of circus known as a 'Wild West Show'...

So, by basing your ideas on culture in the American West of the 19th century on spaghetti westerns... you are basing them on a gross exaggeration of a gross exaggeration of what actually went on.

Or, as I frequently tell my wife and kids...

"That is a movie... It is total fiction. It AIN'T REAL!"
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Message 1771992 - Posted: 16 Mar 2016, 21:03:57 UTC - in response to Message 1771958.  

"That is a movie... It is total fiction. It AIN'T REAL!"

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0390521/
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0486358/

;-)
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Message 1773823 - Posted: 25 Mar 2016, 1:59:26 UTC

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Message 1773865 - Posted: 25 Mar 2016, 5:56:58 UTC - in response to Message 1773834.  

NRA launches fairy-tale campaign to convey its message that more guns will make the world safer

Doesn't matter, and has never mattered, what the NRA or any anti-gun organization says.

100,000,000 Americans, having guns in their households, have already made up their minds.

Don't be silly.
The sooner something is absorbed by the brain, the more it forms a fundamental part of that person thinking throughout their lives. It requires either a big "kick" or intelligent thinking to get a change after that, usually when outside the umbrella of their family home and influence.

Children learn multiple languages much easier at a young age. By the time schools usually start teaching other languages the children have started to become self-conscious and afraid they will make a mistake an look foolish.

Young people who leave home very religious usually come from a family with a domineering religious father. And unless they go to another religious community, tend to have a hard time, or start to question, and it some cases, reject their religious background.
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Message 1778349 - Posted: 12 Apr 2016, 15:30:19 UTC
Last modified: 12 Apr 2016, 15:31:42 UTC

Greetings,

This data may be somewhat outdated, but I believe it proves a point.

This post is directed mainly at Martin.

Go to this website and get your facts straight. Pay very close attention about 1/3 down the page about the MYTH of lower crime rate in the U.K. by strict gun laws. There is a real nice fact about the U.K. vs the U.S. I would be careful what you say about my country.

"When guns are outlawed, only outlaws will have guns."
"They can have my guns when they can pry them from my cold dead fingers."

Enjoy the read Martin and have a great day! :)

Keep on BOINCing...! :)
CAPT Siran d'Vel'nahr XO - L L & P _\\//
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Message boards : Politics : Another example of USA Gun Laws (or lack of...)?


 
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