Space Junk

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Message 1701427 - Posted: 14 Jul 2015, 13:45:33 UTC

Finally. new programming on the science channel. Last night was a program about space junk and how we are on the brink of creating a vast no fly zone in orbit around the earth. It wasn't considered too bad until the Chinese intercepted and destroyed one of their own satellites in a demonstration of their capabilities in space. The count of uncontrolled objects went up by 40% after that stupid demonstration. Some experts are claiming that the tipping point is only a decade or two away if nothing is done and at that point most, if not all, of the worlds active satellites may be knocked out.
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Message 1701428 - Posted: 14 Jul 2015, 13:52:05 UTC

At least something is in the works.

http://www.technewsworld.com/story/82248.html

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Message 1701600 - Posted: 15 Jul 2015, 5:03:49 UTC

I kind of thought orbital decay would take care of the junk eventually, or does that take too long?
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Message 1701651 - Posted: 15 Jul 2015, 8:35:30 UTC

Ones that make a mess (garbage), should clean up after!
;)

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Message 1701695 - Posted: 15 Jul 2015, 11:54:13 UTC - in response to Message 1701600.  

I kind of thought orbital decay would take care of the junk eventually, or does that take too long?

It's the tiny stuff too small to track that they are currently concerned about and most of that stuff could stay in orbit for a very long time.
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Message 1701705 - Posted: 15 Jul 2015, 12:52:16 UTC - in response to Message 1701695.  

I kind of thought orbital decay would take care of the junk eventually, or does that take too long?

It's the tiny stuff too small to track that they are currently concerned about and most of that stuff could stay in orbit for a very long time.


Ah, I see. Well, I've heard a bit about cubesats getting popular, and those things are going to contribute to the problem, I imagine.
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Message 1702127 - Posted: 16 Jul 2015, 12:13:06 UTC - in response to Message 1701705.  

I kind of thought orbital decay would take care of the junk eventually, or does that take too long?

It's the tiny stuff too small to track that they are currently concerned about and most of that stuff could stay in orbit for a very long time.


Ah, I see. Well, I've heard a bit about cubesats getting popular, and those things are going to contribute to the problem, I imagine.

Not exactly...'cause those r "tracked sats"!

Only if they wonder off track & out of service...do they become a space junk! ;)

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Message 1702271 - Posted: 16 Jul 2015, 18:54:08 UTC

From watching the program on the Science Channel it appears to me that the most dangerous stuff is that which is in polar orbits. Those objects cross the path of everything in west to east orbits.
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Message 1702275 - Posted: 16 Jul 2015, 19:17:22 UTC - in response to Message 1702271.  

Yes, but they are much higher as a rule.
Tullio
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Message 1702413 - Posted: 17 Jul 2015, 6:14:43 UTC

According to Wiki the typical polar orbit is 1,000km or 621 miles.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polar_orbit
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Message 1702418 - Posted: 17 Jul 2015, 6:33:16 UTC - in response to Message 1702413.  
Last modified: 17 Jul 2015, 7:02:17 UTC

This is higher than ISS in Low Earth Orbit. But geostationary satellites are at 36000 km at fixed point in space relative to the Earth, which is rotating.
Tullio
I've just read on theregister.co.uk about an alarm on the ISS which caused the 3 men crew to enter a Soyuz spacecraft to avoid a possible hit with debris of a Russian weather satellite launched in 1979. ISS seems to have survived with no damage. I think it was yesterday.
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Message 1702428 - Posted: 17 Jul 2015, 7:13:50 UTC - in response to Message 1702418.  

This is higher than ISS in Low Earth Orbit. But geostationary satellites are at 36000 km at fixed point in space relative to the Earth, which is rotating.
Tullio
I've just read on theregister.co.uk about an alarm on the ISS which caused the 3 men crew to enter a Soyuz spacecraft to avoid a possible hit with debris of a Russian weather satellite launched in 1979. ISS seems to have survived with no damage. I think it was yesterday.

They should really put a laser canon on ISS... ;)

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Message 1702460 - Posted: 17 Jul 2015, 9:47:13 UTC

I always understood that they had the ability to detect "incoming" and boost the orbit slightly in time to miss it?
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Message 1702474 - Posted: 17 Jul 2015, 10:53:33 UTC - in response to Message 1702460.  

Probably ISS needs a Progress cargo craft with sufficient fuel attached to it to fire its engines in order to modify the ISS orbit. I remember they did this maneuver before starting the reentry of Samantha and her companions by a Soyuz craft.
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Message 1702480 - Posted: 17 Jul 2015, 11:27:44 UTC

Probably ISS needs a Progress cargo craft with sufficient fuel attached to it to fire its engines in order to modify the ISS orbit.

The ISS maintains an orbit with an altitude of between 330 and 435 km (205 and 270 mi) by means of reboost manoeuvres using the engines of the Zvezda module or visiting spacecraft.

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Message 1702484 - Posted: 17 Jul 2015, 12:02:09 UTC - in response to Message 1702474.  
Last modified: 17 Jul 2015, 12:12:23 UTC

Probably ISS needs a Progress cargo craft with sufficient fuel attached to it to fire its engines in order to modify the ISS orbit. I remember they did this maneuver before starting the reentry of Samantha and her companions by a Soyuz craft.
Tullio

soon will ISS get a EM drive: http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2015/04/evaluating-nasas-futuristic-em-drive/
;)

Finally. new programming on the science channel. Last night was a program about space junk and how we are on the brink of creating a vast no fly zone in orbit around the earth. It wasn't considered too bad until the Chinese intercepted and destroyed one of their own satellites in a demonstration of their capabilities in space. The count of uncontrolled objects went up by 40% after that stupid demonstration. Some experts are claiming that the tipping point is only a decade or two away if nothing is done and at that point most, if not all, of the worlds active satellites may be knocked out.

if u ask me, a funny idea came to me:
put a satellite with a paint ball gun in orbit...which has a balls filled with glue...& shoots @ debris from higher altitude, to shoot on downward on debris!
upon emptying a cartage of "glue balls" - burn it in atmosphere...& send another one!
should work... ;)

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Message 1702495 - Posted: 17 Jul 2015, 12:56:28 UTC

According to the program about space junk the ISS has it's own maneuvering thrusters but it takes more than a day to do the programming for a coordinated burn. Some objects, due to other collisions change their track and the warning system doesn't always have time to predict a possible collision.

Small pieces about the size of a bb can't be tracked but still pack the energy of a speeding 50 cal machine gun round. One scientist predicted it's only a matter of time until a spacewalking astro/cosmo naut gets hit by one of those objects and he or she may not survive long enough to get to one of the airlocks.

All it is going to take is one more collision of two normal sized satellites after which it may be impossible to prevent a chain reaction that will disable a significant number of important satellites. Don't cut you land line yet.
Bob DeWoody

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Message 1702497 - Posted: 17 Jul 2015, 13:00:54 UTC

An ARIANE 5 rocket has put in a transition orbit a meteorological ESA satellite which in ten days will be put in a geostationary orbit at 36000 km and become Meteosat 11, well above the ISS.
Tullio
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Message 1702501 - Posted: 17 Jul 2015, 13:29:53 UTC

if u ask me, a funny idea came to me:

No comment needed :-)
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Message 1702509 - Posted: 17 Jul 2015, 14:27:21 UTC - in response to Message 1702495.  

According to the program about space junk the ISS has it's own maneuvering thrusters but it takes more than a day to do the programming for a coordinated burn. Some objects, due to other collisions change their track and the warning system doesn't always have time to predict a possible collision.

Small pieces about the size of a bb can't be tracked but still pack the energy of a speeding 50 cal machine gun round. One scientist predicted it's only a matter of time until a spacewalking astro/cosmo naut gets hit by one of those objects and he or she may not survive long enough to get to one of the airlocks.

All it is going to take is one more collision of two normal sized satellites after which it may be impossible to prevent a chain reaction that will disable a significant number of important satellites. Don't cut you land line yet.

u can't survive that...or it's pretty improbable!

why?
vacuum would such out your blood like a spider of a bug...u would die sooner than a cut on arteria femoralis!
;)

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