AT&T uses low-power antennas to prevent cellular interference with (Greenbank) telescope

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Message 1773605 - Posted: 24 Mar 2016, 2:57:39 UTC

AT&T uses ow-power antennas to prevent cellular interference with telescope

Software automatically adjusts smartphones to low-power mode at Snowshoe ski resort in West Virginia

AT&T engineered an unusual low-power antenna system inside a radio quiet zone at a snow resort in rural West Virginia, giving thousands of daily smartphone users network access for the first time.

Work on the multimillion-dollar solution started in 2013 and took months of testing with engineers at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and staff at Snowshoe Mountain Ski Resort.

The custom-designed Distributed Antenna System (DAS) network went operational in 2015 and worked well for skiers over the past winter, according to Steven Little, senior radio access network engineer at AT&T.

The low-power approach was vital to minimize possible harmful electromagnetic interference with the Green Bank Radio Telescope, a steerable telescope spanning 2.3 acres, that is part of the radio observatory.


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Message 1773634 - Posted: 24 Mar 2016, 5:27:34 UTC

Ain't that nice of them.
Bob DeWoody

My motto: Never do today what you can put off until tomorrow as it may not be required. This no longer applies in light of current events.
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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : AT&T uses low-power antennas to prevent cellular interference with (Greenbank) telescope


 
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