Religious Thread [4] - CLOSED

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Message 58889 - Posted: 1 Jan 2005, 3:43:07 UTC - in response to Message 58870.  

Relief will not magically fall out of the sky, and I'd rather send goods for immediate use instead of money (Especialy with the ARC). But indeed, let's try to make this year the year in which we put the unfortunate ahead of ourselves.
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Message 58917 - Posted: 1 Jan 2005, 5:12:55 UTC - in response to Message 58911.  
Last modified: 2 Jan 2005, 6:43:56 UTC

> > THE JESUS CHRIST ACTION FIGURE PLAYSET
>
> Absolutely SICK!

You just couldn't resist, eh WW?

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Message 59202 - Posted: 2 Jan 2005, 3:52:05 UTC
Last modified: 2 Jan 2005, 6:49:09 UTC

^ MOVED UP ^
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Message 59209 - Posted: 2 Jan 2005, 4:09:00 UTC - in response to Message 59202.  
Last modified: 2 Jan 2005, 5:59:50 UTC

>


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Message 59221 - Posted: 2 Jan 2005, 5:03:43 UTC - in response to Message 59209.  

Invite sent!
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Message 59232 - Posted: 2 Jan 2005, 6:24:56 UTC
Last modified: 2 Jan 2005, 6:32:01 UTC

One big ataboy for you Misfit. You got WW to step on his dick while he was peeping through the keyhole. Either that, if you shake the tree hard enough, the monkey's going to eventually fall out.

+ + +
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Message 59233 - Posted: 2 Jan 2005, 6:25:15 UTC - in response to Message 59221.  

> Invite sent!

OK, I'm on. I'll take a few days to learn the ins and outs.
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Message 59234 - Posted: 2 Jan 2005, 6:34:21 UTC - in response to Message 58858.  

> Ha ha ha ha THUNK! ha ha ha ha ha [gasp fo
> air] ha ha ha ha ha ...
>
> [getting back up into chair] Wooooo! (he he he) OH!, oh, man-o-man... (giggle)
> oh, that's rich! Ha haha THUNK! ha ha ha
> ha ha...
>
[b] ROFLMFAO - teehee did the same...
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Message 61057 - Posted: 5 Jan 2005, 23:43:15 UTC

Is it safe to reopen this thread?

I come from a family of Christian ministers (though many of you know that I am not, strictly speaking, a Christian). The kind of things we have seen in this thread and others is not typical of Christianity, nor I suspect, of any mainstream religion.

I know religions have been used by many to exploit the power of religion to control people, but I don't believe that humanity would have allowed such an institution to continue unless there was some benefit in addition to that down side. So I ask again, seriously, what is the reason for religion?

I'm sure some will answer glibly that it is the opiate of the people or some such quip, but again I ask: does religion lend some benefit to people? If so, can that benefit be gained through other institutions?
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Message 61072 - Posted: 6 Jan 2005, 0:16:45 UTC

"Spiritual Thread" would have been a better topic subject.. But let's not mince words. Without getting into history, religion per se is not about abuse. Anybody has the right to discuss religious topics within the bounds of social norms. Conversely, anyone has the same right to open a Satanic thread.
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Message 61076 - Posted: 6 Jan 2005, 0:33:05 UTC - in response to Message 61057.  
Last modified: 6 Jan 2005, 1:25:21 UTC

Hey Tom...

I've have heard it posited that religion, spirituality, and belief in God are some of the surest signs of evolution...

Religious and spiritual beliefs, more often than not, promote family and community, and therefore increase the chance for survival of members/families in the community.

We may well be genetically 'hardwired' for spirituality or religion...



Regards

chip

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Message 61077 - Posted: 6 Jan 2005, 0:33:24 UTC

Why not let people differ about their answers to the great mysteries of the Universe? Let each seek one's own way to the highest, to one's own sense of supreme loyalty in life, one's ideal of life. Let each philosophy, each world-view bring forth its truth and beauty to a larger perspective, that people may grow in vision, stature and dedication.

The religions of humanity should be a unifying force, for all the great religions reveal a basic unity in ethics. Whether it be Judaism, Catholicism, Protestantism, Buddhism or Confucianism, all grow out of a sense of the sacredness of human life. This moral sensitivity to the sacredness of human personality -- the Commandments not to kill, not to hurt, not to put a stumbling block in the path of the blind, not to neglect the widow or the fatherless, not to exploit the servant or the worker -- all this can be found in the Bibles of humanity, in all the sacred books. All teach in substance: "Do unto others as you would that others should do unto you." There is, then, a basic unity among the great religions in the matter of ethics. True, there are religious philosophies which turn people away from the world, from the here and now, concentrating life-purposes on salvation for one's self or a mystic union with some supernatural reality. But most of the great religions agree on mercy, justice, love -- here on earth. And they agree that the great task is to move people from apathy, from an acceptance of the evils in life, to face the possibilities of the world, to make life sweet for one another instead of bitter. This is the unifying ethical task of all the religions -- yes, of all the philosophies of humankind. There is no need to force our own theological points of view upon one another or to insist that the moral life grows out of final, absolute authority.
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Message 61078 - Posted: 6 Jan 2005, 0:35:28 UTC - in response to Message 61076.  

> We may well be genetically 'hardwired' for spirituality or religion...

I just recently read this and it is a fascinating idea.
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Message 61080 - Posted: 6 Jan 2005, 0:42:57 UTC - in response to Message 61077.  

> Why not let people differ about their answers to the great mysteries of the
> Universe? Let each seek one's own way to the highest, to one's own sense of
> supreme loyalty in life, one's ideal of life. Let each philosophy, each
> world-view bring forth its truth and beauty to a larger perspective, that
> people may grow in vision, stature and dedication.

I would have it no other way.

> The religions of humanity should be a unifying force, for all the great
> religions reveal a basic unity in ethics. Whether it be Judaism, Catholicism,
> Protestantism, Buddhism or Confucianism, all grow out of a sense of the
> sacredness of human life. This moral sensitivity to the sacredness of human
> personality -- the Commandments not to kill, not to hurt, not to put a
> stumbling block in the path of the blind, not to neglect the widow or the
> fatherless, not to exploit the servant or the worker -- all this can be found
> in the Bibles of humanity, in all the sacred books. All teach in substance:
> "Do unto others as you would that others should do unto you." There is, then,
> a basic unity among the great religions in the matter of ethics.

Then, is this an answer to my question? Are the moral teachings of religion the reason religion exists (I am speaking collectively about all religions)?

True, there
> are religious philosophies which turn people away from the world, from the
> here and now, concentrating life-purposes on salvation for one's self or a
> mystic union with some supernatural reality.

Is this the reason?

But most of the great religions
> agree on mercy, justice, love -- here on earth. And they agree that the great
> task is to move people from apathy, from an acceptance of the evils in life,
> to face the possibilities of the world, to make life sweet for one another
> instead of bitter. This is the unifying ethical task of all the religions --
> yes, of all the philosophies of humankind.

Perhaps not all philosophies, but otherwise, I agree.

There is no need to force our own
> theological points of view upon one another or to insist that the moral life
> grows out of final, absolute authority.

Agreed, and that point is lost on many who adhere to radical religious beliefs.
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Message 61085 - Posted: 6 Jan 2005, 1:02:43 UTC

Hi Tom,
when my 15yr old Son was given homework from school
He had to find out about a chap called Algernon Black
my previous post was a "Quote" that was said by This person
I have just found this part below:-


In its deeper meaning, we say that the Ethical Movement grows out of people's refusal to accept the evils in their own lives and in the world about them. The "ethical movement" began long before there were Ethical Societies, long before there were temples and mosques and churches. It began with the dawn of conscience, with man's awareness of the suffering of others, the hurts that men do to one another. It grew as men began to recognize good and evil, to see that there are ways of hate and destruction, of love and creativeness. Through the centuries the effort of the individual to control his destructive impulses, to atone for his wrongs, to live out love and justice in his personal relations and in the larger community is the history of man's moral development. It includes, too, the social struggle to free men from slavery and exploitation, from ignorance and poverty, the movement for the emancipation of women, for civil liberties, for equality, for universal suffrage, for democracy in all areas of human relations. It is these expressions of the human spirit which are a key to a meaningful existence. It is the destiny of man to seek for truth, to create beauty, and to strive for the achievement of relationships which treasure the good in people. Man's moral growth in the personal relations and in the creation of a more ethical society, constitutes the significant spiritual movement in the life of the human race. We need not derive our ethical faith from a theology; we need only agree that all men have the possibility of moral sensitivity and moral growth.

Algernon D. Black (1900-1995) was a member of the Board of Leaders of the New York Society for Ethical Culture, and Head of the Ethics Department in the Ethical Culture Schools. He gave distinguished service to many enterprises of social welfare and reform, including especially the problems of discrimination and inter-racial relations, and was one of the founders and Educational Director of the Encampment for Citizenship. He became Senior Leader of the New York Society in 1965, and concluded some seventy years of active service to Ethical Culture and social activism as Leader Emeritus.
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Message 61089 - Posted: 6 Jan 2005, 1:26:46 UTC

My two best "Quotes" regarding Relgion

"When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad. That's my religion".
Abe Lincoln

"I have an everyday religion that works for me. Love yourself first, and everything else falls into line".
Lucille ball.....
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Message 61090 - Posted: 6 Jan 2005, 1:27:16 UTC - in response to Message 61085.  

We need not derive our ethical faith from a theology; we need only
> agree that all men have the possibility of moral sensitivity and moral
> growth.

I'm not sure that this is true. For me, the test of ethics is acting ethically, in conformance with agreed upon pro-social behaviors. In my experience, there are three kinds of people: 1) those who will do right whether or not laws (civil or religious) demand it of them, 2) those who will do right only because of a fear of the laws, and 3) those who will not do right and do not fear the laws (though they may fear being caught and punished). Even more confusing, many people fall in different categories depending on the situation, that is one might be in category "1" for murder, category "2" for shoplifting, and category "3" for traffic offenses.
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Message 61091 - Posted: 6 Jan 2005, 1:35:52 UTC - in response to Message 61057.  

Hi there,


Buddhism from my point of view. I learning.

The meditation I have heard is ment to make people have calm
and stable mind. And cope with tough siturations, often with humor.
It also is ment to bring a short lowering of blood presure. (I'm going
to test this by recording my BP for 40 days)It can make people calm
and stable becuase wile meditating you can go through why you did
things wrong.

For instance....
I was rude at work today.
Why was I being rude ?
Because I thought is was more important than the other person.
Why ?
I let emotions get in the way of clear thought.
Are you more important ?
No, all people, plants and animals are equal.
So what will you do to fix this ?
I will count to ten when someone has realy said something to upset me. This
way I can think befor getting mad.

This allows people to break down there own matters when something gets clogged
in the mind. Meditation is not just a buddhist thing. IMHO it can be carried out
by anyone and it will not break thier faith as its a form of reflection like
sitting on your own to think things through.

Buddist belief in Karma.
"If I were to hit someone I will get hit back."
"If I were to swear at someone I will be sweard at"
"If I am kind to people I will be treated kindly"
"If the sum of my life is bad, I will be reborn in worse situration
If the sum of my life is good, I will be reborn in better situration"

Every little action has a reation

IMHO Buddhism is my personal favorit as it has alot of philosophy.
Science has its place to. As do all other Religions. I suppose science
and religions try to have an answer to questions and thats why people
may be intrested in one or the other or both. People having differant
beliefs is great becuase there is always someting to learn.

Religions are good at putting peoples fear of dieing or the
uncertancy at rest.
<pre>Death is the one thing we all face</pre>
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Message 61126 - Posted: 6 Jan 2005, 3:03:07 UTC - in response to Message 61090.  

> Even more confusing, many people fall in different categories
> depending on the situation, that is one might be in category "1" for murder,
> category "2" for shoplifting, and category "3" for traffic offenses.
>
If I'm reading this right you mean felonies, misdemeanors, and infractions?
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