Zombie Stars now???

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rob smithProject Donor
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Message 1899999 - Posted: 9 Nov 2017, 10:12:01 UTC

After Zombie Apocalypse, Dawn, etc we have:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-41916738
Bob Smith
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Somewhere in the (un)known Universe?
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syffy c

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Message 1900107 - Posted: 10 Nov 2017, 0:07:01 UTC - in response to Message 1899999.  

Writing in a news and views article published in Nature, Prof Stan Woosley, from the University of California, Santa Cruz, said that in the Pulsational Pair Instability theory, a massive star may lose about half its mass before the series of violent pulses begins.

Not everything we know about the "zombie" matches this theory, Prof Woosley added, and many uncertainties remain.

"As of now, no detailed model has been published that can explain the observed emission and constant temperature of iPTF14hls, let alone the possible eruption 60 years ago," he wrote.

"For now, the supernova offers astronomers their greatest thrill: something they do not understand."
(from Rob Smith's link)

Thanks. Ties in somewhat with the discussion in the Universe thread.
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Profile tullioProject Donor
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Message 1900246 - Posted: 10 Nov 2017, 16:15:01 UTC

I remember observing a star in full daylight in 1954. Maybe it was the same star now called a zombie. Its 1954 explosion was found in archived images.
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Profile LynnProject Donor
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Message 1900494 - Posted: 11 Nov 2017, 7:25:11 UTC - in response to Message 1900246.  

I read where matter and antimatter might keep this Zombie Star going. They say it's a theory for now. Space is grand!
ET Phone Home
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Message 1900639 - Posted: 12 Nov 2017, 2:54:49 UTC - in response to Message 1900246.  

I remember observing a star in full daylight in 1954. Maybe it was the same star now called a zombie. Its 1954 explosion was found in archived images.
Tullio
That must have been bright! Wow!


@Lynn

I read where matter and antimatter might keep this Zombie Star going. They say it's a theory for now. Space is grand!
+1.

Sure is! :-)
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moomin
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Message 1900643 - Posted: 12 Nov 2017, 3:21:58 UTC - in response to Message 1900246.  

I remember observing a star in full daylight in 1954. Maybe it was the same star now called a zombie. Its 1954 explosion was found in archived images.
Tullio

This giant star in the nearby galaxy NGC 2403 (left) erupted in 1954, spawning a massive cloud of dust resembling Eta Carinae in our Milky Way (right).

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2005/06/supernova-wasnt
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Sir Rodney Ffing
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Message 1901037 - Posted: 14 Nov 2017, 11:05:56 UTC

Zombies and faked deaths. :-) Superb!
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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Zombie Stars now???


 
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