SETI on PIII 600Mhz

Message boards : Number crunching : SETI on PIII 600Mhz
Message board moderation

To post messages, you must log in.

1 · 2 · Next

AuthorMessage
Martin

Send message
Joined: 30 Jan 06
Posts: 4
Credit: 341
RAC: 0
Germany
Message 453306 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 8:22:21 UTC
Last modified: 8 Nov 2006, 8:22:44 UTC

Hi,
I just started crunching again on a PIII 600Mhz. But it says that there are 31h remaining. I think this is not normal (last year the same computer needed about 12h)

Any ideas?

Thank you :)
ID: 453306 · Report as offensive
W-K 666 Project Donor
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 18 May 99
Posts: 19218
Credit: 40,757,560
RAC: 67
United Kingdom
Message 453309 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 8:29:09 UTC - in response to Message 453306.  
Last modified: 8 Nov 2006, 8:29:27 UTC

Hi,
I just started crunching again on a PIII 600Mhz. But it says that there are 31h remaining. I think this is not normal (last year the same computer needed about 12h)

Any ideas?

Thank you :)

Thats probably a time predicted by your benchmark figures, Also now we are crunching Enhanced Seti the crunch time vary considerably with the Angle_Range (AR) of the unit. So without further info no-one can say wether this is a realistic time prediction or not.

See the 'Enhanced FAQ' thread at top of page for more info, and think about optimised application also in thread at top of page.
ID: 453309 · Report as offensive
Martin

Send message
Joined: 30 Jan 06
Posts: 4
Credit: 341
RAC: 0
Germany
Message 453310 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 8:31:10 UTC

Which further informations do you need?
ID: 453310 · Report as offensive
Profile John Clark
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 29 Sep 99
Posts: 16515
Credit: 4,418,829
RAC: 0
United Kingdom
Message 453320 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 9:01:42 UTC

As a sort of benchmark comparison, I am running a 700MHz P Coppermine laptop (see my Win98SE machine) for the WU stats.

But, off the top of my head a 62 Cobblestone WU is done in about 15 hours.
It's good to be back amongst friends and colleagues



ID: 453320 · Report as offensive
Richard Haselgrove Project Donor
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 4 Jul 99
Posts: 14660
Credit: 200,643,578
RAC: 874
United Kingdom
Message 453323 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 9:22:34 UTC

And my 350MHz PII takes about 38 hours....

These 62 credit WUs are the commonest, but of course you won't know what credit you're going to be awarded until it finishes! You could check out whether any of the other three computers crunching the same WU have reported yet, and see what credit they've claimed (but there are still some old versions of BOINC out there which don't claim the same credit as current versions): or you can get a rough idea from the deadline assigned by Berkeley. 62 credits means a deadline of about 25 days - plenty of time for your PIII to finish if you allow it to run for at least a couple of hours a day on average.
ID: 453323 · Report as offensive
Martin

Send message
Joined: 30 Jan 06
Posts: 4
Credit: 341
RAC: 0
Germany
Message 453349 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 11:47:15 UTC - in response to Message 453320.  
Last modified: 8 Nov 2006, 12:19:02 UTC

As a sort of benchmark comparison, I am running a 700MHz P Coppermine laptop (see my Win98SE machine) for the WU stats.

But, off the top of my head a 62 Cobblestone WU is done in about 15 hours.

My computer is a laptop, too. And it's nearly the same processor (mine is 600Mhz Coppermine) but my computer needs 32h :(

ID: 453349 · Report as offensive
Profile John Clark
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 29 Sep 99
Posts: 16515
Credit: 4,418,829
RAC: 0
United Kingdom
Message 453366 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 12:34:48 UTC - in response to Message 453349.  

As a sort of benchmark comparison, I am running a 700MHz P Coppermine laptop (see my Win98SE machine) for the WU stats.

But, off the top of my head a 62 Cobblestone WU is done in about 15 hours.

My computer is a laptop, too. And it's nearly the same processor (mine is 600Mhz Coppermine) but my computer needs 32h :(


The BOINC Manager estimates up to 35 hours on some of my new WUs, after they are downloaded. After they have actually been crunched, they report in the region of 15-17 hours.

Indeed I currently have a 25 hour prediction waiting to run, and I think this will finally be completed in 11 hrs to 12 hours when it sends back the results.
It's good to be back amongst friends and colleagues



ID: 453366 · Report as offensive
Profile mikey
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 17 Dec 99
Posts: 4215
Credit: 3,474,603
RAC: 0
United States
Message 453375 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 12:44:17 UTC - in response to Message 453349.  

As a sort of benchmark comparison, I am running a 700MHz P Coppermine laptop (see my Win98SE machine) for the WU stats.

But, off the top of my head a 62 Cobblestone WU is done in about 15 hours.

My computer is a laptop, too. And it's nearly the same processor (mine is 600Mhz Coppermine) but my computer needs 32h :(

Is your laptop a Celeron? If so that is a major part of the problem, Celerons, Semprons, Durons, etc all have small L2 Caches and therefore swap the program to the harddrive while running, slowing the process down significantly.

ID: 453375 · Report as offensive
Martin

Send message
Joined: 30 Jan 06
Posts: 4
Credit: 341
RAC: 0
Germany
Message 453400 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 13:20:29 UTC
Last modified: 8 Nov 2006, 13:23:40 UTC

No, it's not a Celeron. Here are its details: http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/show_host_detail.php?hostid=2147405

497Mhz is displayed but it is an 600Mhz PIII Coppermine... weird.
ID: 453400 · Report as offensive
Richard Haselgrove Project Donor
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 4 Jul 99
Posts: 14660
Credit: 200,643,578
RAC: 874
United Kingdom
Message 453405 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 13:25:37 UTC - in response to Message 453366.  

The BOINC Manager estimates up to 35 hours on some of my new WUs, after they are downloaded. After they have actually been crunched, they report in the region of 15-17 hours.

Indeed I currently have a 25 hour prediction waiting to run, and I think this will finally be completed in 11 hrs to 12 hours when it sends back the results.

BOINC will slowly 'learn' how fast your machine really crunches, and the estimates will get closer to reality. May take the best part of a month, though, as the usual guideline is 20 - 30 completed WUs.
ID: 453405 · Report as offensive
Ingleside
Volunteer developer

Send message
Joined: 4 Feb 03
Posts: 1546
Credit: 15,832,022
RAC: 13
Norway
Message 453411 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 13:31:23 UTC - in response to Message 453401.  

I'm very intrigued at one of your computers that seems to be a PIII, but appears to have 2 cpu's??? That would explain an RAC of ~200, but I didn't think the PIII's had more than 1 CPU. Love to know what it is.


A single cpu having multiple Cores is fairly new then it comes to X86-cpu's, but having mainboards that can fit 2 or more cpu's is old technology. I've owned both dual-p2 and dual-p3-system.

"I make so many mistakes. But then just think of all the mistakes I don't make, although I might."
ID: 453411 · Report as offensive
Profile John Clark
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 29 Sep 99
Posts: 16515
Credit: 4,418,829
RAC: 0
United Kingdom
Message 453641 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 20:39:40 UTC - in response to Message 453401.  
Last modified: 8 Nov 2006, 20:41:35 UTC

I'm very intrigued at one of your computers that seems to be a PIII, but appears to have 2 cpu's??? That would explain an RAC of ~200, but I didn't think the PIII's had more than 1 CPU. Love to know what it is.

Chris


You are quite correct Chris.

I have 2 dual CPU rigs ... my old one is a dual PIII Coppermine, running at 933MHz, and P3 were capable of being dualed without any special preparation other than the MoBo.

My P3 dual uses a SuperMicro server board, which does not allow overclocking, etc. The only tweek I have managed is using aggressive clock timings on the memory.

This gained me about 5%, and made up for some of the losses of shared memory, small L2 and shared FSB (running at 133MHz). These run to about 20% to 25%.

You can see the effects give similar WU completion times to my single CPU P3, originally a 750MHz Coppermine overclocked mildly to 840MHz (100MHz FSB running at 112MHz).
It's good to be back amongst friends and colleagues



ID: 453641 · Report as offensive
Profile John Clark
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 29 Sep 99
Posts: 16515
Credit: 4,418,829
RAC: 0
United Kingdom
Message 453651 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 20:49:29 UTC - in response to Message 453405.  
Last modified: 8 Nov 2006, 20:51:03 UTC

The BOINC Manager estimates up to 35 hours on some of my new WUs, after they are downloaded. After they have actually been crunched, they report in the region of 15-17 hours.

Indeed I currently have a 25 hour prediction waiting to run, and I think this will finally be completed in 11 hrs to 12 hours when it sends back the results.

BOINC will slowly 'learn' how fast your machine really crunches, and the estimates will get closer to reality. May take the best part of a month, though, as the usual guideline is 20 - 30 completed WUs.


This may be true, but it will still estimate well above the real crunch times, as in my case. I have been running BOINC since the start of SETI_Enhanced, and the estimates are still well above.

The WU I have just completed (~30 cobblestones) was originally estimated to take 25.5 hours, before starting. The actual crunch tome, before it uploaded and corrected the result, was 15.5 hours (approximately). However, checking the reported, and corrected, crunch time shows it took just over 11 hours.
It's good to be back amongst friends and colleagues



ID: 453651 · Report as offensive
1mp0£173
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 3 Apr 99
Posts: 8423
Credit: 356,897
RAC: 0
United States
Message 453658 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 20:54:53 UTC - in response to Message 453411.  

I'm very intrigued at one of your computers that seems to be a PIII, but appears to have 2 cpu's??? That would explain an RAC of ~200, but I didn't think the PIII's had more than 1 CPU. Love to know what it is.


A single cpu having multiple Cores is fairly new then it comes to X86-cpu's, but having mainboards that can fit 2 or more cpu's is old technology. I've owned both dual-p2 and dual-p3-system.

I've got a dual pentium-pro in my "boneyard."
ID: 453658 · Report as offensive
OzzFan Crowdfunding Project Donor*Special Project $75 donorSpecial Project $250 donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 9 Apr 02
Posts: 15691
Credit: 84,761,841
RAC: 28
United States
Message 453672 - Posted: 8 Nov 2006, 21:47:22 UTC - in response to Message 453658.  

I'm very intrigued at one of your computers that seems to be a PIII, but appears to have 2 cpu's??? That would explain an RAC of ~200, but I didn't think the PIII's had more than 1 CPU. Love to know what it is.


A single cpu having multiple Cores is fairly new then it comes to X86-cpu's, but having mainboards that can fit 2 or more cpu's is old technology. I've owned both dual-p2 and dual-p3-system.

I've got a dual pentium-pro in my "boneyard."


Dual Pentium Pro 200 upgraded to the Pentium II 333 "Overdrive" with 512MB RAM running Windows NT 4.0 server (down due to power cost restrictions).

My current file and print server is a dual Pentium III 700MHz (thinking about spending a little money and going up to dual 850s which can be had off eBay for about $40 each) with 1GB RAM and 3 HDDs (10GB system drive, 120GB data drive and 300GB media drive - needing a 750GB badly!).

Many other older "dualies" that I want to get to complete my museum, if costs weren't so prohibitive.
ID: 453672 · Report as offensive
Profile KD [SETI.USA]
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 24 Oct 99
Posts: 460
Credit: 2,513,131
RAC: 0
United States
Message 457965 - Posted: 14 Nov 2006, 22:43:40 UTC - in response to Message 455136.  

You are quite correct Chris.

I have 2 dual CPU rigs ... my old one is a dual PIII Coppermine, running at 933MHz, and P3 were capable of being dualed without any special preparation other than the MoBo.

My P3 dual uses a SuperMicro server board, which does not allow overclocking, etc. The only tweek I have managed is using aggressive clock timings on the memory.

This gained me about 5%, and made up for some of the losses of shared memory, small L2 and shared FSB (running at 133MHz). These run to about 20% to 25%.

You can see the effects give similar WU completion times to my single CPU P3, originally a 750MHz Coppermine overclocked mildly to 840MHz (100MHz FSB running at 112MHz).


Thanks John, hadn't initially thought of a dual CPU board. I didn't think that PIII dualies were that common but it appears they are/were.


They were uncommonly common.

I built quite a number of dual P3's back between '99 and '00 -- for myself, friends, family, co-workers.. Slot1's and later 370's.

I also leaned towards Supermicro m/b's as well. Supermicro, along with Asus, were one of the only board manufacturers that gave you not only duals, onboard SCSI, but (at the time) more importantly AGP. Most of the "server boards" then didn't have AGP.

As others have said, you can find them today on Ebay for next to nothing. Even populated with dual 1Ghz (370) P3's and 1GB ECC, I've seen them for $50. They are great today for home LAN server type stuff. They will web, email, word process, etc, just as fast as anything new. ...and, of course, crunch SETI.

Remembering back here... With the Supermicro SL1 boards, look for the voltage controller IC. If it ends in "BCB", you can run 1Ghz Coppermines -- otherwise you are limited to Katmai's up to, if I remember right, 700Mhz.



ID: 457965 · Report as offensive
1mp0£173
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 3 Apr 99
Posts: 8423
Credit: 356,897
RAC: 0
United States
Message 457968 - Posted: 14 Nov 2006, 22:49:37 UTC - in response to Message 453672.  


Dual Pentium Pro 200 upgraded to the Pentium II 333 "Overdrive" with 512MB RAM running Windows NT 4.0 server (down due to power cost restrictions).

My Dual P-Pro has been replaced with an 800 MHz Via C3 -- it's under 50w.
ID: 457968 · Report as offensive
Profile miketoth1001
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 18 May 99
Posts: 2
Credit: 81,048
RAC: 0
United States
Message 457971 - Posted: 14 Nov 2006, 22:58:38 UTC - in response to Message 457965.  

I also leaned towards Supermicro m/b's as well. Supermicro, along with Asus, were one of the only board manufacturers that gave you not only duals, onboard SCSI, but (at the time) more importantly AGP. Most of the "server boards" then didn't have AGP.


I have an older Gigabyte GA-6BXDS

http://www.gigabyte.com.tw/Support/Motherboard/Manual_Model.aspx?ProductID=1474

It tops out at 600-MHz, with the last BIOS update. Dual CPUs, SCSI, RAIDport AND AGP port. I've had it for quite a while, and it's never even hiccupped once.

Yeah. BOINC, and SETI, might be a bit slow, but it's reliable.
ID: 457971 · Report as offensive
nairb

Send message
Joined: 18 Mar 03
Posts: 201
Credit: 5,447,501
RAC: 5
United Kingdom
Message 458059 - Posted: 15 Nov 2006, 0:16:55 UTC

I also like the dual m/b. I have several of the supermicro dual xeon boards. They only take a max 700mhz xeons but take cheap ram, old hard disks and have never crashed. The 700's take between 5 & 16 hrs to do a wu. Dead cheap off ebay too.
ID: 458059 · Report as offensive
Profile tekwyzrd
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 21 Nov 01
Posts: 767
Credit: 30,009
RAC: 0
United States
Message 458107 - Posted: 15 Nov 2006, 1:11:51 UTC - in response to Message 457965.  


Remembering back here... With the Supermicro SL1 boards, look for the voltage controller IC. If it ends in "BCB", you can run 1Ghz Coppermines -- otherwise you are limited to Katmai's up to, if I remember right, 700Mhz.


I have a Supermicro P6DBE I plan to put back into operation in a computer for my mother. I paid about $174 for it when I bought it new in 1999. I've seen them on eBay for approx. $16 (used). It was a very dependable board for windows but led to some problems with SuSE. Overall Supermicro boards are a good choice.

Just watch out for the leaking capacitors that commonly plagued boards produced around 2000 - 2002. I have a newer Supermicro board (PIIIDM3) that has a bit dielectric on a few caps next to one of the slots that won't recognize the presence of CPU0. The problem occurred after rumming my 700MHz p3s @ 933MHz non-stop for approx. six months. Maybe one of these days I'll scrounge up some caps to fix it. It was fast compared to most P3s due to it's use of interleaved (dual channel) memory.

Nothing travels faster than the speed of light with the possible exception of bad news, which obeys its own special laws.
Douglas Adams (1952 - 2001)
ID: 458107 · Report as offensive
1 · 2 · Next

Message boards : Number crunching : SETI on PIII 600Mhz


 
©2024 University of California
 
SETI@home and Astropulse are funded by grants from the National Science Foundation, NASA, and donations from SETI@home volunteers. AstroPulse is funded in part by the NSF through grant AST-0307956.