Gaia

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Message 1817141 - Posted: 14 Sep 2016, 16:20:28 UTC

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Message 1817203 - Posted: 14 Sep 2016, 22:49:01 UTC - in response to Message 1817141.  

Exciting!
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Message 1817205 - Posted: 14 Sep 2016, 22:58:42 UTC - in response to Message 1817141.  

I don't understand this statement about "What does Gaia see?" I thought our solar system was on the outskirts. How could the sun do this?:

The Sun moves around the centre of the Milky Way at a speed of about 220km/second (10,000,000,000 miles/hour)

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Message 1817208 - Posted: 14 Sep 2016, 23:10:39 UTC - in response to Message 1817205.  

I don't understand this statement about "What does Gaia see?" I thought our solar system was on the outskirts. How could the sun do this?:

[quote]The Sun moves around the centre of the Milky Way at a speed of about 220km/second (10,000,000,000 miles/hour)
[/quote

ESA’s Gaia satellite


more info:


Gaia's first galaxy map


The astronomy world is abuzz today because of ESA's announcement of the first release of data from the Gaia mission. Gaia is a five-year mission that will eventually measure the positions and motions of billions of stars; this first data release includes positions for 1.1 billion of them, and proper motions for 2 million. The map below does not show all 1.1 billion stars; rather it's a map of the density of stars that Gaia has measured so far, with brighter areas corresponding to more stars.
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Message 1817211 - Posted: 14 Sep 2016, 23:23:50 UTC - in response to Message 1817208.  

I don't understand this statement about "What does Gaia see?" I thought our solar system was on the outskirts. How could the sun do this?:

[quote]The Sun moves around the centre of the Milky Way at a speed of about 220km/second (10,000,000,000 miles/hour)
[/quote

ESA’s Gaia satellite


more info:


Gaia's first galaxy map


The astronomy world is abuzz today because of ESA's announcement of the first release of data from the Gaia mission. Gaia is a five-year mission that will eventually measure the positions and motions of billions of stars; this first data release includes positions for 1.1 billion of them, and proper motions for 2 million. The map below does not show all 1.1 billion stars; rather it's a map of the density of stars that Gaia has measured so far, with brighter areas corresponding to more stars.


Yes, but that still doesn't really answer my question.
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Message 1817250 - Posted: 15 Sep 2016, 1:50:47 UTC - in response to Message 1817211.  
Last modified: 15 Sep 2016, 1:54:47 UTC




As the Earth goes around the Sun, relatively nearby stars appear to move against the "fixed" stars that are even further away
Because we know the Sun-Earth distance, we can use the parallax angle to work out the distance to the target star
But such angles are very small - less than one arcsecond for the nearest stars, or 0.05% of the full Moon's diameter
Gaia will make repeat observations to reduce measurement errors down to seven micro-arcseconds for the very brightest stars
Parallaxes are used to anchor other, more indirect techniques on the 'ladder' deployed to measure the most far-flung distances
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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Gaia


 
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