SpaceX finally lands Falcon 9

Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : SpaceX finally lands Falcon 9
Message board moderation

To post messages, you must log in.

1 · 2 · Next

AuthorMessage
KLiKProject Donor
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 31 Mar 14
Posts: 1289
Credit: 9,105,690
RAC: 17,606
Croatia
Message 1751061 - Posted: 22 Dec 2015, 11:27:50 UTC
Last modified: 22 Dec 2015, 11:28:09 UTC

ID: 1751061 · Report as offensive
Profile Chris SCrowdfunding Project Donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 40048
Credit: 34,852,227
RAC: 64,578
United Kingdom
Message 1751063 - Posted: 22 Dec 2015, 11:30:53 UTC

ID: 1751063 · Report as offensive
Profile Julie
Volunteer moderator
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 28 Oct 09
Posts: 33496
Credit: 12,354,995
RAC: 10,679
Belgium
Message 1751091 - Posted: 22 Dec 2015, 14:32:35 UTC

ID: 1751091 · Report as offensive
Profile Chris SCrowdfunding Project Donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 40048
Credit: 34,852,227
RAC: 64,578
United Kingdom
Message 1751097 - Posted: 22 Dec 2015, 14:46:12 UTC

They did well, and somebody had to do it one day.
ID: 1751097 · Report as offensive
Profile Bob DeWoody
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 9 May 10
Posts: 2848
Credit: 1,215,344
RAC: 206
United States
Message 1751100 - Posted: 22 Dec 2015, 14:58:31 UTC

I had my doubts but they deserve everyone's applause. I would assume that means they are capable of sending a much larger payload into orbit if a return of the booster is sacrificed.
Bob DeWoody

My motto: Never do today what you can put off until tomorrow as it may not be required. This no longer applies in light of current events.
ID: 1751100 · Report as offensive
Profile LynnProject Donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 20 Nov 00
Posts: 11831
Credit: 31,861,758
RAC: 32,075
United States
Message 1751150 - Posted: 23 Dec 2015, 0:17:49 UTC - in response to Message 1751100.  
Last modified: 23 Dec 2015, 0:23:07 UTC

Yeah! For Space X!
ET Phone Home
ID: 1751150 · Report as offensive
Profile Chris SCrowdfunding Project Donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 40048
Credit: 34,852,227
RAC: 64,578
United Kingdom
Message 1751210 - Posted: 23 Dec 2015, 5:50:54 UTC

Vertical landings with spaceships were commonplace in 1950's scifi :-)

Just took us 65 years to do it for real!
ID: 1751210 · Report as offensive
Profile tullioProject Donor
Volunteer moderator
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 9 Apr 04
Posts: 6297
Credit: 1,682,501
RAC: 1,733
Italy
Message 1751223 - Posted: 23 Dec 2015, 7:17:16 UTC - in response to Message 1751210.  

In 1969 the Apollo LEM landed on the Moon and restarted. Confront it with the picture of a landed rocket in Willy Ley's "Rockets, missiles and space travel".
Tullio
ID: 1751223 · Report as offensive
Profile Chris SCrowdfunding Project Donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 40048
Credit: 34,852,227
RAC: 64,578
United Kingdom
Message 1751229 - Posted: 23 Dec 2015, 7:49:56 UTC
Last modified: 23 Dec 2015, 7:51:06 UTC

Yes, the Apollo LEM did indeed land vertically upon the moon, and took off again. But firstly they did it back to front to space X, and the descent stage was left behind. Secondly they did it in minimal gravity and no atmosphere. This not to decry either achievement, but to point out that you can't really compare like for like.

The early days of the space program saw returning modules parachute down into the ocean with dozens of ships in attendance. This was obviously impractical for a commercial operation, and spacecraft had to be developed that could take off and land vertically at space ports, with either freight or passengers.

Thunderbirds 1 & 3 were good approximations of what was needed. The Andersons still amaze me with their visionary vehicles. Why do we still use C130 Hercules planes when we have Harrier STOVL technology to produce Thunderbird 2 designs?
ID: 1751229 · Report as offensive
KLiKProject Donor
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 31 Mar 14
Posts: 1289
Credit: 9,105,690
RAC: 17,606
Croatia
Message 1751233 - Posted: 23 Dec 2015, 8:43:59 UTC - in response to Message 1751223.  

In 1969 the Apollo LEM landed on the Moon and restarted. Confront it with the picture of a landed rocket in Willy Ley's "Rockets, missiles and space travel".
Tullio

yeah, & they did it with:
"The computer had 2048 words of erasable magnetic core memory and 36 kilowords of read-only core rope memory. Both had cycle times of 11.72 micro-seconds. The memory word length was 16 bits: 15 bits of data and one odd-parity bit. The CPU-internal 16-bit word format was 14 bits of data, one overflow bit, and one sign bit (ones' complement representation)."
:D

Now, that's amazing!

non-profit org. Play4Life in Zagreb, Croatia, EU
ID: 1751233 · Report as offensive
Profile tullioProject Donor
Volunteer moderator
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 9 Apr 04
Posts: 6297
Credit: 1,682,501
RAC: 1,733
Italy
Message 1751241 - Posted: 23 Dec 2015, 9:34:55 UTC - in response to Message 1751233.  

It was a magnificent blend of technology and human bravery. Neil Armstrong risked death on a LEM module, escaping by parachute. Brave men, including those of Apollo 13.
Tullio
ID: 1751241 · Report as offensive
Profile Bob DeWoody
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 9 May 10
Posts: 2848
Credit: 1,215,344
RAC: 206
United States
Message 1751297 - Posted: 23 Dec 2015, 15:47:19 UTC

Great job by SpaceX, next hurdle to bring back a vehicle from orbit and land it vertically. The Falcon 9 booster wasn't required to reach orbital velocity, that was the job of the second stage rocket. It's going to be a lot harder to decelerate from 17,000 mph and land on a pad vertically with no payload, let alone with a crew on board.
Bob DeWoody

My motto: Never do today what you can put off until tomorrow as it may not be required. This no longer applies in light of current events.
ID: 1751297 · Report as offensive
KLiKProject Donor
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 31 Mar 14
Posts: 1289
Credit: 9,105,690
RAC: 17,606
Croatia
Message 1751480 - Posted: 24 Dec 2015, 10:51:46 UTC - in response to Message 1751297.  

Great job by SpaceX, next hurdle to bring back a vehicle from orbit and land it vertically. The Falcon 9 booster wasn't required to reach orbital velocity, that was the job of the second stage rocket. It's going to be a lot harder to decelerate from 17,000 mph and land on a pad vertically with no payload, let alone with a crew on board.

I wouldn't risk it with a crew...we only have few dozen of astronauts!

& so many rockets, as we can build...
;)

non-profit org. Play4Life in Zagreb, Croatia, EU
ID: 1751480 · Report as offensive
Profile JakeTheDog
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 3 Nov 13
Posts: 138
Credit: 2,302,599
RAC: 310
United States
Message 1752333 - Posted: 30 Dec 2015, 2:08:01 UTC

I wonder how they will land the 2nd stage from a stable orbit. My guess is it would have to 3 burns, like the 1st stage, except the 1st burn isn't a boost-back, but on the opposite side of the orbit to bring down the periapsis into the atmosphere. But how would the 2nd stage survive reentry? Maybe a movable heat shield that covers the bottom of the stage between the 1st and 2nd burn? Maybe the 2nd stage can't be reused
ID: 1752333 · Report as offensive
Profile Bob DeWoody
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 9 May 10
Posts: 2848
Credit: 1,215,344
RAC: 206
United States
Message 1752335 - Posted: 30 Dec 2015, 2:28:48 UTC

I don't think they have plans to reuse the second stage.
Bob DeWoody

My motto: Never do today what you can put off until tomorrow as it may not be required. This no longer applies in light of current events.
ID: 1752335 · Report as offensive
Profile Gary CharpentierCrowdfunding Project Donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 25 Dec 00
Posts: 21109
Credit: 30,592,471
RAC: 22,329
United States
Message 1752366 - Posted: 30 Dec 2015, 6:34:25 UTC - in response to Message 1752333.  

I wonder how they will land the 2nd stage from a stable orbit. My guess is it would have to 3 burns, like the 1st stage, except the 1st burn isn't a boost-back, but on the opposite side of the orbit to bring down the periapsis into the atmosphere. But how would the 2nd stage survive reentry? Maybe a movable heat shield that covers the bottom of the stage between the 1st and 2nd burn? Maybe the 2nd stage can't be reused

No heat shield, would burn up, actually will burn up, most space flights aren't allowed to add much debris to earth orbit any more.
ID: 1752366 · Report as offensive
Dave Hamann

Send message
Joined: 1 Jan 16
Posts: 17
Credit: 429
RAC: 0
United Kingdom
Message 1753121 - Posted: 2 Jan 2016, 7:14:45 UTC

The landing was one of the best things I would remember 2015 for.
The proud owner of IGCSE World.
ID: 1753121 · Report as offensive
Profile tullioProject Donor
Volunteer moderator
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 9 Apr 04
Posts: 6297
Credit: 1,682,501
RAC: 1,733
Italy
Message 1756863 - Posted: 16 Jan 2016, 14:37:45 UTC
Last modified: 16 Jan 2016, 15:00:03 UTC

The meteo satellite Jason 3, a joint cooperation between NASA and France's CNES, is scheduled to be launched Sunday on a Falcon 9 rocket which will attempt a landing at sea of its first stage. This Falcon 9 is an earlier version of the recently launched Falcon 9 which landed on land, and the attempt to land at sea is also an experiment. Its main mission is to place in orbit Jason 3, which will monitor the oceans and their variation in height for three years. The launch will be at Vandenberg USAF base in California and will be beamed on NASA TV.
Tullio
SpaceX of Hawthorne,California, has also been awarded a contract with NASA for building a Space Resupply Mission vehicle to ferry materials to the ISS, together with Orbital ATK of Dulles, Virginia, and Sierra Nevada Corporation of Sparks, Nevada. It looks like President Obama was right when he opened space to private firms.
ID: 1756863 · Report as offensive
Profile CarlosProject Donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 9 Jun 99
Posts: 19135
Credit: 37,261,536
RAC: 34,919
United States
Message 1757014 - Posted: 17 Jan 2016, 3:44:17 UTC
Last modified: 17 Jan 2016, 3:45:41 UTC

Reminder Jason Webcast online Sun, Jan 17 2016 10:42 AM PST — Sun, Jan 17 2016 12:00 PM PST

Webcast Link Here.
ID: 1757014 · Report as offensive
Profile Gary CharpentierCrowdfunding Project Donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 25 Dec 00
Posts: 21109
Credit: 30,592,471
RAC: 22,329
United States
Message 1757109 - Posted: 17 Jan 2016, 15:55:15 UTC

I believe live coverage starts in a couple minutes here 11 AM EST
https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html
ID: 1757109 · Report as offensive
1 · 2 · Next

Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : SpaceX finally lands Falcon 9


 
©2017 University of California
 
SETI@home and Astropulse are funded by grants from the National Science Foundation, NASA, and donations from SETI@home volunteers. AstroPulse is funded in part by the NSF through grant AST-0307956.