Next year, scientists will send messages to search for aliens

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Profile LynnProject Donor
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Message 1889677 - Posted: 14 Sep 2017, 2:44:50 UTC
Last modified: 14 Sep 2017, 2:46:16 UTC

We should be careful what we wish for.


Next year, scientists will send messages to search for aliens


For the last half-century or so, astronomers around the world have been scanning the cosmos with massive radio telescopes in hopes of finding some sign of intelligent life. This network of alien-hunters comprises the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), but despite all their efforts, the interstellar radio waves have remained quiet. One might even say too quiet.

more...

thoughts anyone?

Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligences, or METI.
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Message 1889704 - Posted: 14 Sep 2017, 8:28:44 UTC - in response to Message 1889677.  

But many SETI astronomers aren't content with only scanning the airwaves for signs of ET. Instead, they think we should also be actively reaching out to the cosmos on behalf of planet Earth.

These astronomers occupy a controversial niche within the SETI community known as Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligences, or METI. At the forefront of this group is Douglas Vakoch, president of METI International, a research group dedicated to designing and sending messages intended for extraterrestrial recipients.

Vakoch and his colleagues at METI International are fighting an uphill battle. Aside from all the technical problems that come with trying to contact aliens, many SETI astronomers think it's a bad idea.
That is a typical controversial journalistic article fron CNET. There is no worldwide agreement to go giving out signals ourselves. Anything like that would have to go through the UN.
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Message 1889715 - Posted: 14 Sep 2017, 11:21:28 UTC

And, with technology available to us we will have to wait many years for a response...
Bob Smith
Member of Seti PIPPS (Pluto is a Planet Protest Society)
Somewhere in the (un)known Universe?
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Message 1889718 - Posted: 14 Sep 2017, 11:49:27 UTC

Actually that may be a double edged sword. We likely haven't got the technology to send a meaningful message in sensible timescales out there into the cosmos. And it could well be that the other lot, if there are any, are in the same predicament. So hang around everyone, we might get a call from ET in AD 3000, reply in AD 3001, get a reply in AD 4000.

Better reverse charges with the Intergalactic Communications Corporation, could get expensive.
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Message 1889747 - Posted: 14 Sep 2017, 15:00:39 UTC

A number of METI messages have already sent out, over the years, notably from the Arecibo and Evpatoria radio astronomy observatories. These don't seem to have precipitated any dire consequences.

Some of our more powerful radars are apparently receivable at stellar distances, with equipment as good as, or only modestly more advanced than our own.

Then, too, even our less conspicuous signals could be received by extraterrestrials who really wished to do so. This could be accomplished by placing receivers at the gravitational lens foci of a star. Using an entire star as a collector of radio waves would reportedly make for almost fantastic sensitivity.
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Message 1889933 - Posted: 15 Sep 2017, 15:41:39 UTC

I'm not keen on the idea of sending out invitations to unknown recipients.
Bob DeWoody

My motto: Never do today what you can put off until tomorrow as it may not be required. This no longer applies in light of current events.
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Message 1890679 - Posted: 19 Sep 2017, 0:06:28 UTC

Well, if there is life out there, it seems inevitable to me, aside from problems with current laws of physics, that we're going to find each other someday, so a few bottles thrown in the cosmic ocean now seem harmless enough.
The mind is a weird and mysterious place
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Message 1890680 - Posted: 19 Sep 2017, 0:12:19 UTC - in response to Message 1889933.  

I'm not keen on the idea of sending out invitations to unknown recipients.


If other civilizations all felt that way then SETI is a royal waste of time and energy. I doubt that eavesdropping will prove to be fruitful unless the "I am here"
messages are beamed out into promising places in space.
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Message 1899615 - Posted: 6 Nov 2017, 22:06:41 UTC - in response to Message 1890680.  
Last modified: 6 Nov 2017, 22:17:07 UTC

I'm not keen on the idea of sending out invitations to unknown recipients.


If other civilizations all felt that way then SETI is a royal waste of time and energy. I doubt that eavesdropping will prove to be fruitful unless the "I am here"
messages are beamed out into promising places in space.

And maybe, just maybe other civilizations which can send signals into the Deep, have the ability to defend themselves, or the brains not to beam in a first place.

Without knowing for certain, I choose to believe others ARE in fact beaming straight across the universe https://youtu.be/gZ_XRTP-JbE?t=504. Otherwise, as you said, SETI would be a royal waste of time and energy. Thinking that way really kills my mojo.

So, tinfoil hats down, let them waves in! \m/
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Message 1901331 - Posted: 16 Nov 2017, 11:50:44 UTC

I'll bet $100 there is nobody there.
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Message 1901341 - Posted: 16 Nov 2017, 14:17:23 UTC

I truly believe that as an intelligent species we are not alone, if not in this galaxy then in one of the billions of others in the known universe. But I have also come to believe since this whole seti@home thing started that it is a very long shot hoping that we will ever communicate with any of the other intelligent beings out there within my lifetime and probably several more generations of humans. We just don't live long enough in the great big scheme of things. Everything is just too far apart and unless and until some genius discovers a way to bypass the speed limit known as the speed of light with both space travel and interstellar communication we will remain stuck here on our little island called earth only guessing and hoping someone else is out there. Having said that I will continue to support the seti@home project until I die or it shuts down.
Bob DeWoody

My motto: Never do today what you can put off until tomorrow as it may not be required. This no longer applies in light of current events.
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Message 1901352 - Posted: 16 Nov 2017, 15:37:04 UTC

Because I don't believe we will find anything doesn't stop me supporting Seti to try to look.
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Message 1901413 - Posted: 16 Nov 2017, 23:08:13 UTC - in response to Message 1901352.  

Update:


Scientists Have Sent Messages to Advanced Alien Civilizations—And Are Hoping for a Reply in 25 Years


Updated | A small group of scientists has unilaterally decided to send messages to any advanced alien civilization living in a star system 12.4 light years away (over 70 trillion miles). The message, which includes pieces of music, math and technology, was transmitted to the GJ273 system over three days in October and includes instructions about how they should reply to us on a day 25 years from now.
ET Phone Home
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