What does loss of net neutrality mean for volunteer computing?

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Profile Geoff Pullinger Project Donor
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Message 1539797 - Posted: 11 Jul 2014, 14:07:23 UTC - in response to Message 1539270.  

Survival of the fittest is an idea also used by famous eugenicists like the Nazis. The salient feature of human evolution has been altruism and cooperation. Without it we would not be here. There is nothing wrong with capitalism, but it does lead to oligarchy and complete and overwhelming monopoly by corporations who then defend themselves by touting this "survival" stuff. Oligarchy and monopoly are the enemies of capitalism and the leaders of these monopolies will tend to form a crony-capitalist state. In a crony-capitalist state only cronies do business - everybody else sits out. Survival of the fittest should apply to products and not corporations. Corporations see it the other way, of course. In the 1970s better cars started to be imported from Japan to the US. Did US auto makers then start to produce a better product? No, they lobbied the government for import tariffs.
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Message 1539843 - Posted: 11 Jul 2014, 16:04:01 UTC

How does this affect me in the United Kingdom?
I can't post to the FCC site because I am outside the US, but surely this affects the world not just the US?
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Profile Frank Hensley Project Donor
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Message 1539942 - Posted: 11 Jul 2014, 20:14:47 UTC

My submission: ECFS Filing Receipt - Confirmation number: 2014711415228

I hope this helps!

The proposal to remove Net Neutrality on the internet in favor of a multi-layered system flawed in many ways. It would: 1. create a system that inhibits technical innovation by allowing ISPs to choose which technologies their customers can or should access. 2. create a system that protects current companies while penalizing any start-ups which have been the life blood of the internet. 3. limit access of non-profit organizations that cannot afford "higher-speed or quality lines" fees. 4. penalize media companies that do not directly own cable or satellite access to consumers. 5. enable a system of political "favors" and lobbying with bags of "special interest" funds. The Internet has grown because ISPs have been "common carriers." Our current system only breaks down when ISPs get greedy and are not satisfied with just making millions of dollars in profits each year. Unrestricted greed hurts the low-income families who really need access. When the FCC declares that the ISPs are "Common Carriers" and hold them to that status, our Nation will prosper and grow because the FCC made not only a good choice, they made a choice that is best for all Americans!
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Message 1539956 - Posted: 11 Jul 2014, 20:33:39 UTC - in response to Message 1539148.  

How about CA90210? Or the one for the White House!
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Profile Christopher Robert Evans
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Message 1540101 - Posted: 12 Jul 2014, 0:32:37 UTC - in response to Message 1538832.  
Last modified: 12 Jul 2014, 0:33:12 UTC

If they increase the fee to send my packets to boinc project server then my business will raise fees a bit to cover the expense. But that why I bitcoin mine at same time as bionc processing to raise "value" for the time.

--chris
http://digitalatoll.com/
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Message 1540318 - Posted: 12 Jul 2014, 13:18:52 UTC

Thanks for the post. I though this complete zero, therefore, to comment on many will not. I am from Belarus. We have no such problems with the Internet. It will be bad, if this project will stop.We hope that things will get better and will be well.
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Message 1540367 - Posted: 12 Jul 2014, 15:12:25 UTC

It seems to me that net neutrality is a very core principle of the internet; that being co-opted by Comcast is a sad fact of how big business operates and a government not controlled by the governed allows it to happen.
The question of "monopoly" is set in motion and created by the municipal governments when they "choose" a cable ISP to operate in their town or city... it's pretty much a done deal, there is no actual choice.
(When Verizon rents out tower capacity to their "competition" because they own all the towers, they probably do not create equal price structure for their competition.)
Regulations have also created these quasi-monopolies by being specifically written to appear as if they are promoting free markets all while actually squashing any real competition. The deepest pockets creates the regulations in US. I'm all for Liberty and Free Market systems, but that is quite opposite of the direction the US and the world has take over the last decade or so.
I still hope for an internet that is truly accessible by all and truly net neutral. Eric, thanks for this post.
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Message 1540475 - Posted: 12 Jul 2014, 19:15:26 UTC

This new act will damage the internet so much that projects like this one will be a thing of the past.
No matter what we say or how much we scream and yell this will pass.
Our societies are no longer being run by the people and we will have no say.
The corporations will indeed have their way.
Like the Smart Meter crap that the majority of the population said no to had us being subject to blackmail.
We were told that if we did not get the meter then we would be charged 100 dollars a month.
So now we have a meter. Smart meters have taken jobs away from Canadians and Americans.

I download movies and I did get a notice that I was downloading pirated material from Shaw communications.
I told them if I can do it then I will.
They refuse to spend millions of dollars placing "Stops" in the system so that we can't download so I have no heard back from them at all.
We must protect the net from the governments


Michael Miles
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Message 1540497 - Posted: 12 Jul 2014, 19:55:24 UTC - in response to Message 1539304.  

After reading Eric's blog & doing some further research on this, I can see this becoming the "sub-prime" disaster for the Internet.

There is a simple solution but one that will be difficult to implement: -

Have all non-US ISP's block ALL content to & from the Continental US. Hit these companies where it hurts the most - Their wallets!

I wonder what the NSA would say with no access to worldwide net traffic...

=========================================================================
the problem with this is all the domain name servers are in the us and the nsa has so far blocked any attempt to move them.

(...).


Incorrect. A lot of root DNS servers are located in the USA but they have others located worldwide.
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Message 1540606 - Posted: 13 Jul 2014, 0:39:05 UTC - in response to Message 1539076.  

In the UK British Telecom runs the UK internet backbone on behalf of the country and the government. Due to local loop unbundling overseen by Ofcom, BT lost it's monopoly and have to allow various ISP's to put their equipment in BT's exchanges. Also most major cities and towns have now been "passed" (damn silly term) by the Cable TV companies. In addition the public utilities of water, gas, and electricity now offer internet access. There is lots of choices, but the UK is smaller than some US states so it is different here.

I think Eric is quite right to raise this issue, but it is as much a political one as a technical one. I don't think it will prove to be the death knell of public distributed computing, but it could make it more difficult and expensive to participate in future.


Actually, in the UK the public utilities such as water, gas and electricity and the more obscure ISPs all use BT's infrastructure. In this country we have only two possible suppliers, BT for ALL the ADSL and VDSL offerings (although it may be disguised as a different ISP as far as services and support are concerned) and Virgin Media for fibre connections in areas where they have invested in installing the required infrastructure. Even Virgin buy their ADSL connections from BT so they have a presence in areas where they haven't had to dig the roads up.
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Message 1540656 - Posted: 13 Jul 2014, 2:53:24 UTC - in response to Message 1538832.  

Just when I get my TARDIS back online, the government below is trying to change my access to the world and my home planet...

I want to keep my internet open to traffic from all over the world and it would be a shame if the BOING projects I currently support on all my multidimensional / multiprocessor computers could not return results on a regular basic.

Does this mean I'm not going to be able to watch my Japanese anime without paying big bucks?
Does this mean I can't contact all my companions in a crisis?
Does this mean I'm not going to view my favorite eye candy?

Jefferson aka SpaceDog in geog-sync orbit over N30°30'2.9" x W084°13'54.1"
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Message 1540720 - Posted: 13 Jul 2014, 6:01:22 UTC

They have not taken into consideration, how much this will impact the international internet! Or have they? Controlling bandwidth and content in the USA dramatically restricts access to information for the rest of the world. But also it dramatically restricts information FROM the rest of the world. The USA becomes more and more isolationist relative to the rest of the world and its citizens are more and more restricted in the information they can get. I thought that the corollary of "freedom of speech" was "freedom to find information". In a weird way this attempt could be a breach of the US Constitution far more serious and impactful than any restriction on gun control. By restricting the means by which free speech and information is transmitted, you are restricting free speech itself. "You can say what you like, we will make sure no-one can hear you!!" This is an incredibly sinister trend!
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Message 1540735 - Posted: 13 Jul 2014, 7:03:31 UTC

Received the following reply this morning to a letter sent to the FCC:

Thank you very much for contacting us about the ongoing Open Internet proceeding. We're hoping to hear from as many people as possible about this critical issue, and so I'm very glad that we can include your thoughts and opinions.

I'm a strong supporter of the Open Internet, and I will fight to keep the internet open. Thanks again for sharing your views with me.

Tom Wheeler
Chairman
Federal Communications Commission

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Message 1540800 - Posted: 13 Jul 2014, 10:32:55 UTC

The whole world seems to be worried.
Even Belarus:) Thanks zubr2009.
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Message 1540844 - Posted: 13 Jul 2014, 13:15:12 UTC - in response to Message 1538832.  

Hi, Mr. Korpela,

i am german. I can't comment things on that pages, it is only for american people.

i'm looking for similar pages in internet

Best regards
Caspar Wahl- vom Bruch
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Message 1540991 - Posted: 13 Jul 2014, 16:24:57 UTC - in response to Message 1540844.  

Hi, Mr. Korpela,
i am german. I can't comment things on that pages, it is only for american people.
i'm looking for similar pages in internet
Best regards
Caspar Wahl- vom Bruch

Maybe it's because of this:
http://articles.philly.com/2014-06-28/business/50914949_1_tom-wheeler-fcc-officials-open-internet-proposal
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rob smith Special Project $250 donor
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Message 1541069 - Posted: 13 Jul 2014, 17:47:19 UTC

In part, but only a small part - the FCC site, as far as I can see, will only accept comments from citizens of the "good old US of A". Here we see an example of those that can in the USA causing/promoting problems for everyone else in the world, who are not US citizens, and have no say in what is being done in the USA...
Bob Smith
Member of Seti PIPPS (Pluto is a Planet Protest Society)
Somewhere in the (un)known Universe?
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Message 1541070 - Posted: 13 Jul 2014, 17:47:38 UTC

Copied and posted remarks to help stop the end of net neutrality. To me it seems that allowing the government to appoint someone from the back ground as they did the FCC is a farce in its self. Maybe its time we looked to stop any presidential appointments and or limit the powers of these heads of government. Especially when it is such an obvious misuse of power for personal gain! Just my thoughts. Only been with S.E T.I. Home about a year.
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Message 1541077 - Posted: 13 Jul 2014, 17:53:00 UTC - in response to Message 1540991.  

German or not it effects you so go ahead and speak out! Things happing here in the U.S. effects a lot of the world. What happens when you want to start a company and we here in the U.S. are not allowed to see your web pages? With greed there is no boarders!
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Message 1541103 - Posted: 13 Jul 2014, 18:55:47 UTC - in response to Message 1538832.  

I filed my comments against FCC Dockets 14-28 and 10-127. Thank you!
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Message boards : SETI@home Staff Blog : What does loss of net neutrality mean for volunteer computing?


 
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