Has a parallel universe been discovered?

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Profile Chris SCrowdfunding Project Donor
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Message 1868402 - Posted: 20 May 2017, 15:34:34 UTC

Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is to do with quantum mechanics and nothing to do with infinity or parallel universes. The winner of next year's Kentucky Derby is uncertain, but also nothing to do with Heisenberg.

In quantum mechanics, the uncertainty principle, also known as Heisenberg's uncertainty principle or Heisenberg's indeterminacy principle, is any of a variety of mathematical inequalities asserting a fundamental limit to the precision with which certain pairs of physical properties of a particle, known as complementary variables, such as position x and momentum p, can be known.

Historically, the uncertainty principle has been confused with a somewhat similar effect in physics, called the observer effect, which notes that measurements of certain systems cannot be made without affecting the systems, that is, without changing something in a system. Heisenberg offered such an observer effect at the quantum level as a physical "explanation" of quantum uncertainty.
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Message 1868406 - Posted: 20 May 2017, 15:55:21 UTC - in response to Message 1868402.  

Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is to do with quantum mechanics and nothing to do with infinity or parallel universes. The winner of next year's Kentucky Derby is uncertain, but also nothing to do with Heisenberg.

In quantum mechanics, the uncertainty principle, also known as Heisenberg's uncertainty principle or Heisenberg's indeterminacy principle, is any of a variety of mathematical inequalities asserting a fundamental limit to the precision with which certain pairs of physical properties of a particle, known as complementary variables, such as position x and momentum p, can be known.

Historically, the uncertainty principle has been confused with a somewhat similar effect in physics, called the observer effect, which notes that measurements of certain systems cannot be made without affecting the systems, that is, without changing something in a system. Heisenberg offered such an observer effect at the quantum level as a physical "explanation" of quantum uncertainty.

What?
I'm a part of the quantum world.
So do you!
Stop your nonsense!
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Message 1868434 - Posted: 20 May 2017, 18:20:46 UTC - in response to Message 1868402.  

Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is to do with quantum mechanics and nothing to do with infinity or parallel universes.

You are dead wrong!
Infinity doesn't exist in the real world!
That's a fact.
Parallel universes perhaps.
Not a fact merely a hypothesis.
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Message 1868444 - Posted: 20 May 2017, 18:59:43 UTC

You are dead wrong!
Infinity doesn't exist in the real world!
Infinity is not a material substance that can be weighed or measured, it is a concept. And it can be represented by ∞ =1/0.
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Message 1868449 - Posted: 20 May 2017, 19:16:07 UTC - in response to Message 1868444.  

You are dead wrong!
Infinity doesn't exist in the real world!
Infinity is not a material substance that can be weighed or measured, it is a concept. And it can be represented by ∞ =1/0.

Yes.
Math can do wonders.
Even when it comes to the concept of Infinity.
I think you have read or seen Mad Max:)

Btw ∞ is not a number and can't be used in math.
Simple fact.
Or how do you prove this?
∞ =1/0
I think it's an axiom just as there are no proofs of parallel lines.
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Message 1868450 - Posted: 20 May 2017, 19:29:01 UTC

I think it's an axiom just as there are no proofs of parallel lines.

Proofs
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Message 1868452 - Posted: 20 May 2017, 19:34:52 UTC - in response to Message 1868450.  

I think it's an axiom just as there are no proofs of parallel lines.

Proofs

That's the alternate Theory, Chris:)
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Message 1868453 - Posted: 20 May 2017, 19:39:39 UTC

Btw ∞ is not a number and can't be used in math.
Simple fact.

Infinity and maths
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Message 1868476 - Posted: 20 May 2017, 21:11:04 UTC - in response to Message 1868453.  

Btw ∞ is not a number and can't be used in math.
Simple fact.

Infinity and maths

Infinity and maths get along.
Infinity and maths in the real world doesn't get along.
Read your links for heavens sake.
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Message 1868497 - Posted: 20 May 2017, 23:28:37 UTC - in response to Message 1868453.  

Btw ∞ is not a number and can't be used in math.
Simple fact.

Infinity and maths

Sigh...
Could you please answer us about rational and irrational numbers.
Especially the size between them!
https://www.khanacademy.org/math/algebra/rational-and-irrational-numbers/alg-1-irrational-numbers/v/recognizing-irrational-numbers
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Message 1868540 - Posted: 21 May 2017, 3:31:00 UTC - in response to Message 1868497.  

Infinity is used in calculating limits and is the basis for Calculus
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Message 1868542 - Posted: 21 May 2017, 3:46:46 UTC - in response to Message 1868540.  
Last modified: 21 May 2017, 3:57:33 UTC

Infinity is used in calculating limits and is the basis for Calculus

Yes. I know very well about infinity and Calculus.
It was Descartes and later Isaac Newton that created this math toolbox.
But in real life and did they explain calculating limits outside the view?
I would say no because it's only about dividing things .
Not about what objects outside looks like.
There are no such tools.
Have you been to a infinity as a German mathematician said in video that I linked before?
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x20grta_horizon-infinity-bbc_shortfilms
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Message 1868571 - Posted: 21 May 2017, 8:32:33 UTC - in response to Message 1868540.  
Last modified: 21 May 2017, 8:59:45 UTC

Infinity doesn't exist as a item that you can see or hold in your hand, and as such it has no directly measurable parameters. It is a concept. But we can assign a symbol to it and use it in mathematical equations.

When we were naughty as kids mum always said we were driving her to infinity, we always said how far away was it and did dad know the route :-))

Calculus was "invented" long before the famous controversy between Newton and Leibniz, according to this book. And later in the 17th century, European mathematicians Isaac Barrow, René Descartes, Pierre de Fermat, Blaise Pascal, John Wallis and others discussed the idea of a derivative.

History
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Message 1868572 - Posted: 21 May 2017, 9:30:44 UTC

The roots of calculus go back a long way, a very long way. Possibly about 2000 years BC, so about 4000 years ago. What these Europeans did was to pull it all together, rationalise it into "simple" algorithms and get noticed doing so.
It is interesting that many of the techniques employed by "The Ancients", such as error estimation and rounding are still employed today in computational based calculus - where one is trying to get an answer, where transfer functions are used to express "real" differential and integral functions in terms that can be calculated more easily, then you invert the transfer function to get to the final answer.

I remember one maths lecturer coming my office, looking at e bit of paper on the wall with a stack of differential equations on it. After studying them for a few seconds he asked "Why have you got Maxwell's equation of state for light on your wall?" - My answer floored him "Oh, is that what they are, last time I saw them like that was in my under graduate days, more recently (PG days) I was using the Hamiltonian transfers, so much easier to do on a pocket calculator...", the look on his face was priceless.
Bob Smith
Member of Seti PIPPS (Pluto is a Planet Protest Society)
Somewhere in the (un)known Universe?
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Message 1868575 - Posted: 21 May 2017, 10:02:12 UTC - in response to Message 1868572.  

Most of the Greeks e.g. Zeno, Plato, Pythagoras etc were about 500 BC or thereabouts, but weren't the Chinese and India at it earlier?

This infinity business is similar to Achilles and the tortoise, where in theory he can never catch it because he will always be a tiny bit away from it, the series continues ad infinitum. Oh look another way of saying for infinity!
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Message 1868577 - Posted: 21 May 2017, 10:16:37 UTC - in response to Message 1868575.  

Yes: the ancients were right on to the subject of infinite series and the essence of Calculus. Archimedes' "Method of Exhaustion" is a prime example.
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Message 1868580 - Posted: 21 May 2017, 10:21:18 UTC - in response to Message 1868575.  
Last modified: 21 May 2017, 10:21:46 UTC

Most of the Greeks e.g. Zeno, Plato, Pythagoras etc were about 500 BC or thereabouts, but weren't the Chinese and India at it earlier?
This infinity business is similar to Achilles and the tortoise, where in theory he can never catch it because he will always be a tiny bit away from it, the series continues ad infinitum. Oh look another way of saying for infinity!

I think Sumer that was the first urban civilization in the historical region of southern Mesopotamia, modern-day southern Iraq in 4500 – c. 2004 BC.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sumer
They still use base 60 in maths.
And even we reading clocks and in navigation.
Why 60?
Count your knuckles and bones on your fingers:)
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Message 1868588 - Posted: 21 May 2017, 11:17:31 UTC - in response to Message 1868577.  

Archimedes' "Method of Exhaustion" is a prime example.

It is, although not particularly used today, it paved the way for modern calculus by the ancients.

The idea originated in the late 5th century BC with Antiphon, although it is not entirely clear how well he understood it. The theory was made rigorous a few decades later by Eudoxus of Cnidus, who used it to calculate areas and volumes. It was later reinvented in China by Liu Hui in the 3rd century AD in order to find the area of a circle.

The method of exhaustion is seen as a precursor to the methods of calculus. The development of analytical geometry and rigorous integral calculus in the 17th-19th centuries subsumed the method of exhaustion so that it is no longer explicitly used to solve problems. An important alternative approach was Cavalieri's principle, also termed the "method of indivisibles", which eventually evolved into the infinitesimal calculus of Roberval, Torricelli, Wallis, Leibniz, and others.
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Message 1868592 - Posted: 21 May 2017, 11:52:48 UTC - in response to Message 1868588.  
Last modified: 21 May 2017, 12:16:32 UTC

I wonder if calculus works in a parallel universe.
Most likely but 11 dimensions?
Mind gobbling!
I have to ask Mad Max and Laura about this...
https://twitter.com/tegmark
https://vimeo.com/75833771

BTW Mad Max is now 50 years old:)
http://news.mit.edu/2017/king-carl-xvi-gustaf-sweden-visits-mit-0508
Max Tegmark, a professor of physics at MIT who was born in Stockholm, moderated the discussions, gave an introduction in Swedish to the delegation, and provided a few remarks of his own about artificial intelligence.
“We don’t want to make any mistakes,” Tegmark said. “We want to get it right.” Tegmark’s concerns stem from the idea, he added, that “We want to be proactive, not reactive,” about the impact of technology on society.
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Message 1868597 - Posted: 21 May 2017, 12:33:26 UTC - in response to Message 1868575.  
Last modified: 22 May 2017, 21:11:07 UTC

This infinity business is similar to Achilles and the tortoise, where in theory he can never catch it because he will always be a tiny bit away from it, the series continues ad infinitum. Oh look another way of saying for infinity!


Zeno's paradox... the intellectual leap the ancient Greeks don't seem to have universally made is that an infinite series can have a finite sum... ie:



Archimedes was getting there, but the Romans... er... intervened. Also Aristotle although a philosopher understood it. They were very close to calculus, but lacked the algebraic framework and notation to support it.

Side note: One of the niftiest and most counterintuitive results of this is that the "Harmonic Series"...



... diverges to infinity. It doesn't seem possible because after a few terms it grows so slowly and this rate falls off so fast.... it takes 144 iterations to get to 6, but to get to 10 takes 12,367, and to 100 takes over 1043! Yet the proof is there in the article (Comparison Test proof) and quite easily understandable.

Edit: one of the integral equations shown has ∞ as both the upper range of the integral and the result, showing its use in mathematics.
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