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Message 1877165 - Posted: 6 Jul 2017, 21:35:21 UTC - in response to Message 1861261.  


LHC double heavy particle to shine light on strong force


Scientists have detected a new particle at the Large Hadron Collider at Cern.

The discovery will help researchers learn more about the so-called "strong force" which holds the centres of atoms together.

The existence of the new particle was theoretically predicted but this is the first time it has been identified.

The details of the Xi-cc++ particle were presented at a high-energy physics conference in Venice.

Good!
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Message 1877173 - Posted: 6 Jul 2017, 22:12:53 UTC - in response to Message 1877165.  

The details of the Xi-cc++ particle were presented at a high-energy physics conference in Venice.

Ξcc++ or Xicc++
Weird name for a particle.
Since it's a baryon shouldn't it have a name ending with -on?
Like proton and neutron.
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Message 1877201 - Posted: 7 Jul 2017, 1:47:38 UTC

The name says it has 2 charm quarks and a double positive charge. The proton has charge 1 and the neutron has charge zero.
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Message 1883541 - Posted: 13 Aug 2017, 8:11:11 UTC - in response to Message 1435727.  

Another way of defining a Joule is that it is about the amount of energy used in each heartbeat...
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Message 1883583 - Posted: 13 Aug 2017, 14:42:52 UTC - in response to Message 1883541.  

Luckily our hearts performs better by one hundred times.

You need at least eat about 2000 kcal per day.
That's about 8 million Joules.
A heart rate at 1 per second is 86400 beats per day when not exercising .
About 100 J/s of energy are then distributed by the heart to our body.
Roughly 100 Watts.

At CERN they use electronvolt instead to measure energy and mass.
A heartbeat produces more then 6*10^20 Ev per heartbeat !
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Message 1897714 - Posted: 27 Oct 2017, 6:30:09 UTC - in response to Message 1883583.  

Can't go back to a moment time.


Scientists baffled: Universe shouldn't exist


Despite the organization’s $1.24 billion annual budget for 2017, the physicists at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, are being forced to admit failure in their latest effort to explain why any of us are here.

Indeed, why there’s even a “here” here at all.

“The universe should not actually exist,” said Christian Smorra, a physicist at CERN’s Baryon–Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) collaboration.

CERN, founded in 1954, features a circular tunnel some 17 miles around that houses a particle accelerator, which uses peak energy of 14 trillion electron volts to speed particles to nearly the speed of light and allow them to collide. It is underneath Switzerland near its border with France.
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Message 1897749 - Posted: 27 Oct 2017, 15:58:49 UTC

Anybody wanting to cooperate with CERN can download the BOINC LHC@home project, which hosts a number of programs all using VirtualBox except SixTrack.
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Message 1897751 - Posted: 27 Oct 2017, 16:44:05 UTC - in response to Message 1897714.  

Can't go back to a moment time.


Scientists baffled: Universe shouldn't exist


Despite the organization’s $1.24 billion annual budget for 2017, the physicists at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, are being forced to admit failure in their latest effort to explain why any of us are here.

Indeed, why there’s even a “here” here at all.

“The universe should not actually exist,” said Christian Smorra, a physicist at CERN’s Baryon–Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) collaboration.

CERN, founded in 1954, features a circular tunnel some 17 miles around that houses a particle accelerator, which uses peak energy of 14 trillion electron volts to speed particles to nearly the speed of light and allow them to collide. It is underneath Switzerland near its border with France.


The linked article appears to suggest that antimatter may be found to fall away from matter (antigravity). This makes sense, as it would avoid annihilating interactions with matter, and allow the universe to exist.

Antigravity antimatter has been considered very improbable, but given the failure of other solutions to the stated problem, perhaps it is not.
The implications of a substance with antigravity properties are intriguing, to say the least.
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Message 1899725 - Posted: 7 Nov 2017, 12:28:40 UTC

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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : CERN


 
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