Why Canada and America Should Become One Country by DIANE FRANCIS


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Profile Byron Leigh Hatch @ team Carl SaganProject donor
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Message 1503074 - Posted: 12 Apr 2014, 9:03:42 UTC

Why Canada and America Should Become One Country by DIANE FRANCIS April 10, 2014

WOW ..... this article by DIANE FRANCIS April 10, 2014 should spark a lot heated discussion ..... Lets keep it civil folks :)

Diane Francis is editor at large with the National Post, broadcaster and distinguished professor at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management.

She is author of Merger of the Century: Why Canada and America Should Become One Country.

I found this article on www.politico.com by DIANE FRANCIS April 10, 2014


I made the Links clickable ... I hope ? ... so please take a few minutes to read the news story and tell us how it would work ?

http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2014/04/why-the-us-should-merge-with-canada-105610.html#ixzz2yehu6BXF

Why the U.S. Should Merge With Canada By DIANE FRANCIS April 10, 2014


http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2014/04/why-the-us-should-merge-with-canada-105610.html?ml=po_r#.U0jrK6ZOV9A

FIRST OFF:

1) as I understand it Scotland wants to seperate from the UK ?

2) did not Czechoslovak Separate into two Nation ?

3) and of course did not the former Yugoslavia have a civil war and separated into ... What 4 OR 5 Nations ?

4) so Nations of the world seem to be going the other way ?

5) and Canada is a:

Canada is a federal parliamentary democracy and a constitutional monarchy, with Queen Elizabeth II as its head of state. Canada is a member of the Commonwealth of Nations. The country is officially bilingual at the federal level. It is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multicultural nations, the product of large-scale immigration from many countries, with a population of approximately 35 million as of December 2012. Its advanced economy is one of the largest in the world, relying chiefly upon its abundant natural resources and well-developed trade networks. Canada's long and complex relationship with the United States has had a significant impact on its economy and culture.

and Canada has single payer health system ....

with the two Countries Canada and US of A .... both have different Constitutions .... how would that work ?

Ok Let the fun begin ... or Let the Hockey game begin ... no high sticks or hard checking :) LOL

tell us how you think it would be possible for Canada and the USA to be come one Nation ?

Because I don't know how that could work ?

what you think or what your opinion is ?

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Message 1503077 - Posted: 12 Apr 2014, 9:16:48 UTC

Absolutely NOT; Bieber will NEVER be an American, let him stay up there with the draft dodgers.

Then there is the whole Queen thing, no way.



Then there is that whole French thing. If a country speaks different languages it is a civil war waiting to happen.
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Message 1503101 - Posted: 12 Apr 2014, 10:32:58 UTC - in response to Message 1503077.

So when is CA leaving, with only ~43% of population speaking "English" as its first language.

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Message 1503124 - Posted: 12 Apr 2014, 11:48:23 UTC

Why would they? There is no need to unify, and besides, Canada and the US differ in a number of key aspects, making any kind of unification into one political union an extremely painful process which leaves neither side happy.

Or they would have to go the EU route which is unification on a set of policy fields, such as trade while otherwise remaining separate. However, that would require the creation of a new supranational organization that has power over both the national governments in the US and Canada. I don't see that ever happening in either country.


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Message 1503130 - Posted: 12 Apr 2014, 12:21:51 UTC
Last modified: 12 Apr 2014, 20:47:04 UTC

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Message 1503137 - Posted: 12 Apr 2014, 12:53:01 UTC - in response to Message 1503130.

FIRST, Canada would have to agree 100% with our constitution. THEN, they'd have to get congress to ALLOW them into our union. And the only way that'd happen is if Canada could show that they'd be of some sort of value to us (or somehow secretly bribe a whole bunch of democrats at this time with out getting caught.)

Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands have been trying for a while.

Canada, please go to the end of the line and wait.

And see here why it would never work.

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Message 1503142 - Posted: 12 Apr 2014, 13:13:09 UTC - in response to Message 1503130.

FIRST, Canada would have to agree 100% with our constitution. THEN, they'd have to get congress to ALLOW them into our union. And the only way that'd happen is if Canada could show that they'd be of some sort of value to us (or somehow secretly bribe a whole bunch of democrats at this time with out getting caught.)

Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands have been trying for a while.

Canada, please go to the end of the line and wait.

This is about a NEW Country. Not Joining the US.
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Message 1503144 - Posted: 12 Apr 2014, 13:31:08 UTC
Last modified: 12 Apr 2014, 20:47:12 UTC

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Message 1503145 - Posted: 12 Apr 2014, 13:35:42 UTC - in response to Message 1503124.


Or they would have to go the EU route which is unification on a set of policy fields, such as trade while otherwise remaining separate. However, that would require the creation of a new supranational organization that has power over both the national governments in the US and Canada. I don't see that ever happening in either country.

What is happening are some States and Providences are working together without federal government involvement. They share driving violations with each other.

I find it fascinating the an American cannot tell a Canadian form one of our own. There is even a game, dead or Cnidarian. Lorne Greene dead or Canadian? Tad Cruz dead or Canadian? When I visit Quebec the people turn their nose up at me until they find out I'm American then they love me because I tip.

Northern Maine is not on the US electric grid but the Candida. In my life time US and Cnidarian money was tied together to the penny. A formal unification is not necessary and just the talk of it is probably making future draft dodgers crap their pants.
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Message 1503149 - Posted: 12 Apr 2014, 13:58:22 UTC

Sorry America, we are not currently in a position to accept that many prisoners.

For non-Canadian readers, you should realize that the paper Byron quoted in the original post is commonly known in some Great White North circles as the Nazi Post.
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Message 1503153 - Posted: 12 Apr 2014, 14:12:29 UTC - in response to Message 1503149.

Sorry America, we are not currently in a position to accept that many prisoners.

For non-Canadian readers, you should realize that the paper Byron quoted in the original post is commonly known in some Great White North circles as the Nazi Post.

This is fascinating, she went to Canada with her draft dodging husband in 1966. Screw them they wiped their butts with the flag and now they want back? I don't think so.

Dead or Canada; William Shatner?
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Message 1503161 - Posted: 12 Apr 2014, 14:31:10 UTC - in response to Message 1503153.

Dead or Canada; William Shatner?

Who cares?
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Message 1503164 - Posted: 12 Apr 2014, 14:39:26 UTC

I think the USA and Canada have a very good working relationship the way things are. Canada has way more shale oil than they can ever use and the USA is their best customer of convenience. Due to the increase in terrorist activities around the world our borders are not quite as open as they were in the past but generally Canadians and Americans(I realize we are all Americans but what other term is appropriate for citizens of the USA) can travel at will into the other country. We share responsibility for the defence of North America and with the exception of a few fishing grounds disputes the two countries get along well. Canada and the USA are better off just staying very good friends and not getting married.

The last I heard Puerto Rico still doesn't have a majority of voters who want to become a state. Why should they? They have most of the benefits and none of the responsibilities.
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Message 1503169 - Posted: 12 Apr 2014, 14:47:28 UTC - in response to Message 1503164.
Last modified: 12 Apr 2014, 14:49:28 UTC

The last I heard Puerto Rico still doesn't have a majority of voters who want to become a state. Why should they? They have most of the benefits and none of the responsibilities.

Actually, the majority of Puerto Rico voted for Statehood in a Non-Binding Referendum.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/11/07/politics/election-puerto-rico/index.html

Canada and the USA are better off just staying very good friends and not getting married.

How about 'Very Good Friends'? IE: Pre-Engaged. :)
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Message 1517615 - Posted: 17 May 2014, 20:39:41 UTC - in response to Message 1503137.
Last modified: 17 May 2014, 21:28:38 UTC

FIRST, Canada would have to agree 100% with our constitution. THEN, they'd have to get congress to ALLOW them into our union. And the only way that'd happen is if Canada could show that they'd be of some sort of value to us (or somehow secretly bribe a whole bunch of democrats at this time with out getting caught.)

Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands have been trying for a while.

Canada, please go to the end of the line and wait.

And see here why it would never work.

aahh ... Politics ... OK here we go ...

first off ... I hope I don't offend any of my American friends by speaking plainly ...

OK here you are Ladies and Gents ... a little history Lesson.

I guess this gets into Nationalism ...

nationalistic rants ?

But Canada was invited to join the United States

One mostly forgotten part of the Articles of Confederation,

America’s first Constitution, there was an open invitation for Canada to join the United States, with no strings attached.

The invitation was officially made on March 1, 1781, when the Articles were ratified as Maryland became the 13th and final state to approve them. But some of the Founding Fathers had their eyes on a 14th state: Canada.

The desire to add Canada to the union was so strong that American negotiators at the Treaty of Paris,
which ended the Revolutionary War,
demanded that Canada be ceded to the United States as part of the treaty.

The demand was later dropped and the treaty was signed in 1783 as Britain formally ended hostilities with the newly formed United States.

The formal invite to Canada was unique and came in the form of Article XI of the Articles of Confederation:

Canada acceding to this confederation, and adjoining in the measures of the United States, shall be admitted into, and entitled to all the advantages of this Union; but no other colony shall be admitted into the same, unless such admission be agreed to by nine States,” the document says.

At the time, Ontario and Quebec made up what was called Canada.

and also there was the Crown colony of British Columbia on the west coast of Canada. 49 th parallel up to Prince Rupert at 54 degrees 40 minuets

That provision allowed the residents of Canada to petition the United States for immediate inclusion in the United States, assuming the Canadians had ended their relationship with the crown. It excluded other British colonies, which would need a vote from the Confederation Congress.

According to Canadian census records, the population of Canada in 1784 was an estimated 166,000 residents. It included loyalists who had fled the United States.

Compared to population estimates for the American colonies from 1780, Canada would have ranked ninth or even possibly 10th in population if it had joined the United States.

The invitation stood open until the proposed (now current) U.S. Constitution was ratified in June 1788 and a new government took office in March 1789.

In any event, there seems to have been little interest among the British colonists in Canada to leave the crown and join their rebellious neighbors to the south. During the American Revolution, the Continental army tried to invade Canada and was repulsed.

The British crown passed its own Constitutional Act of 1791, defining the regions of Upper Canada (Ontario) and Lower Canada (Quebec). The act helped to attract more American immigrants to Ontario and Quebec.

The relationship between the British, their Canadian colonists, and the United States remained strained after 1789, and it was a core political issue in America until the end of the War of 1812.

A second invasion of Canada failed in the War of 1812, as British troops and militia forces made up of loyalists who had left the United States defeated another invading
American army.

The American army burned the Canadian Capital ... at that time Toronto.

So the British army retaliated by burning the White House and the Capitol in Washington.

Since then, the idea of Canada joining the United States has become a moot point.

A 2004 poll from Leger Marketing in Canada showed that only 7 percent of Canadians had any interest in a merger with the United States. The group also polled United States residents, with 19 percent interested in a combined United States–Canada. Only 29 percent of Canadians thought they had a lot in common with Americans.

In an interesting footnote, there is a small group of people who believe the current Constitution was never properly ratified under the terms of the Articles of Confederation. So that invitation to join the United States could be open, but it’s unlikely it would be accepted.


http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2013/03/when-canada-was-invited-to-join-the-united-states/

My own opinion is that I would allow the US of A to join Canada but:

and ... I hope I don't offend any of my American friends by speaking plainly ...

The US OF A would have to agree 100% with our Canadian constitution. THEN, they'd have to get Parliament to ALLOW United States of America into Canada And the only way that would happen is if the US of A ... could show that they'd be of some sort of value to Canada (or somehow secretly bribe 100 % of the two house of Congress of the United States of America and the President of course ... to Become part Canada}

heehee :-)

LOL

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Message 1517618 - Posted: 17 May 2014, 20:42:40 UTC - in response to Message 1517615.



ROFLMAO
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Message 1517633 - Posted: 17 May 2014, 21:51:38 UTC

Canada was asked to join in the rebellion in 1776 but declined. The US was having difficulty taking Quebec City from the British and sent 70 year old Ben Franklin to the "North Country" to ask the Canadians to join US in driving out the British. It was one of his few failed diplomatic missions.
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Message 1517642 - Posted: 17 May 2014, 22:12:20 UTC - in response to Message 1517615.

FIRST, Canada would have to agree 100% with our constitution. THEN, they'd have to get congress to ALLOW them into our union. And the only way that'd happen is if Canada could show that they'd be of some sort of value to us (or somehow secretly bribe a whole bunch of democrats at this time with out getting caught.)

Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands have been trying for a while.

Canada, please go to the end of the line and wait.

And see here why it would never work.

aahh ... Politics ... OK here we go ...

first off ... I hope I don't offend any of my American friends by speaking plainly ...

OK here you are Ladies and Gents ... a little history Lesson.

I guess this gets into Nationalism ...

nationalistic rants ?

But Canada was invited to join the United States

One mostly forgotten part of the Articles of Confederation,

America’s first Constitution, there was an open invitation for Canada to join the United States, with no strings attached.

The invitation was officially made on March 1, 1781, when the Articles were ratified as Maryland became the 13th and final state to approve them. But some of the Founding Fathers had their eyes on a 14th state: Canada.

The desire to add Canada to the union was so strong that American negotiators at the Treaty of Paris,
which ended the Revolutionary War,
demanded that Canada be ceded to the United States as part of the treaty.

The demand was later dropped and the treaty was signed in 1783 as Britain formally ended hostilities with the newly formed United States.

The formal invite to Canada was unique and came in the form of Article XI of the Articles of Confederation:

Canada acceding to this confederation, and adjoining in the measures of the United States, shall be admitted into, and entitled to all the advantages of this Union; but no other colony shall be admitted into the same, unless such admission be agreed to by nine States,” the document says.

At the time, Ontario and Quebec made up what was called Canada.

and also there was the Crown colony of British Columbia on the west coast of Canada. 49 th parallel up to Prince Rupert at 54 degrees 40 minuets

That provision allowed the residents of Canada to petition the United States for immediate inclusion in the United States, assuming the Canadians had ended their relationship with the crown. It excluded other British colonies, which would need a vote from the Confederation Congress.

According to Canadian census records, the population of Canada in 1784 was an estimated 166,000 residents. It included loyalists who had fled the United States.

Compared to population estimates for the American colonies from 1780, Canada would have ranked ninth or even possibly 10th in population if it had joined the United States.

The invitation stood open until the proposed (now current) U.S. Constitution was ratified in June 1788 and a new government took office in March 1789.

In any event, there seems to have been little interest among the British colonists in Canada to leave the crown and join their rebellious neighbors to the south. During the American Revolution, the Continental army tried to invade Canada and was repulsed.

The British crown passed its own Constitutional Act of 1791, defining the regions of Upper Canada (Ontario) and Lower Canada (Quebec). The act helped to attract more American immigrants to Ontario and Quebec.

The relationship between the British, their Canadian colonists, and the United States remained strained after 1789, and it was a core political issue in America until the end of the War of 1812.

A second invasion of Canada failed in the War of 1812, as British troops and militia forces made up of loyalists who had left the United States defeated another invading
American army.

The American army burned the Canadian Capital ... at that time Toronto.

So the British army retaliated by burning the White House and the Capitol in Washington.

Since then, the idea of Canada joining the United States has become a moot point.

A 2004 poll from Leger Marketing in Canada showed that only 7 percent of Canadians had any interest in a merger with the United States. The group also polled United States residents, with 19 percent interested in a combined United States–Canada. Only 29 percent of Canadians thought they had a lot in common with Americans.

In an interesting footnote, there is a small group of people who believe the current Constitution was never properly ratified under the terms of the Articles of Confederation. So that invitation to join the United States could be open, but it’s unlikely it would be accepted.


http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2013/03/when-canada-was-invited-to-join-the-united-states/

My own opinion is that I would allow the US of A to join Canada but:

and ... I hope I don't offend any of my American friends by speaking plainly ...

The US OF A would have to agree 100% with our Canadian constitution. THEN, they'd have to get Parliament to ALLOW United States of America into Canada And the only way that would happen is if the US of A ... could show that they'd be of some sort of value to Canada (or somehow secretly bribe 100 % of the two house of Congress of the United States of America and the President of course ... to Become part Canada}

heehee :-)

LOL


No offense taken here. I would hope that sensible Canadians would vote no. To me, Why would you want to merge with a dysfunctional family:)
All kidding aside, We should just remain as we are, Friends.
Do both countrys get on each others nerves sometimes? Yes, But I cant think of a better next door nieghbor to have then Canada.
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Message 1517657 - Posted: 17 May 2014, 22:49:33 UTC

I don't think it would be constitutionally possible. The countries are similar but very different. I can drive 3,000 across the US and things are very much the same. If I drive 379 miles to Montreal it's like I'm in a different country.
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Message 1517670 - Posted: 17 May 2014, 23:04:39 UTC - in response to Message 1517657.

I don't think it would be constitutionally possible. The countries are similar but very different. I can drive 3,000 across the US and things are very much the same. If I drive 379 miles to Montreal it's like I'm in a different country.


...but you would be. Or are you suggesting that Canada is the 51st state?
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