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Michael Watson

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Message 1899301 - Posted: 5 Nov 2017, 14:29:11 UTC - in response to Message 1899243.  

Of course, there are (seemingly) infinite possibilities in how we progress through our lives, but I think what we do here in the world we all know is a one-way street.


If that were true, then there's no concept of choice or free will. I.e. "Everything that happens, happens for a reason and couldn't have happened any other way." That kind of thinking is very problematic, to put it politely.


Would it really be preferable if we could say things happen for no reason? That sounds like chaos to me.
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Message 1899302 - Posted: 5 Nov 2017, 14:41:41 UTC - in response to Message 1899301.  

Of course, there are (seemingly) infinite possibilities in how we progress through our lives, but I think what we do here in the world we all know is a one-way street.


If that were true, then there's no concept of choice or free will. I.e. "Everything that happens, happens for a reason and couldn't have happened any other way." That kind of thinking is very problematic, to put it politely.


Would it really be preferable if we could say things happen for no reason? That sounds like chaos to me.


It would be preferable if we said things happen by random chance, as is the case. Reason is just a human attempt to apply justification to an event and form judgments. "Chaos" is one of those judgments.
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Michael Watson

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Message 1899303 - Posted: 5 Nov 2017, 14:45:48 UTC - in response to Message 1899251.  


Scientists baffled: Universe shouldn't exist


Scientists will never figure out how The Universe Works.


Perhaps not, but they might figure out why it wasn't long ago destroyed by the mutual annihilation of matter and antimatter, as per the linked article. Antimatter might fall away from matter, instead of toward it, as ordinary matter does. That would keep the two apart, and prevent destruction. The possibility of antigravity antimatter is apparently to be tested. If it exists, this has some other interesting implications, besides saving the universe.
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Michael Watson

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Message 1899459 - Posted: 6 Nov 2017, 3:37:42 UTC - in response to Message 1899302.  

Of course, there are (seemingly) infinite possibilities in how we progress through our lives, but I think what we do here in the world we all know is a one-way street.


If that were true, then there's no concept of choice or free will. I.e. "Everything that happens, happens for a reason and couldn't have happened any other way." That kind of thinking is very problematic, to put it politely.


Would it really be preferable if we could say things happen for no reason? That sounds like chaos to me.


It would be preferable if we said things happen by random chance, as is the case. Reason is just a human attempt to apply justification to an event and form judgments. "Chaos" is one of those judgments.


I suspect that many things which appear to occur by random chance might be seen as happening as part of an orderly pattern, if we has sufficient knowledge of all the causative factors affecting these events.
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Message 1899559 - Posted: 6 Nov 2017, 17:32:01 UTC
Last modified: 6 Nov 2017, 17:40:48 UTC

Why am I perhaps being told that it is still supposed to be science?

Good figures, if not any drawings, by OzzFan here, at the bottom, explaining this way of evolution for that of the Universe.

But next, is such a thing as Quarks perhaps the same as any Quantum mechanics, except for the similarity of the words themselves?

But rather that we are living in an inflationary Universe, which supposedly came out of nothing, next making for both a given Existence, if not also a presence.

Make it perhaps science one day and next that of possible Religion the other day and also you could end up asking a couple of Philosophical questions as well.

Sometimes these things could be related, while other times perhaps not, but my guess is that some of these questions are still left for the scientists to make definitive answers.
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Message 1899562 - Posted: 6 Nov 2017, 17:51:02 UTC

Way back in my first post 1899055 I said that I saw the universe as infinite with lots of smaller universes within it as a result of local big bangs. But these mini universes of mine are millions or billions of light years apart.

This concept of parallel universes or multiverses seems to be where you can just simply step next door into someone elses life, I don't buy that.

I also don't buy the concept of curved space. We know that gravity can curve light, but that is light as an item within space, not space itself. Time travel, na forget it science fiction.
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Message 1899586 - Posted: 6 Nov 2017, 20:03:15 UTC - in response to Message 1899562.  

I also don't buy the concept of curved space. We know that gravity can curve light, but that is light as an item within space, not space itself.

Chris the distortion of space/time has been proven. If it did not the LIGO detectors would not work. If you think their recent findings are a fraud you are joining the flat earth society.
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Message 1899621 - Posted: 6 Nov 2017, 22:35:01 UTC - in response to Message 1899459.  

Of course, there are (seemingly) infinite possibilities in how we progress through our lives, but I think what we do here in the world we all know is a one-way street.


If that were true, then there's no concept of choice or free will. I.e. "Everything that happens, happens for a reason and couldn't have happened any other way." That kind of thinking is very problematic, to put it politely.


Would it really be preferable if we could say things happen for no reason? That sounds like chaos to me.


It would be preferable if we said things happen by random chance, as is the case. Reason is just a human attempt to apply justification to an event and form judgments. "Chaos" is one of those judgments.


I suspect that many things which appear to occur by random chance might be seen as happening as part of an orderly pattern, if we has sufficient knowledge of all the causative factors affecting these events.


I would agree that the mechanics of the Universe tend to happen in what appears to be orderly, however the actual progression of certain events is by pure chance and random probability.
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Message 1899636 - Posted: 7 Nov 2017, 0:50:20 UTC - in response to Message 1899621.  

I would agree that the mechanics of the Universe tend to happen in what appears to be orderly, however the actual progression of certain events is by pure chance and random probability.


Which next should be yet another indication that the Universe perhaps is not having a divine Creator for its initial moment of creation and next what also the latter is supposed to be.
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Message 1899652 - Posted: 7 Nov 2017, 3:39:42 UTC

Back in July, I read about a particle that was believed to be both anti-matter and matter. Might have no relevance to the current topic, but thought I'd post it anyway.

Angel particles
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Message 1899704 - Posted: 7 Nov 2017, 10:58:24 UTC - in response to Message 1899652.  
Last modified: 7 Nov 2017, 11:00:02 UTC

Back in July, I read about a particle that was believed to be both anti-matter and matter. Might have no relevance to the current topic, but thought I'd post it anyway.

Angel particles



Interesting, but I'm confused.

The article said ''When the Big Bang created the universe out of nothing.'' Is a paradox of the physics and contradicts the law of conservation of mass: Nothing is lost, nothing is created, everything is transformed.
This is involves a change of law of physics?
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Message 1899707 - Posted: 7 Nov 2017, 11:12:39 UTC - in response to Message 1899704.  
Last modified: 7 Nov 2017, 11:13:25 UTC

Or maybe the laws of physics didn't come into play until after the Big Bang. Without knowing the parameters and conditions before the Big Bang, we can't presume that everything we know still applies before the event.
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Message 1899768 - Posted: 8 Nov 2017, 3:34:18 UTC - in response to Message 1899707.  

Or maybe the laws of physics didn't come into play until after the Big Bang. Without knowing the parameters and conditions before the Big Bang, we can't presume that everything we know still applies before the event.



+1
ET Phone Home
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Message 1899805 - Posted: 8 Nov 2017, 7:17:37 UTC
Last modified: 8 Nov 2017, 7:19:08 UTC

Or maybe the laws of physics (As we know them today) didn't come into play until after the Big Bang. Without knowing the parameters and conditions before the Big Bang, we can't presume that everything we know still applies before the event.
Good point
+1

The distortion of space/time has been proven. If it did not the LIGO detectors would not work.
I dislike the term "space/time".

In physics, spacetime is any mathematical model that fuses the three dimensions of space and the one dimension of time into a single four dimensional continuum. Spacetime diagrams are useful in visualizing and understanding relativistic effects such as how different observers perceive where and when events occur.
We all know that time will pass differently for an observer on earth compared to someone in a spaceship travelling at near the speed of light. They predict that in extremne cases astronauts could return to earth and find everybody left behind considerably older than they are. That is known as "time dilation" as expressed the theory of Relativity.

Relativity

If you think their recent findings are a fraud you are joining the flat earth society.
Pffft grow up.
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Message 1899857 - Posted: 8 Nov 2017, 16:54:16 UTC - in response to Message 1899805.  

I dislike the term "space/time".

So what? That is the only thing the LIGO observatories are measuring.
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Message 1899886 - Posted: 8 Nov 2017, 19:24:28 UTC - in response to Message 1899805.  

I still have a hard time wrapping my head around time dilation.
The mind is a weird and mysterious place
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Message 1899892 - Posted: 8 Nov 2017, 20:14:56 UTC - in response to Message 1899886.  

I still have a hard time wrapping my head around time dilation.

Well you know it does because GPS satellites have to compensate for it in order for them to work properly.
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Message 1899900 - Posted: 8 Nov 2017, 21:07:03 UTC - in response to Message 1899892.  

I still have a hard time wrapping my head around time dilation.

Well you know it does because GPS satellites have to compensate for it in order for them to work properly.

It's expanding on that in a grand scale that I have trouble with.
The mind is a weird and mysterious place
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Message 1899901 - Posted: 8 Nov 2017, 21:13:20 UTC

If somebody from earth travels to Alpha Centauri at close to the speed of light, and then comes back at the same speed, around 10 years should have passed for the astronaut, right? But how many years have gone by on earth? ~That's where I'm confused.
The mind is a weird and mysterious place
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Message 1899906 - Posted: 8 Nov 2017, 21:26:02 UTC - in response to Message 1899901.  

No, ten years would pass on earth, the astronaut much less time. Just like time passes more slowly on the GPS satellite.
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