Q9300 Temp Issue

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Profile Ocean Archer
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Message 922407 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 12:34:47 UTC
Last modified: 30 Jul 2009, 12:35:22 UTC

Just finished putting together a quad-core machine utilizing a GIGABYTE GA-G31M-S2L motherboard, Q9300 CPU and 4 gig of RAM. Utilized the stock fan system that came with the CPU. XP Pro for the OS. No overclocking, just totally stock settings.

Started the system up and loaded SETI on all cores and let it run. When I got back several hours later, I found all cores were reporting temps in the mid 50s so I suspended all calculations, and let the system idle. Even at an 'idle' mode, the cores will not drop below 48 or 49C.

Is this temperature considered 'normal', or do I have to invest in some exotic cooling system to keep these temperatures under control ??
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Message 922411 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 12:50:26 UTC - in response to Message 922407.  

Just finished putting together a quad-core machine utilizing a GIGABYTE GA-G31M-S2L motherboard, Q9300 CPU and 4 gig of RAM. Utilized the stock fan system that came with the CPU. XP Pro for the OS. No overclocking, just totally stock settings.

Started the system up and loaded SETI on all cores and let it run. When I got back several hours later, I found all cores were reporting temps in the mid 50s so I suspended all calculations, and let the system idle. Even at an 'idle' mode, the cores will not drop below 48 or 49C.

Is this temperature considered 'normal', or do I have to invest in some exotic cooling system to keep these temperatures under control ??

If the cores stay below 60 - 65 deg C, then all is "cool". Idle temps seem a bit high but then that is with the stock cooler; full load temps are quite impressive without extra cooling.

F.
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Message 922415 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 13:08:29 UTC
Last modified: 30 Jul 2009, 13:10:05 UTC

My 9300 runs hot also...with a mild OC (3.0 GHz) and a so-so aftermarket cooler (and on the same MB you have), I can and do hit in the 55-60C range.
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Message 922419 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 13:19:47 UTC - in response to Message 922407.  

Just finished putting together a quad-core machine utilizing a GIGABYTE GA-G31M-S2L motherboard, Q9300 CPU and 4 gig of RAM. Utilized the stock fan system that came with the CPU. XP Pro for the OS. No overclocking, just totally stock settings.

Started the system up and loaded SETI on all cores and let it run. When I got back several hours later, I found all cores were reporting temps in the mid 50s so I suspended all calculations, and let the system idle. Even at an 'idle' mode, the cores will not drop below 48 or 49C.

Is this temperature considered 'normal', or do I have to invest in some exotic cooling system to keep these temperatures under control ??


That is well under the Thermal Specification of 71.4°C. At which point the CPU will start slowing down to protect itself. After a few days of running 24/7 my E8400 get up to about 60°C which I am OK with. When I get around to ordering a quad chip I am planning to go with an aftermarket cooler just for less noise. Not that the stock intel ones make much of it, but I figure what the hell.
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Message 922422 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 13:45:26 UTC

From what I'm reading, it is becoming more and more clear that I should invest in an after-market cooler if I plan to run this unit wide open 24/7. Obviously, I'm not interested in the CPU going 'up in a blaze of glory' ...

I must admit, I was quite concerned, since my 2-core machine seldom rises above 47-48C even when running days at a time (again, using a stock system and fan).

Thank you for your responses, and my next stop is the parts house for a different cooler and fan -- any suggestions/recommendations ??
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Message 922424 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 14:07:55 UTC - in response to Message 922422.  

From what I'm reading, it is becoming more and more clear that I should invest in an after-market cooler if I plan to run this unit wide open 24/7. Obviously, I'm not interested in the CPU going 'up in a blaze of glory' ...

I must admit, I was quite concerned, since my 2-core machine seldom rises above 47-48C even when running days at a time (again, using a stock system and fan).

Thank you for your responses, and my next stop is the parts house for a different cooler and fan -- any suggestions/recommendations ??

If it will fit in your case, the Thermalright Ultra 120 Extreme keeps my 2.66GHz Q9450 chugging along at 3.6GHz with 60C core temps. I have a Nexus (4-wire) 120mm fan fitted to it and unobstructed airflow. Have been running like that for many a long month without problems.

F.


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Message 922425 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 14:10:19 UTC - in response to Message 922422.  

A lot can depend on your case fans also. If you aren't shifting air through the case then the CPU fan is just recirculating hot air.

Then it depends on the ambient air temperature of the room you are in.

Just recently here we've had a hot spell and everything was overheating in my computer room.

If just built, I've also seen advised short burn in periods for the CPU fan to allow the heat sink compound to stabilize before running it 24/7.
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Message 922429 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 14:25:35 UTC

With respect to fans ... other than the fan dedicated to the power supply (exhausting hot air from the computer) and the fan attached to the CPU heatsink (draws air into the case and blows through the heatsink), there is one additional fan on the rear of the case, bringing air into the computer. All are operating at full-rated speeds.

Stock CPU cooling unit appears to be aluminum fins - maybe I need to spend the extra $$ and get one that is all copper to improve efficiency...

As far as the room is concerned, its just a normal room, 27-28C. I had not heard that about letting the heat sink compound stabilize -- how long should that take ??
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Message 922449 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 15:37:09 UTC

Your temps are within a very normal spec.My Q6600 runs anywhere between 68C and 74C which is perfectly normal under heavy use !!! The temps on my machine could be a little lower because I am also running a Geforce 260GTX that runn at 76C.
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Message 922453 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 15:54:26 UTC - in response to Message 922449.  
Last modified: 30 Jul 2009, 15:56:01 UTC

did you put enough thermal compound on the heat sink?

i just recently took off the dell paste and put some sliver compound on....


on my q6600, my max temps are just under 60 c.

57
58
52
54

i've never seen it go above 60 c. in my hot 80 F room.
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Message 922458 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 16:28:30 UTC

Hmmmm - silver compound paste - never run across that before. I've always utilized the traditional white goop that hangs on the wall at your local RadioShack store. Guess I need to do some more resech, and possibly change thermal paste before buying a new cooler system. I'll pass along what I discover on this subject.

Thanks again for all the brain-storming/knowledge
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Message 922462 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 16:50:03 UTC - in response to Message 922453.  

did you put enough thermal compound on the heat sink?


Back in the old days when I was working for a parts distributor we sold heatsinks by Alutronic. They always told us to use less compound. The function of the compound is only to smoothen the barrier between heatsink and, in this case, processor. To much of it will actually worsen cooling capacity. See: Some info on heatsinks
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Message 922464 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 16:51:49 UTC - in response to Message 922458.  
Last modified: 30 Jul 2009, 16:52:05 UTC

i picked up a tube from best buy b/c i had pulled the heat-sink off one day and there wasn't much left of the dell install... and so i picked up some, coated the entire plate of the copper heat sink...
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Message 922472 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 17:40:32 UTC - in response to Message 922429.  

With respect to fans ... other than the fan dedicated to the power supply (exhausting hot air from the computer) and the fan attached to the CPU heatsink (draws air into the case and blows through the heatsink), there is one additional fan on the rear of the case, bringing air into the computer. All are operating at full-rated speeds.

Stock CPU cooling unit appears to be aluminum fins - maybe I need to spend the extra $$ and get one that is all copper to improve efficiency...

As far as the room is concerned, its just a normal room, 27-28C. I had not heard that about letting the heat sink compound stabilize -- how long should that take ??

Question: Do you intend to overclock your rig? If not, then all is fine as it is. If you do intend to then:

Arctic Silver 5 has always served me well as a thermal compound and their web site shows how to apply (any) thermal compound - as little as possible.

You may have to think about turning the fan on the rear of the case round so that it takes air OUT of the case. Once the heat has been removed from the CPU by the CPU cooler it has to be got out of the case as quickly as possible and, from what you say, there is no fan currently doing that.

Copper is heavy and the thermal properties of aluminium not much worse so don't worry about the metal used. There is plenty of info on the web about performance of after-market coolers. How you apply the "goop", (and whether you lap the surfaces to aid heat transfer) is much more important.

F.
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Message 922476 - Posted: 30 Jul 2009, 18:04:43 UTC - in response to Message 922472.  

Hello,

my Q6600@3GHZ-CPU-Cooler (Arctic Silver 5 paste) is the "Gross-Glockner" in an Antec 9-Hundred case (2x120mm to get air into and 1x120mm + 1x200mm to get air out).

Temperatur is below 60° while running Seti.


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Message 922578 - Posted: 31 Jul 2009, 3:23:07 UTC
Last modified: 31 Jul 2009, 3:26:28 UTC

You might want to take a peek over at Silent PC. If you are worried about noise in any way. I have had good luck with thermalright in the past and I'll probably get another cooler from them for the quad chippy.

I have read from several places that it is recomended to regoop our heatsink every 12 months. I guess my old 3Ghz P4 would use some fresh stuff after 3 or 4 years now.
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Message 922585 - Posted: 31 Jul 2009, 3:52:43 UTC - in response to Message 922578.  

i have one that was bought in 03'... 6 years without anything except memory, cleaning and a hd. and the fanless heat sink wieghs a lot.. one of those square blocks of aluminum.
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Message 922643 - Posted: 31 Jul 2009, 12:31:45 UTC - in response to Message 922407.  

Just finished putting together a quad-core machine utilizing a GIGABYTE GA-G31M-S2L motherboard, Q9300 CPU and 4 gig of RAM. Utilized the stock fan system that came with the CPU. XP Pro for the OS. No overclocking, just totally stock settings.

Started the system up and loaded SETI on all cores and let it run. When I got back several hours later, I found all cores were reporting temps in the mid 50s so I suspended all calculations, and let the system idle. Even at an 'idle' mode, the cores will not drop below 48 or 49C.

Is this temperature considered 'normal', or do I have to invest in some exotic cooling system to keep these temperatures under control ??



Nothing wrong with those temps. Remember, use as LITTLE thermal paste as possible. Use good quality, like Arctic Silver and finally, after any new CPU & heat sink joining it will take at least 30 heat up / cool down cycles before the thermal compound "settles in". You can expect temps to drop several degrees over that time. I know it's a bit of a pain when you leave your system on all the time but doing the on / off cycles for the first few weeks will be worth it.
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Message 922666 - Posted: 31 Jul 2009, 14:10:38 UTC - in response to Message 922424.  

From what I'm reading, it is becoming more and more clear that I should invest in an after-market cooler if I plan to run this unit wide open 24/7. Obviously, I'm not interested in the CPU going 'up in a blaze of glory' ...

I must admit, I was quite concerned, since my 2-core machine seldom rises above 47-48C even when running days at a time (again, using a stock system and fan).

Thank you for your responses, and my next stop is the parts house for a different cooler and fan -- any suggestions/recommendations ??

If it will fit in your case, the Thermalright Ultra 120 Extreme keeps my 2.66GHz Q9450 chugging along at 3.6GHz with 60C core temps. I have a Nexus (4-wire) 120mm fan fitted to it and unobstructed airflow. Have been running like that for many a long month without problems.

F.




Oh yes, those Nexus PWM fans are brilliant - I've got three in total, in my humble E6550 PC (in, out, CPU) and using Arctic Silver on a Scythe Ninja 2 has paid dividends. An o/c to around 2.7 GHz still sees the CPU temp at 48C at full load and an idle temp of 35C, although that may depend on how hot it gets in the room where the PC is. Having said that, when it has been really warm recently, the CPU has been running, at idle, 2C cooler than the system!

I also have a PC that has a Q6600, a copper version of the Ninja 2, still using the Nexus fans (except for the standard Scythe unit on the HSF) and also running on an MSI P35 Platinum and at full load, running at a similar speed, it runs at slightly higher temps. One day soon, I'll get that one crunching on S@H. From that, you could deduce that there is little difference between using a copper cooler and an aluminium one - there again, someone might point out the extra 2 cores! When all is said and done, those 120mm Nexus PWM (4 wire connection) fans move lots of air.....






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Message 923072 - Posted: 2 Aug 2009, 1:31:06 UTC - in response to Message 922429.  

With respect to fans ... other than the fan dedicated to the power supply (exhausting hot air from the computer) and the fan attached to the CPU heatsink (draws air into the case and blows through the heatsink), there is one additional fan on the rear of the case, bringing air into the computer. All are operating at full-rated speeds.


Typically, the rear case fan should blow OUT of the case. There should also be a fan or at least an inlet in the front or lower-side. Running completely stock Intel heatsinks will work, but they are not designed for 24/7 crunching or overclocking of any kind.

Also, if you decide on a new heatsink/fan, note that Intel stock heatsinks come with a waxy thermal compound that is extremely difficult to get off the chip. You should research what compounds to purchase to properly remove this wax before putting a new heatsink on the CPU. The reason you want to do this is because the wax will hurt cooling performance once you use "real" thermal compound.
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