Enceladus

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Profile Chris SCrowdfunding Project Donor
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Message 1748328 - Posted: 11 Dec 2015, 6:07:38 UTC
Last modified: 11 Dec 2015, 6:07:56 UTC

"Indications are..." etc etc. But worth a second visit maybe.

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Message 1748329 - Posted: 11 Dec 2015, 6:16:03 UTC

Who has the money to go back again so soon? Don't the planets need to be in a certain alignment unless you have a lot of fuel to burn.
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Message 1748367 - Posted: 11 Dec 2015, 9:09:33 UTC

maybe something similar to Europa mission can be organized?! ;)

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Message 1748382 - Posted: 11 Dec 2015, 10:47:02 UTC
Last modified: 11 Dec 2015, 10:51:49 UTC

Who has the money to go back again so soon? Don't the planets need to be in a certain alignment unless you have a lot of fuel to burn.

There are various launch windows every so often for various space craft leaving earth. Cassini launched in 1997 and has taken 18 years to get to where it is. The total cost of this scientific exploration mission is US $3.26 billion. It has had extra funding since being renamed the Cassini Solstice Mission in 2010.

So no, we won't be going back any time soon. This news is more to justify the cost and time of the current mission. That it not to decry it, but to be realistic. And hey, hack pseudo sci fi journalists have to earn a crust at Christmas to feed their families!
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Message 1748924 - Posted: 13 Dec 2015, 16:17:22 UTC - in response to Message 1748382.  

Who has the money to go back again so soon? Don't the planets need to be in a certain alignment unless you have a lot of fuel to burn.

There are various launch windows every so often for various space craft leaving earth. Cassini launched in 1997 and has taken 18 years to get to where it is. The total cost of this scientific exploration mission is US $3.26 billion. It has had extra funding since being renamed the Cassini Solstice Mission in 2010.

So no, we won't be going back any time soon. This news is more to justify the cost and time of the current mission. That it not to decry it, but to be realistic. And hey, hack pseudo sci fi journalists have to earn a crust at Christmas to feed their families!

the idea of "how much does it cost" in Space exploration is insignificant...'cause if Spanish (& any other king & queens) still asked that question, don't know if we ever got out of Europe!

certainly America was too far & unknown to us...
;)

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Message 1748933 - Posted: 13 Dec 2015, 16:58:49 UTC
Last modified: 13 Dec 2015, 17:14:33 UTC

We might want to consider Europa for a similar life-detecting mission. It's half the distance to Enceladus, with about four times the solar energy for powering a probe. Europa reportedly has water plumes like Enceladus, which are also believed to connect with an ocean, under the icy crust.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europa_(moon)
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Message 1748951 - Posted: 13 Dec 2015, 18:29:25 UTC - in response to Message 1748924.  

the idea of "how much does it cost" in Space exploration is insignificant...'cause if Spanish (& any other king & queens) still asked that question, don't know if we ever got out of Europe!
certainly America was too far & unknown to us...
;)

You forgot the Vikings:)
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Message 1748986 - Posted: 13 Dec 2015, 20:26:48 UTC - in response to Message 1748951.  

the idea of "how much does it cost" in Space exploration is insignificant...'cause if Spanish (& any other king & queens) still asked that question, don't know if we ever got out of Europe!
certainly America was too far & unknown to us...
;)

You forgot the Vikings:)

In exploring the Vikings were analogous to the private enterprise of today, but regarding the topic at hand that raises an interesting question: It's one thing to be doing low-Earth-orbit projects or even asteroid mining - I'm not sure I'd be comfortable with a private company drilling holes in Enceladus or Europa or anywhere else as part of an active hands-on search for life on our behalf.
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Message 1749192 - Posted: 14 Dec 2015, 14:55:43 UTC - in response to Message 1748986.  

the idea of "how much does it cost" in Space exploration is insignificant...'cause if Spanish (& any other king & queens) still asked that question, don't know if we ever got out of Europe!
certainly America was too far & unknown to us...
;)

You forgot the Vikings:)

In exploring the Vikings were analogous to the private enterprise of today, but regarding the topic at hand that raises an interesting question: It's one thing to be doing low-Earth-orbit projects or even asteroid mining - I'm not sure I'd be comfortable with a private company drilling holes in Enceladus or Europa or anywhere else as part of an active hands-on search for life on our behalf.

Patents baby, Patents!
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Message 1749203 - Posted: 14 Dec 2015, 15:28:19 UTC

One of the problems we are finding with Mars, is that now we know there has been running water on the surface, the rover isn't aloud to get any where near it, in case it brought some microbe(s) from earth. Even though decontamination was stringent, the slightest contamination could continue for thousands of years, and start a whole new evolutionary tree. At best, it may disguise any native life, and cloud the science. I would guess that any other exploration would have the same problem.

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Message 1749208 - Posted: 14 Dec 2015, 16:24:45 UTC - in response to Message 1749203.  

One of the problems we are finding with Mars, is that now we know there has been running water on the surface, the rover isn't aloud to get any where near it, in case it brought some microbe(s) from earth. Even though decontamination was stringent, the slightest contamination could continue for thousands of years, and start a whole new evolutionary tree. At best, it may disguise any native life, and cloud the science. I would guess that any other exploration would have the same problem.

Steve

I suspect until we are able to build the craft entirely on the surface of the moon, in the hard vacuum, robotically, we won't be able to have some assurance it isn't contaminated. Extremophiles seem to be everywhere.
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Message 1749214 - Posted: 14 Dec 2015, 16:54:51 UTC - in response to Message 1749208.  

One of the problems we are finding with Mars, is that now we know there has been running water on the surface, the rover isn't aloud to get any where near it, in case it brought some microbe(s) from earth. Even though decontamination was stringent, the slightest contamination could continue for thousands of years, and start a whole new evolutionary tree. At best, it may disguise any native life, and cloud the science. I would guess that any other exploration would have the same problem.

Steve

I suspect until we are able to build the craft entirely on the surface of the moon, in the hard vacuum, robotically, we won't be able to have some assurance it isn't contaminated. Extremophiles seem to be everywhere.


I don't really understand the fastidiousness about "perfection" with the robot cleanliness if plans are being made to send people to Mars.
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Message 1749215 - Posted: 14 Dec 2015, 17:00:31 UTC - in response to Message 1749214.  

One of the problems we are finding with Mars, is that now we know there has been running water on the surface, the rover isn't aloud to get any where near it, in case it brought some microbe(s) from earth. Even though decontamination was stringent, the slightest contamination could continue for thousands of years, and start a whole new evolutionary tree. At best, it may disguise any native life, and cloud the science. I would guess that any other exploration would have the same problem.

Steve

I suspect until we are able to build the craft entirely on the surface of the moon, in the hard vacuum, robotically, we won't be able to have some assurance it isn't contaminated. Extremophiles seem to be everywhere.


I don't really understand the fastidiousness about "perfection" with the robot cleanliness if plans are being made to send people to Mars.

I don't either, but perhaps they will come up with a method to test cleanly, before we do contaminate things. I can just imagine the first person to throw a cigarette butt out on the surface of mars.

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Message 1749373 - Posted: 15 Dec 2015, 3:38:28 UTC

I brought this up before. If the existence of life is established on Mars there is a good chance that we won't go there in person.
Bob DeWoody

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Message 1749452 - Posted: 15 Dec 2015, 13:20:46 UTC - in response to Message 1748951.  
Last modified: 15 Dec 2015, 13:21:22 UTC

the idea of "how much does it cost" in Space exploration is insignificant...'cause if Spanish (& any other king & queens) still asked that question, don't know if we ever got out of Europe!
certainly America was too far & unknown to us...
;)

You forgot the Vikings:)

that's another type...when you discover sthg by mistake! ;)

so Vikings were scientists, if they employ that kind of principles! :D

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Message 1749457 - Posted: 15 Dec 2015, 13:33:20 UTC - in response to Message 1749373.  

I brought this up before. If the existence of life is established on Mars there is a good chance that we won't go there in person.



That's a good point, but how do you feel about that? I think we should go ahead and go, regardless.
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Message 1749511 - Posted: 15 Dec 2015, 22:22:29 UTC - in response to Message 1749373.  

I brought this up before. If the existence of life is established on Mars there is a good chance that we won't go there in person.

I agree...

we should send more drones there...& not send them to war, but to frontier! ;)

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Message 1749521 - Posted: 15 Dec 2015, 23:10:53 UTC - in response to Message 1749452.  
Last modified: 15 Dec 2015, 23:12:14 UTC

the idea of "how much does it cost" in Space exploration is insignificant...'cause if Spanish (& any other king & queens) still asked that question, don't know if we ever got out of Europe!
certainly America was too far & unknown to us...
;)

You forgot the Vikings:)

that's another type...when you discover sthg by mistake! ;)

so Vikings were scientists, if they employ that kind of principles! :D

Well. Here is an another accidental discovery that also earned the Nobel Prize.
Cosmic microwave background, CMB.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_microwave_background
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Message 1749527 - Posted: 15 Dec 2015, 23:38:36 UTC - in response to Message 1749457.  

I brought this up before. If the existence of life is established on Mars there is a good chance that we won't go there in person.



That's a good point, but how do you feel about that? I think we should go ahead and go, regardless.

I think it shouldn't make any difference unless they are walking and talking and carrying weapons.

Idealism can be carried to an extreme and it is very unlikely that any native organisms on Mar or anywhere else in the solar system would ever evolve to become sentient beings.
Bob DeWoody

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Message 1749587 - Posted: 16 Dec 2015, 5:39:06 UTC

Idealism can be carried to an extreme and it is very unlikely that any native organisms on Mar or anywhere else in the solar system would ever evolve to become sentient beings.

But wasn't life on earth supposed to have developed from primordial slime?
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