Car transmissions - Standard or automatic?

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Message 1556230 - Posted: 13 Aug 2014, 16:50:57 UTC - in response to Message 1556206.  

It does appear from information received via PM that residents in the USA drive automatics differently to us in the UK and Europe. Apparently I wouldn't pass a USA driving test, and neither would they pass a UK one!

vive la différence as they say :-)))

What's the difference??? You take it out of Park and into Reverse to back out of your parking space, you move it to Drive to go forward, you put it back in Park when you get there. If you don't want to hold the brake while stopped for a long red light or at a fast food drive-thru, you put it in neutral (but make sure you don't roll).

I've always put My foot on the brake pedal at a stop sign or a stop light, at fast food when I did go there, park was preferred.
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Message 1556244 - Posted: 13 Aug 2014, 17:15:07 UTC - in response to Message 1556230.  

It does appear from information received via PM that residents in the USA drive automatics differently to us in the UK and Europe. Apparently I wouldn't pass a USA driving test, and neither would they pass a UK one!

vive la différence as they say :-)))

What's the difference??? You take it out of Park and into Reverse to back out of your parking space, you move it to Drive to go forward, you put it back in Park when you get there. If you don't want to hold the brake while stopped for a long red light or at a fast food drive-thru, you put it in neutral (but make sure you don't roll).

I've always put My foot on the brake pedal at a stop sign or a stop light, at fast food when I did go there, park was preferred.

Putting it in Park is safer. You can be on a slight incline, and maybe there is a small bump or pebble holding the car. The tires flex a little bit, and you are rolling......
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Message 1556258 - Posted: 13 Aug 2014, 17:29:13 UTC - in response to Message 1556244.  

Putting it in Park is safer. You can be on a slight incline, and maybe there is a small bump or pebble holding the car. The tires flex a little bit, and you are rolling......

When parked, I've never trusted park or the handbrake so if on an upward slope left it in 1st & if a downward, left it in reverse.
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Message 1556261 - Posted: 13 Aug 2014, 17:33:09 UTC - in response to Message 1556258.  

Putting it in Park is safer. You can be on a slight incline, and maybe there is a small bump or pebble holding the car. The tires flex a little bit, and you are rolling......

When parked, I've never trusted park or the handbrake so if on an upward slope left it in 1st & if a downward, left it in reverse.

But you are talking about a manual. We were talking about an automatic. Leaving an automatic in gear does not work, as once the engine stops, there is no hydraulic pressure to engage the gears and it is essentially in neutral.
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Message 1556326 - Posted: 13 Aug 2014, 18:45:38 UTC - in response to Message 1556261.  

True, which is one of the reasons why I disliked automatics.
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Message 1556421 - Posted: 13 Aug 2014, 23:07:13 UTC - in response to Message 1556230.  

It does appear from information received via PM that residents in the USA drive automatics differently to us in the UK and Europe. Apparently I wouldn't pass a USA driving test, and neither would they pass a UK one!

vive la différence as they say :-)))

What's the difference??? You take it out of Park and into Reverse to back out of your parking space, you move it to Drive to go forward, you put it back in Park when you get there. If you don't want to hold the brake while stopped for a long red light or at a fast food drive-thru, you put it in neutral (but make sure you don't roll).

I've always put My foot on the brake pedal at a stop sign or a stop light, at fast food when I did go there, park was preferred.

Yes. After all if your foot isn't on the brake pedal, the idiot behind you slams into you at full speed because your brake lights aren't on.
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Message 1556436 - Posted: 13 Aug 2014, 23:25:39 UTC - in response to Message 1556421.  

It does appear from information received via PM that residents in the USA drive automatics differently to us in the UK and Europe. Apparently I wouldn't pass a USA driving test, and neither would they pass a UK one!

vive la différence as they say :-)))

What's the difference??? You take it out of Park and into Reverse to back out of your parking space, you move it to Drive to go forward, you put it back in Park when you get there. If you don't want to hold the brake while stopped for a long red light or at a fast food drive-thru, you put it in neutral (but make sure you don't roll).

I've always put My foot on the brake pedal at a stop sign or a stop light, at fast food when I did go there, park was preferred.

Yes. After all if your foot isn't on the brake pedal, the idiot behind you slams into you at full speed because your brake lights aren't on.

I consider that and wait until he stops before I take my foot off.
David
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Message 1556514 - Posted: 14 Aug 2014, 2:46:33 UTC
Last modified: 14 Aug 2014, 2:48:26 UTC

I use three ways of securing the car -- even if not parked on a hill:

1) Put (standard) transmission into reverse gear.

2) Engage emergency brake (some question about this, in very cold weather).

3) "Curb" the front wheels (if curb available).
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Message 1556519 - Posted: 14 Aug 2014, 3:05:45 UTC - in response to Message 1556514.  

Engage emergency brake in very cold weather


My car is now over nine years old and the emergency brake
still works like a charm in all weathers.
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Message 1556521 - Posted: 14 Aug 2014, 3:08:44 UTC - in response to Message 1556514.  

I use three ways of securing the car -- even if not parked on a hill:

3) "Curb" the front wheels (if curb available).


I've always had trouble remembering which way to turn the wheels on a hill.
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Message 1556523 - Posted: 14 Aug 2014, 3:21:54 UTC - in response to Message 1556519.  

Engage emergency brake in very cold weather


My car is now over nine years old and the emergency brake
still works like a charm in all weathers.

Mines 15yr, but being the ground here is largely flat, the hand brake rarely gets used.
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Message 1556524 - Posted: 14 Aug 2014, 3:22:19 UTC - in response to Message 1556521.  

I use three ways of securing the car -- even if not parked on a hill:

3) "Curb" the front wheels (if curb available).


I've always had trouble remembering which way to turn the wheels on a hill.

So if it rolls it rolls out of the street, not into the street.
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Message 1556526 - Posted: 14 Aug 2014, 3:25:01 UTC - in response to Message 1556524.  

I use three ways of securing the car -- even if not parked on a hill:

3) "Curb" the front wheels (if curb available).


I've always had trouble remembering which way to turn the wheels on a hill.

So if it rolls it rolls out of the street, not into the street.


I know that's the idea, but it's not intuitive to me which way turning the tires accomplishes that.
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Message 1556542 - Posted: 14 Aug 2014, 4:25:30 UTC - in response to Message 1556526.  

I use three ways of securing the car -- even if not parked on a hill:

3) "Curb" the front wheels (if curb available).


I've always had trouble remembering which way to turn the wheels on a hill.

So if it rolls it rolls out of the street, not into the street.


I know that's the idea, but it's not intuitive to me which way turning the tires accomplishes that.

just pretend you want to turn onto the side walk.
[/quote]

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Message 1556544 - Posted: 14 Aug 2014, 4:28:49 UTC - in response to Message 1556542.  

I use three ways of securing the car -- even if not parked on a hill:

3) "Curb" the front wheels (if curb available).


I've always had trouble remembering which way to turn the wheels on a hill.

So if it rolls it rolls out of the street, not into the street.


I know that's the idea, but it's not intuitive to me which way turning the tires accomplishes that.

just pretend you want to turn onto the side walk.


Ok, I can wrap my head around that. :~) Thanks, James.
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Message 1556576 - Posted: 14 Aug 2014, 5:33:06 UTC - in response to Message 1556545.  

Whoops. double post.

Suppose to double clutch not double post.
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Message 1556611 - Posted: 14 Aug 2014, 6:25:16 UTC - in response to Message 1556545.  

Whoops. double post.

I thought that rule only applied in the TLPTPW threads....

I was taught when parking on a hill, if aimed uphill, turn the front wheels away from the curb, and if parked downhill, turn towards the curb, so if the brakes fail, gravity will put the tires against the curb and you won't roll far.
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Message 1556722 - Posted: 14 Aug 2014, 14:20:42 UTC

Celt, parking brakes work fine in Alberta winters, but sometimes give problems in Ontario winters. We have a lot more wet snow here, and this can turn into ice overnight on the exposed portions of the brake mechanism. This prevents it from fully releasing the next morning, even though handles go to the "off" position and lights turn off. Most drivers just drive on, with a partially set brake. They don't realize this is happening, until the next time they take the car in for brake servicing.

Must say this has only happened to me on older frame style cars. The new unibodies seem to have all the moving brake bits inside, out of the snow.

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Message 1556727 - Posted: 14 Aug 2014, 14:40:33 UTC

All this talk about foot brakes vs. hand brakes, reminds me of the bright light controls operated by the foot on a Chevy Malibu my parents had in the 70's. I thought that was pretty neat. :~)
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Message 1556744 - Posted: 14 Aug 2014, 15:46:35 UTC - in response to Message 1556722.  

Point!

The last car I drove in Ontario had the "E" brake
freeze up (Cable rust) in three years.
The car was a Ford so I just thought.......
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Message boards : Cafe SETI : Car transmissions - Standard or automatic?


 
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