The James Webb Space Telescope

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Profile Julie
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Message 1495148 - Posted: 25 Mar 2014, 15:49:18 UTC

This month, the flight Near-Infrared Camera was installed into the flight Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) for the James Webb Space Telescope. NIRCam joins the flight Fine Guidance Sensor/ Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (FGS/NIRISS) and Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) which are already integrated into the ISIM. The flight Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) will be installed next.

The NIRCam is JWST's primary imager and will be returning beautiful images of the universe.
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Message 1499131 - Posted: 3 Apr 2014, 15:11:20 UTC

Mars Rover Opportunity Faces New Threat: Budget Ax

The JWST mission was under review for cancellation by the United States Congress in 2011 after about $3 billion had been spent, and more than 75 percent of its hardware was either in production or undergoing testing. In November 2011, Congress reversed plans to cancel the JWST and instead capped additional funding to complete the project at $8 billion.
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Message 1499250 - Posted: 3 Apr 2014, 18:27:41 UTC - in response to Message 1499131.  

Mars Rover Opportunity Faces New Threat: Budget Ax

The JWST mission was under review for cancellation by the United States Congress in 2011 after about $3 billion had been spent, and more than 75 percent of its hardware was either in production or undergoing testing. In November 2011, Congress reversed plans to cancel the JWST and instead capped additional funding to complete the project at $8 billion.


I'm always stunned by how much money can be found for military "investments". It seems a shocking waste of money to cancel this mission so far into it. :(
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Message 1526836 - Posted: 11 Jun 2014, 12:05:46 UTC

The Potential for Detecting Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows from Population III Stars with the Next Generation of Infrared Telescopes.

Why JWST is important:- We model the flux density of GRBs from Pop III stars through JWST IR filters, and determine the length of time this flux density remains above JWST's sensitivity limits

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Message 1526839 - Posted: 11 Jun 2014, 12:19:03 UTC

Mock the Bus

At Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems facilities in Redondo Beach, California, integration and test technicians work on a mock-up of the James Webb Space Telescope spacecraft bus, testing the assembly of its parts.

The spacecraft bus will provide the necessary support functions for the operation of the Webb Observatory after it is launched into space in 2018.

The bus is the home for six major subsystems:


•Electrical Power Subsystem
•Attitude Control Subsystem
•Communication Subsystem
•Command and Data Handling Subsystem
•Propulsion Subsystem
•Thermal Control Subsystem

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Message 1529174 - Posted: 17 Jun 2014, 22:13:07 UTC - in response to Message 1526839.  

Webb's Fully Integrated 'Heart' Lowered into the Chamber

Engineer Jack Marshall held his breath. The "heart" of the James Webb Space Telescope hung from a cable 30 feet in the air as it was lowered slowly into the massive thermal vacuum chamber at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

This "heart" of Webb is called the ISIM or Integrated Science Instrument Module, which along with its thermal vacuum test frame and supporting hardware, weighs about as much as an elephant. Within this test frame, ISIM sits inside a big-mirrored cube of cryo-panels and blankets. This process can be seen in a video by a Goddard videographer.

http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/webbs-fully-integrated-heart-lowered-into-the-chamber/index.html
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Message 1529195 - Posted: 17 Jun 2014, 23:28:25 UTC
Last modified: 17 Jun 2014, 23:33:42 UTC

There is a good article in the July, 2014 issue of Smithsonian Air & Space Magazine about the James Webb telescope. It is online here
http://www.airspacemag.com/space/infrared-dawn-next-space-telescope-will-be-hubble-x-100-180951409/
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My motto: Never do today what you can put off until tomorrow as it may not be required. This no longer applies in light of current events.
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Message 1529261 - Posted: 18 Jun 2014, 2:14:37 UTC - in response to Message 1529195.  

There is a good article in the July, 2014 issue of Smithsonian Air & Space Magazine about the James Webb telescope. It is online here
http://www.airspacemag.com/space/infrared-dawn-next-space-telescope-will-be-hubble-x-100-180951409/


Thanks for the article!

James Webb Space Telescope, will be up and running 2018.
Will be able to look way back in time.

Hubble, will continue to gaze the stars.
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Message 1535456 - Posted: 3 Jul 2014, 12:36:19 UTC

Webb Telescope Microshutters Journey into NASA Clean Room

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope microshutters have taken a short jaunt in preparation of its million mile journey in four years. The microshutters were moved into a NASA Goddard cleanroom for testing to verify they work correctly before being installed in the Webb's Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) instrument.


Click the link to watch the video
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Message 1535574 - Posted: 3 Jul 2014, 18:05:45 UTC

Building such things is amazing, and I'm sure it's very rewarding for every member of the team. Even if one job may be very dull and tedious, at least it is known what piece in the puzzle it is. I think about projects like the atom bomb when many of the workers didn't know the purpose of their minutiae. I'm looking forward to the launch. Hopefully they have redundancies for the redundancies in case of a malfunction since it won't be able to be visited for a fix.
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Message 1535593 - Posted: 3 Jul 2014, 19:28:35 UTC - in response to Message 1535574.  

Building such things is amazing, and I'm sure it's very rewarding for every member of the team. Even if one job may be very dull and tedious, at least it is known what piece in the puzzle it is. I think about projects like the atom bomb when many of the workers didn't know the purpose of their minutiae. I'm looking forward to the launch. Hopefully they have redundancies for the redundancies in case of a malfunction since it won't be able to be visited for a fix.


+1
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Message 1539025 - Posted: 10 Jul 2014, 8:33:48 UTC

Testing Completed on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope Backplane


NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has reached another development milestone with the completion of static load testing of its primary mirror backplane support structure (PMBSS) moving the telescope one step closer to its 2018 launch. "This is the largest, most complex cryogenically stable structure humans have ever built," said Scott Texter, Optical Telescope Element manager for Northrop Grumman. "Completion of the static testing verifies it can hold the weight it is designed to hold. Now the structural backbone of the observatory is officially verified and ready for integration."

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Message 1539705 - Posted: 11 Jul 2014, 10:19:19 UTC

Leading Space Experts to Discuss the Search for Life Beyond Earth


Space and ground observatories are cataloging and characterizing hundreds and what is expected to eventually be thousands of potentially habitable worlds in our galaxy. NASA space-based observatories are making unprecedented new discoveries. The agency’s next step, the James Webb Space Telescope (Webb telescope), will continue to help scientists rewrite scientific textbooks after its scheduled launch in 2018.

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Message 1541959 - Posted: 15 Jul 2014, 9:44:08 UTC
Last modified: 15 Jul 2014, 9:44:26 UTC

Finding Life Beyond Earth is Within Reach

NASA's quest to study planetary systems around other stars started with ground-based observatories, then moved to space-based assets like the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Kepler Space Telescope. Today's telescopes can look at many stars and tell if they have one or more orbiting planets. Even more, they can determine if the planets are the right distance away from the star to have liquid water, the key ingredient to life as we know it. The James Webb Space Telescope will be one of the primary instruments scientists use to continue the search for planets outside our Solar System.

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Message 1546828 - Posted: 24 Jul 2014, 8:21:00 UTC

Discover the "X-Factor" of NASA's Webb Telescope in "Behind the Webb" Video

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray observatory have something in common: a huge test chamber used to simulate the hazards of space and the distant glow of starlight. Viewers can learn about this mysterious chamber and its history in "X-Factor," a new video in the "Behind the Webb" series. The video takes viewers behind the scenes to understand more about the Webb telescope and how it compares with other NASA observatories.



Click link to watch the video
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Message 1548888 - Posted: 28 Jul 2014, 10:22:17 UTC

NASA's Webb Sunshield Stacks Up to Test!

The Sunshield on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is the largest part of the observatory—five layers of thin membrane that must unfurl reliably in space to precise tolerances. Last week, for the first time, engineers stacked and unfurled a full-sized test unit of the Sunshield and it worked perfectly.
The Sunshield is about the length of a tennis court, and will be folded up like an umbrella around the Webb telescope’s mirrors and instruments during launch. Once it reaches its orbit, the Webb telescope will receive a command from Earth to unfold, and separate the Sunshield's five layers into their precisely stacked arrangement with its kite-like shape.



For more information about the Webb telescope, visit: http://www.jwst.nasa.gov or http://www.nasa.gov/webb
For more information on the Webb Sunshield, visit: http://jwst.nasa.gov/sunshield.html
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Message 1548946 - Posted: 28 Jul 2014, 13:23:51 UTC

so far so good then 3 more yrs till launch . Let's hope the optics are ok this time seeing as that's what they stuffed last time with hubble

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Message 1549039 - Posted: 28 Jul 2014, 16:42:44 UTC - in response to Message 1548946.  

so far so good then 3 more yrs till launch . Let's hope the optics are ok this time seeing as that's what they stuffed last time with hubble

Yes, this time a second or third repair mission is not possible. It must work at the first instance.
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Message 1549043 - Posted: 28 Jul 2014, 16:51:11 UTC - in response to Message 1549039.  

so far so good then 3 more yrs till launch . Let's hope the optics are ok this time seeing as that's what they stuffed last time with hubble

Yes, this time a second or third repair mission is not possible. It must work at the first instance.
Tullio



!! Very risky! Could become a very expensive abberation... (let's hope it won't!)
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Message 1549053 - Posted: 28 Jul 2014, 17:04:29 UTC - in response to Message 1549043.  

so far so good then 3 more yrs till launch . Let's hope the optics are ok this time seeing as that's what they stuffed last time with hubble

Yes, this time a second or third repair mission is not possible. It must work at the first instance.
Tullio



!! Very risky! Could become a very expensive abberation... (let's hope it won't!)



+ 100!! :)

Thanks for the updates Julie :)
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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : The James Webb Space Telescope


 
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