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Profile Julie
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Message 1642775 - Posted: 16 Feb 2015, 8:08:54 UTC
Last modified: 16 Feb 2015, 8:14:51 UTC

Update:

CERN experiment brings precision to a cornerstone of particle physics

Geneva, 11 February 2015. In a paper published yesterday in the journal Physical Review Letters, the COMPASS experiment at CERN1 reports a key measurement on the strong interaction. The strong interaction binds quarks into protons and neutrons, and protons and neutrons into the nuclei of all the elements from which matter is built. Inside those nuclei, particles called pions made up of a quark and an antiquark mediate the interaction. Strong interaction theory makes a precise prediction on the polarisability of pions – the degree to which their shape can be stretched. This polarisability has baffled scientists since the 1980s, when the first measurements appeared to be at odds with the theory.

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Message 1642844 - Posted: 16 Feb 2015, 11:53:32 UTC

Thanks for the info Julie.

They seem to have repaired it, redesigned it, updated it, and strengthened it as well. I appreciate that they are at the forefront of physics research, but this MkII version seems so different from the original its almost like a separate new machine. I don't think there was that much constraint on the original budget to build it, but wasn't it supposed to be designed to work at 13-15 TeV in Season 1? After a 2 year shut down they are now hoping to reach those speeds in Season 2 starting in March.

Looking at the close up pictures of it I would say that it WAS built to manned spacecraft standards, but I accept that a basically R&D project doesn't always get it right first time round.

On 14 March 2013 CERN confirmed that:

"CMS and ATLAS have compared a number of options for the spin-parity of this particle, and these all prefer no spin and positive parity [two fundamental criteria of a Higgs boson consistent with the Standard Model]. This, coupled with the measured interactions of the new particle with other particles, strongly indicates that it is a Higgs boson."

So have they 100% found this damn thing or not?

As for the shuttles .....

They lost 40% of the shuttles and none of the shuttles made it to their design lifespan of 100 launches.

40% is a true figure with the loss of Challenger and Columbia out of of the 5 shuttles. But the shuttle program was shut down partly because of lack of funding, it cost $1.2 billion per launch, and also because they were 30 years old with a design life of 15 years. They might have got a few more years out of a couple of them them but it would have been make do and mend with old technology, and spare parts from Ebay!

Apart from which the ISS was now complete, and Space X was leveraging up to take it's place, and Russia were providing lifts to the ISS.
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Message 1642919 - Posted: 16 Feb 2015, 17:19:16 UTC

BBC
gluino

Gluons are the carriers of the strong force between the quarks. They exist in three versions, called colors: red green and blue. Quarks exist in six types.
Professor Higgs says he did not believe in the existence of quarks until the Seventies.
Tullio
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Message 1642922 - Posted: 16 Feb 2015, 17:31:26 UTC - in response to Message 1642919.  
Last modified: 16 Feb 2015, 17:36:18 UTC

BBC
gluino

Gluons are the carriers of the strong force between the quarks. They exist in three versions, called colors: red green and blue. Quarks exist in six types.
Professor Higgs says he did not believe in the existence of quarks until the Seventies.
Tullio


But importantly, those decay products should include the lightest and most stable superparticle, known as the neutralino – the particle that researchers have proposed is what makes up dark matter, the missing mass in the cosmos that gravitationally binds galaxies together on the sky but which cannot be seen directly with telescopes.

"This would rock the world,” said Prof Heinemann. "For me, it’s more exciting than the Higgs."


We need something else to rock the world grmpf...professor.... Why is it so important to create antimatter?? Why the hell do we need antimatter?

The University of California at Berkeley researcher made her comments at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

http://meetings.aaas.org/
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Message 1642938 - Posted: 16 Feb 2015, 18:06:39 UTC - in response to Message 1642922.  

The neutralino is not antimatter but a WIMP, a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle, which would solve the dark matter mystery.
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Message 1642945 - Posted: 16 Feb 2015, 18:35:43 UTC

"We hope that we're just now at this threshold that we're finding another world, like antimatter for instance. We found antimatter in the beginning of the last century. Maybe we'll find now supersymmetric matter."


Supersymmetric matter?!? Oh c'mon, those are just meaningless words man. This makes me think of the energy world, because particles consist of energy. Energy can't be humanly controlled. Building a space telescope like the JWST is perfectly controlled by humans, therefore it cannot harm anyone.
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Message 1642961 - Posted: 16 Feb 2015, 19:03:08 UTC - in response to Message 1642945.  

Antimatter was foreseen by Dirac in his equation, and was found later by Anderson, Powell and Occhialini.There is tittle antimatter in our world, but it is used in Positron Emission Tomography for medical radiology.
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Message 1643184 - Posted: 17 Feb 2015, 8:45:43 UTC

It just seems to me that everytime a new even smaller particle is found, it is then found to have even smaller component particles and so on and so on. Will they still be finding new particles in 100 years or is there a theoretical limit to the number of them?
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Message 1643189 - Posted: 17 Feb 2015, 9:03:05 UTC - in response to Message 1643184.  

It just seems to me that everytime a new even smaller particle is found, it is then found to have even smaller component particles and so on and so on. Will they still be finding new particles in 100 years or is there a theoretical limit to the number of them?


According to the Rosicrucian studies there are still 34 elements to be found.
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Message 1643200 - Posted: 17 Feb 2015, 9:32:45 UTC
Last modified: 17 Feb 2015, 9:45:10 UTC

AFAIK there are only three stable particles, the proton, the electron and the neutrino. Ordinary matter is made up from protons, neutrons and electrons, but a free neutron decays with half life of about 15 minutes in a proton, an electron and a neutrino, all with 1/2 spin units. All other particles decay in a short time. They are called fermions, since they obey the Fermi-Dirac statistics and the Pauli exclusion principle, which builds the chemical elements.
Particles with integer spin units are called bosons, since they obey the Bose-Einstein statistics, They are the quanta of the fields. The Hoggs boson has zero spin and is the quantum of the Higgs field, the photon has spin 1 and is the quantum of the electromagnetic field, the still hypothetical graviton has spin 2 and is the quantum of the gravitational field.
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Message 1643203 - Posted: 17 Feb 2015, 9:53:28 UTC

According to the Rosicrucian studies there are still 34 elements to be found.

Interesting, I didn't know that. REAL elements or derived Isotopes etc?
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Message 1643204 - Posted: 17 Feb 2015, 9:54:36 UTC - in response to Message 1643184.  

It just seems to me that everytime a new even smaller particle is found, it is then found to have even smaller component particles and so on and so on. Will they still be finding new particles in 100 years or is there a theoretical limit to the number of them?

Now you're starting to sound like an old foggy dinosaur Chris that doesn't want to acknowledge that new discoveries can be found or that there are other ways to find new 1's that have always existed. It's called progress buddy and it will always be with us whether you like it or not and others will always find new ways to find things. ;-)

Cheers.
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Message 1643211 - Posted: 17 Feb 2015, 10:08:45 UTC - in response to Message 1643203.  

According to the Rosicrucian studies there are still 34 elements to be found.

Interesting, I didn't know that. REAL elements or derived Isotopes etc?


Real elements. I have an adapted periodic table with question marks where the missing elements should come.
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Message 1643220 - Posted: 17 Feb 2015, 10:31:27 UTC
Last modified: 17 Feb 2015, 10:32:13 UTC

Personally I think that the most important discoveries will be not in physical sciences but in the brain/mind and consciousness question, a field pioneered by John Eccles, Karl Pribram and Roger Penrose and now entered also by Federico Faggin, the builder of the first microprocessor. I've had an exchange of ideas with letters with both Pribram and Penrose but all attempts to send my ideas to be read by Italian scientists so far have failed. They probably think I am a crackpot. Only Roberto Battiston, a physicist who is now President of the Italian Space Agency, seemed interested.
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Message 1643223 - Posted: 17 Feb 2015, 10:41:33 UTC - in response to Message 1643204.  

Now now Wiggo, you do me a disservice sir!

I worry that this LHC thing just ticks boxes and fills in holes in charts and doesn't really advance mankind as such.

Q. Is the Higgs Boson going to cure cancers?
Q. Are Fermions going to stop wars?
Q. are Gravitons going to stop IS?

Up, down, strange, charm, top, bottom, back to front, inside out, shake it all about. Oh and don't forget Gluons with Red Green or blue charges. Slight trendy highlight of yellow anyone? At this rate the next new particle they find will have flavours of nice, not nice, partly nice, not nice at all, nice on a good day.

If they can build a tunnel 27 Km long underneath Geneva, perhaps we could borrow the equipment and build a second Euro tunnel from Dover to Calais for freight only, a much better use of the equipment.

We all know why we have our feet on the ground (well some of us do) it is because the earth has a part liquid and part solid iron core and rotates, causing gravity. There does not need to be a Gravitron for that, just ticks another box. Einstein got it wrong Newton got it right. There is no such thing as "curvature of spacetime". Space is space, and time is time, they are different and neither are curved. "the gravitational force of two bodies of mass is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them" makes a lot more sense to me.

It's called progress buddy and it will always be with us whether you like it or not

I like progress, without it the human race would stagnate, if not we'd still be living in caves. Well some do in man ones. But I object to spending millions of dollars just to keep "theoretical" physicists happy. Who cares if there is anti matter or not? Will that increase mankinds enjoyment of life? Yippee, we think we know what makes the universe tick. Meanwhile on a local Council estate, oh dear, I can't afford to pay the rent this month .....

Please re-arrange these words into a well known phrase or saying

"Ground on feet the one's keep"

You want to rattle cages sunshine, be careful who's inside them first :-)))
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Message 1643224 - Posted: 17 Feb 2015, 10:43:26 UTC

Real elements. I have an adapted periodic table with question marks where the missing elements should come.

Can I have a copy please, I would be very interested to see it.
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Message 1643230 - Posted: 17 Feb 2015, 11:17:40 UTC - in response to Message 1643224.  

Real elements. I have an adapted periodic table with question marks where the missing elements should come.

Can I have a copy please, I would be very interested to see it.


Sure, I'll take a pic of it tonight and post it here.
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Message 1644637 - Posted: 20 Feb 2015, 20:15:01 UTC
Last modified: 20 Feb 2015, 20:25:52 UTC

Good news!

For the first time ever, a scientist has detected a simulated version of the so-called “God particle” using superconducting materials, providing evidence that the Higgs boson can be detected without the use of an energy accelerator environment, according to a new study published by the journal Nature Physics.


http://www.redorbit.com/news/technology/1113338068/scientists-witness-simulated-god-particle-for-first-time-022015/

Unlike CERN’s research, which required the use of an advanced particle accelerator that cost approximately $4.75 billion to build, the results of the new experiments were obtained through relatively low-cost methods that took place in a regular laboratory. The findings could also help scientists better understand how the particle behaved in different conditions.

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Message 1644777 - Posted: 21 Feb 2015, 4:13:34 UTC
Last modified: 21 Feb 2015, 4:38:57 UTC

Collision events in LHC are simulated on my computers using the CERN programs vLHC@home and Atlas@home, which require the installation of Virtual Box by Oracle. LHC@home instead checks the stability of particle orbits in the LHC.
The program MCPLOTS gives the number of events simulated by my 3 computers, of which 2 use Linux and one Windows 8.1. I have simulated so far about 879 million events and I am approaching 1 billion events, after which I shall be admitted to the Billionaire club.
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Message 1651658 - Posted: 11 Mar 2015, 13:43:19 UTC

Update:

CERN wins award for best Twitter account in Switzerland

Nicholas Muldoon, Agile coach at Twitter, selected CERN from a list of 10 Twitter accounts (link is external), ranging from tourism to luxury brands to sports personalities. He presented the award to Kate Kahle, CERN’s social media manager and James Gillies, CERN’s head of communication.

“I chose the @CERN account for a number of reasons,” explained Muldoon. “The most significant thing for me was that @CERN is bringing people around the world into one of the greatest explorations of our universe, and doing it in a very social media savvy way.”

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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : CERN


 
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