Small Word (Sep 20 2007)

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Simon Wiesenthal

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Message 652138 - Posted: 1 Oct 2007, 3:42:36 UTC
Last modified: 1 Oct 2007, 3:52:06 UTC

How hard could it be to program SETI@home to run optimized for a given machine?

Wouldn't that be more efficient and simpler than all of this ridiculous arguing over how large a cache should or should not be?

If such a setting already exists, kindly direct me to it, and I'll be glad to use it.

Lastly, would someone kindly tell me, without delivering a doctoral dissertation on the subject, the name of one BOINC physics project and one BOINC biology project that will work well with SETI@home without wasting too much time, power, and wear and tear to complete work units whose shelf life expires during outages?
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Message 652172 - Posted: 1 Oct 2007, 5:46:09 UTC - in response to Message 652138.  

Lastly, would someone kindly tell me, without delivering a doctoral dissertation on the subject, the name of one BOINC physics project and one BOINC biology project that will work well with SETI@home without wasting too much time, power, and wear and tear to complete work units whose shelf life expires during outages?


I am probably wrong on this, but I've simply set my cache higher. Most outages don't last too long and it gets rid of most of the 'dead' periods when WU's aren't being generated and/or distributed.

In the 'olden days', I simply ran another program. It was a CPU-intensive program that was more an oddity than effective, but it kept my computer busy.

- Jim

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Grant (SSSF)
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Message 652199 - Posted: 1 Oct 2007, 8:41:43 UTC - in response to Message 652138.  

How hard could it be to program SETI@home to run optimized for a given machine?

?
It takes quite a bit of effort, but there are a couple of optimised applications available.


Wouldn't that be more efficient and simpler than all of this ridiculous arguing over how large a cache should or should not be?

What does the efficiency of the application have to do with cache sizes?


Lastly, would someone kindly tell me, without delivering a doctoral dissertation on the subject, the name of one BOINC physics project and one BOINC biology project that will work well with SETI@home without wasting too much time, power, and wear and tear to complete work units whose shelf life expires during outages?

I've got no idea what this question is.
BOINC allows you to run multiple projects.
You choose the ones you want to run, set which ones get the priority & then let it go. If you run more than one project, a cache setting of less than a day (or better yet, only a couple of hours) is best.
Grant
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takukas

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Message 652238 - Posted: 1 Oct 2007, 11:31:45 UTC

Hi!

We should not forget that SETI asks for our PCs cycles when it is IDLE. And you have to think that some people actually do that. If BOINC is configured to work only when a PC is idle, then it might actually take a while before a WU is completed. You have to think of people that have their PCs on only when they work on them not 24/7 and they ACTUALLY work on them.

Bear with some pending credit, it does actually balance in the long run.

Best,

Minas
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Message 652281 - Posted: 1 Oct 2007, 13:24:53 UTC - in response to Message 652138.  

How hard could it be to program SETI@home to run optimized for a given machine?

Wouldn't that be more efficient and simpler than all of this ridiculous arguing over how large a cache should or should not be?


You are confusing processor cache (L1/L2) for WU cache. The cache we are talking about here is WU cache, which has nothing to do with an optimized application.

Lastly, would someone kindly tell me, without delivering a doctoral dissertation on the subject, the name of one BOINC physics project and one BOINC biology project that will work well with SETI@home without wasting too much time, power, and wear and tear to complete work units whose shelf life expires during outages?


Well, there are many physics and biology projects that exist. I'm sure they all work well alongside SETI@Home. Which ones don't waste too much power or "wear and tear" I suppose would be anyone's guess. You'd have to ask the developers of each project exactly how much optimizations go into their science app, as a highly optimized app would produce the most work with the littlest effort.

Outages? Well, I haven't seen any projects promising 100% uptime. Some have better than SETI@Home, but none have the user base of SETI@Home nor are many a guinea pig for the BOINC platform like SETI@Home is.
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William Davis

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Message 652299 - Posted: 1 Oct 2007, 14:07:33 UTC - in response to Message 652138.  


Lastly, would someone kindly tell me, without delivering a doctoral dissertation on the subject, the name of one BOINC physics project and one BOINC biology project that will work well with SETI@home without wasting too much time, power, and wear and tear to complete work units whose shelf life expires during outages?


Personally I like World Community Grid project Discovering Dengue Drugs - Together.

See http://www.worldcommunitygrid.org/index.jsp

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Message 652353 - Posted: 1 Oct 2007, 15:57:19 UTC - in response to Message 652138.  

How hard could it be to program SETI@home to run optimized for a given machine?

Wouldn't that be more efficient and simpler than all of this ridiculous arguing over how large a cache should or should not be?


These are different issues. If anything, a faster (optimized) application requires more work, and that puts a little more pressure on the servers.

An optimized application needs a slightly larger cache (in terms of number of work units, not days) to stay busy.

Lastly, would someone kindly tell me, without delivering a doctoral dissertation on the subject, the name of one BOINC physics project and one BOINC biology project that will work well with SETI@home without wasting too much time, power, and wear and tear to complete work units whose shelf life expires during outages?

If you give SETI a resource share of 100, and another project a resource share of 10, then BOINC will give the other project one hour for every ten spent on BOINC. It doesn't matter which other projects you run.

If you download a work unit for another project, BOINC will finish it on time even if it has to devote extra resources to it. That "debt" will be paid back.
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Message 652368 - Posted: 1 Oct 2007, 16:46:21 UTC - in response to Message 652138.  
Last modified: 1 Oct 2007, 16:48:22 UTC

How hard could it be to program SETI@home to run optimized for a given machine?

Wouldn't that be more efficient and simpler than all of this ridiculous arguing over how large a cache should or should not be?

If such a setting already exists, kindly direct me to it, and I'll be glad to use it.

Lastly, would someone kindly tell me, without delivering a doctoral dissertation on the subject, the name of one BOINC physics project and one BOINC biology project that will work well with SETI@home without wasting too much time, power, and wear and tear to complete work units whose shelf life expires during outages?

I am running SETI, Einstein@home and QMC@home on an old PII Deschutes in a Linux environment meeting all deadlines. My shares are Einstein 300, SETI and QMC 100.
Tullio
Of course this means 24/7.
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Message 652613 - Posted: 2 Oct 2007, 1:37:20 UTC - in response to Message 652138.  
Last modified: 2 Oct 2007, 1:37:35 UTC

How hard could it be to program SETI@home to run optimized for a given machine?

Volunteer developers have done so for many platforms. See the Optimized Applications sticky thread in the NC forum. These apps will not get automatically updated by BOINC, so require that you keep half an ear open for new versions; they are also run-at-your-own-risk as far as the project is concerned but, in the spirit of open-source development, there is plenty of communication—if not quite collaboration—between the ‘third parties’ and the project team.

Lastly, would someone kindly tell me, without delivering a doctoral dissertation on the subject, the name of one BOINC physics project and one BOINC biology project that will work well with SETI@home without wasting too much time, power, and wear and tear to complete work units whose shelf life expires during outages?

Physics: Einstein@home. Biochemistry: Rosetta@home. These both have numerous participants (only S@h has more, according to BOINCstats), and are very rarely unavailable (in part because of their well-funded server infrastructure). And both have cool graphics, if you care for such frivolities.

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Message boards : Technical News : Small Word (Sep 20 2007)


 
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