4x HD7990 + 2x E5-2630v2

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Message 1435253 - Posted: 29 Oct 2013, 21:22:14 UTC - in response to Message 1434911.  
Last modified: 29 Oct 2013, 21:30:53 UTC

AFAIK, the SSDs don't last as long than HDDs.
The continuously writing (of the OS also) reduce the lifespan.
Or not?

Well, let's put it that way... I read a lot and also hear a lot from people I know myself what "interesting" ways they find to reduce the amount of writes to their SSDs, up to the point, where the SSD becomes almost useless, because most of the things, that would really benefit from the fast access times of a SSD are moved to the slow HDD. Same people report after two years or so, that they are going to buy soon a new SSD or have done that already, not because the old one failed but because they simply want a faster and/or larger one.

IMHO the whole this talking about SSD lifetime is pretty much nonsense. Before people complained all the time how short lifetime HDDs have and how often they fail, now that the SSDs are there, they complain how shot lifetime the SSDs have while HDDs suddenly seem to last forever.

Now considering what machine you are going to build here I guess the difference in price between HDD and SSD is not an issue. So if I'd be you, I'd go with SSD-only. I'm actually building a new PC myself, not for myself, for someone else, and we also decided to go SSD-only since SSDs are not that expensive anymore (and HDDs are still more expensive than they was before the flood).

Having two drives in the system like recommended has some downsides too: while saving some writes on the SSD, the HDD is wearing out all the time pretty much regardless of the load. So you have two drives that wear out and have to be replaced one day. Does the longer lifetime of the SSD compensates the additional cost of running an additional HDD, which means not only the purchase of one or more HDDs, but also the additional energy consumption? I wouldn't be sure about that, specially considering the said above.

The only thing I'd recommend as a precautionary measure if you choose the SSD is to decrease the checkpoint interval in BOINC and disable the pagefile (should work without any issue with 32GB RAM).
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Message 1435519 - Posted: 30 Oct 2013, 10:03:54 UTC - in response to Message 1435253.  

The only thing I'd recommend as a precautionary measure if you choose the SSD is to decrease the checkpoint interval in BOINC and disable the pagefile (should work without any issue with 32GB RAM).

You of course meant 'increase the checkpoint interval in BOINC' (e.g. from 60 s to 300 s)

And I think all modern SSDs (and USB flash drives) have Wear leveling
(if you write at the same sector/LBA many times in fact different cells are used (SSD disk controller maintains internal table LBA -> physical cell/block))
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wear_leveling

http://www.informationweek.com/storage/systems/demystifying-ssd-wear-leveling/229402749
http://searchsolidstatestorage.techtarget.com/definition/wear-leveling





- ALF - "Find out what you don't do well ..... then don't do it!" :)
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Message 1435533 - Posted: 30 Oct 2013, 10:45:38 UTC - in response to Message 1435519.  

The only thing I'd recommend as a precautionary measure if you choose the SSD is to decrease the checkpoint interval in BOINC and disable the pagefile (should work without any issue with 32GB RAM).

You of course meant 'increase the checkpoint interval in BOINC' (e.g. from 60 s to 300 s)

Yes. I was going to write something about decreasing the amount of writes from BOINC and changed that later to make it more clear what setting I mean, apparently I forgot this word. Ups.
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Message 1435585 - Posted: 30 Oct 2013, 13:38:26 UTC - in response to Message 1435533.  


Maybe also to consider:

1) Disable Last Access Time Stamps
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms940846(v=winembedded.5).aspx
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff794679(v=winembedded.60).aspx

(just did the change on XP - needed to create NtfsDisableLastAccessUpdate - was not there)

I don't know if "it's disabled by default in Windows 7" as posted here:
http://superuser.com/questions/200126/are-there-any-negative-effects-of-disabling-the-last-access-timestamp

AndrejaKo: "I'm on fresh installation of windows 7 64bit here and NtfsDisableLastAccessUpdate is set to 1 by default."


2) Disabling Disk Defragmentation
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/library/ms932871(v=winembedded.5).aspx

(again I don't know if this is relevant for Windows 7 or it detects SSD and do some necessary adjustments)





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Message 1435650 - Posted: 30 Oct 2013, 17:21:14 UTC - in response to Message 1435585.  



I don't know if "it's disabled by default in Windows 7" as posted here:
http://superuser.com/questions/200126/are-there-any-negative-effects-of-disabling-the-last-access-timestamp

AndrejaKo: "I'm on fresh installation of windows 7 64bit here and NtfsDisableLastAccessUpdate is set to 1 by default."



Just checked this on my main system (Win 7 64) and it's set to disabled, I didn't do this myself, so I would have to agree that it's disabled by default.

Also, I have been using SSDs as the boot drive on my systems for a few years now (and as the only drive in my laptop). One of my older ones is currently showing 709 days of powered on time - it's in a system that isn't always on, so I'd guess the drive is going on 3 years old now. I haven't had any real issues with the actual medium yet. I did have an issue with a Crucial M4 that had a bug related to uptime and that drive had to be RMA'd, but that was due to firmware, not the medium. I currently have Samsung, Plextor, Intel and Kingston SSDs in use. I do have nightly backups running to a NAS just in case, though. (And that's a good idea no matter what kind of drive is being used!)

-Dave

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Message 1435652 - Posted: 30 Oct 2013, 17:24:09 UTC - in response to Message 1435585.  

At least disk defrag should be disabled by default on Win7, but I'd check that after installation and if no other drives present, disable permanently the corresponding service.
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Message 1436646 - Posted: 1 Nov 2013, 20:19:36 UTC
Last modified: 1 Nov 2013, 20:25:19 UTC

Thanks to all.

I got the motherboard.
But was surprised about how (it looks (it's the first time I get a server/workstation board)).

Just a brown box. A sticker with 'QS' and tape over it close this box.
I opened the tape and saw just a plastic bag, inside the motherboard.
The plastic bag have 4 yellow sticker which close the bag.
The 4 yellow stickers all over each other.
Three are opened and the last one on the top, is closed.
No quick install guide in the box.
No CD.
No cables.

An used motherboard?
Hmm..?

I chatted with the Intel Support and they said there is something wrong with the motherboard and I should send back the box.
Will do it tomorrow.

I chatted IIRC three times now with the Intel Support (always they had different nicknames), and not always I got the correct answer (I saw it later after I read infos in the web).
So the person is right, that in the box should be a quick install guide, CD, cables?

I thought, at least the brown box is in a colored paper box, on this a picture of the motherboard and infos about it (so we all know it from the desktop motherboards).
No?

How should look the packing and what should come with the W2600CR2 motherboard?


Which power supply I would need to let run this motherboard, a regular desktop or a server power supply?
The W2600CR2 motherboard have 1x 24pin (motherboard), 2x 8pin (CPUs) and 1x 4pin (on the bottom right) connectors (picture).
For what is the on the bottom right 4pin power connector?
This all above mentioned 4 plugs should get power from just one power supply?
I'll let run anyway more PSUs, so this 4pin could get power from a 2nd PSU?

Thanks.

* Best regards! :-) * Philip J. Fry, team seti.international founder. * Optimize your PC for higher RAC. * SETI@home needs your help. *
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Message 1436688 - Posted: 1 Nov 2013, 21:56:09 UTC

24pin-connector and the 2x8-pin-connectors are mandatory, the 4pin-connector only if applicable (see Quick start guide for WR2600CR family)
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Message 1436716 - Posted: 1 Nov 2013, 23:14:13 UTC - in response to Message 1436646.  
Last modified: 1 Nov 2013, 23:24:58 UTC

I got the motherboard.
But was surprised about how (it looks (it's the first time I get a server/workstation board)).

Just a brown box. A sticker with 'QS' and tape over it close this box.
I opened the tape and saw just a plastic bag, inside the motherboard.
The plastic bag have 4 yellow sticker which close the bag.
The 4 yellow stickers all over each other.
Three are opened and the last one on the top, is closed.
No quick install guide in the box.
No CD.
No cables.

An used motherboard?
Hmm..?

I don't know how Intel packs mainboards for professional users, but those actually don't need to be impressed with fancy boxes and large numbers on them. So a brown box should be good enough.

I often bought a hard drive or CD/DVD drive just in a transparent plastic bag without anything on it except for the price sticker from the shop, in case of optical drives usually not even closed with a piece of tape. That's what you get when you buy the "bulk" version instead of the more expensive "retail" version (that's at least how they are called here in Germany), which contains a fancy box around the drive and lots of other usually useless crap.

So far I have not seen a "bulk" packed mainboard, but actually that should work too.

Check if you can find some information and a manual about it on Intel's homepage. Usually it's written in the manual what's supposed to be in the box.



Which power supply I would need to let run this motherboard, a regular desktop or a server power supply?
The W2600CR2 motherboard have 1x 24pin (motherboard), 2x 8pin (CPUs) and 1x 4pin (on the bottom right) connectors (picture).
For what is the on the bottom right 4pin power connector?
This all above mentioned 4 plugs should get power from just one power supply?
I'll let run anyway more PSUs, so this 4pin could get power from a 2nd PSU?

I'd highly recommend from one PSU, I wouldn't even try to run it from two different, they can have slightly different voltages.


Now that I see what mainboard you have: if you don't like SSD but want something with a better performance than a standard desktop HDD, you could take 15k SAS HDD.
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Profile [SETI.Germany] Sutaru Tsureku (aka Dirk :-)
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Message 1436854 - Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 4:06:30 UTC

Here (.PDF file) I can read the motherboard need a 'SSI EPS 5V compliant power supply, 750W minimum'.

This is really new for me ..
What does this mean?

I worry, I regular PC power supply don't work.
Or yes?

Thanks.

* Best regards! :-) * Philip J. Fry, team seti.international founder. * Optimize your PC for higher RAC. * SETI@home needs your help. *
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Message 1436871 - Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 4:50:27 UTC

Maybe you two should speak in German. I find it silly to speak to a fellow Country member in English. Evenso it is easier for me, to post in English not in German, but I try. When the opportunity is open.
Translation software sucks at this time. We still have volunteers tho.

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Message 1436880 - Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 5:19:47 UTC

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Message 1436888 - Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 5:34:51 UTC

The 5v part of that description means that the 5v standby load must be capable of a 4-6amp load rating which no standard ATX power supply can supply and those type of server PSU's don't come cheap.

Cheers.
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Message 1436986 - Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 13:02:35 UTC - in response to Message 1436888.  

The 5v part of that description means that the 5v standby load must be capable of a 4-6amp load rating which no standard ATX power supply can supply and those type of server PSU's don't come cheap.

Cheers.

750W has 3.0A/4.0A as max. continous load on 5VSB (see p25) and it's also remarked, that the higher value is only needed for ACPI S3 power state. So 3.0A should be enough since this thing will probably run 24/7 anyway.
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Message 1437114 - Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 21:39:20 UTC

Thanks to all.

Uli, maybe we should continue in english ..
So other members see that it's not so easy to build a workstation (2x CPU socket) machine (.. like I thought in past ;-).

So I understand it correct:
SSI = EPS ?

Intel sell this motherboard in a workstation case.
They use at least the '750 Watt Intel FXX750PCRPS Non-Modular 80+ Platin' PSU.
I didn't found the specs, so I don't know the A power at +5Vsb (standby).
Maybe someone could find it, so I would know which A at least needed.

I looked around and the Corsair AX and TX series (AFAIK, at least 750W+) have 2x EPS (8pin) connectors.
And EPS v2.92 (the latest/newest) standard.
So they should work, or not?

BTW. The machine will work just under full load and maybe sometimes switched off for pull out the dust.
So normally the +5Vsb with 3 A would work, or (because it's not needed/used)?

Because of the 4pin power connector on the bottom right.
Usage if 'applicable'.
What does this mean?
If the PSU have this connector?
Maybe I could use an adaptor which make a PCIe 6pin or 8pin to a 4pin power connector?
(The 1st PSU will just let run the motherboard/CPUs/HDD (maybe fans), so enough free connectors available)

* Best regards! :-) * Philip J. Fry, team seti.international founder. * Optimize your PC for higher RAC. * SETI@home needs your help. *
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Message 1437156 - Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 23:35:44 UTC

Good work. Making me very jealous!
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Message 1437171 - Posted: 3 Nov 2013, 0:22:16 UTC

Because of the 4pin power connector on the bottom right.
Usage if 'applicable'.
What does this mean?
If the PSU have this connector?
Maybe I could use an adaptor which make a PCIe 6pin or 8pin to a 4pin power connector?
(The 1st PSU will just let run the motherboard/CPUs/HDD (maybe fans), so enough free connectors available)

Yes, exactly. If the PSU is missing this connector then the connector is not "applicable".
Don't try to connect it with anything until you know exactly if some needed functions would be missing, if not connected.

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Message 1437172 - Posted: 3 Nov 2013, 0:22:37 UTC

That is everyone's choice. I am just a proponent, that everyone should feel free to post in their mother tongue.
I am happy this new built is a giving you a diversion.
Pluto will always be a planet to me.

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Message 1437194 - Posted: 3 Nov 2013, 1:33:24 UTC - in response to Message 1437114.  
Last modified: 3 Nov 2013, 1:53:25 UTC

(...)
Uli, maybe we should continue in english ..
So other members see that it's not so easy to build a workstation (2x CPU socket) machine (.. like I thought in past ;-).
(...)

I see now this could be misunderstood.

I don't want to say, hey look what I do.
I thought, maybe an other member would like to build a similar machine, then he could find here in this thread useful info.

.. so it would be well we write still in english. :-)

* Best regards! :-) * Philip J. Fry, team seti.international founder. * Optimize your PC for higher RAC. * SETI@home needs your help. *
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Message 1437200 - Posted: 3 Nov 2013, 1:53:02 UTC - in response to Message 1437172.  

Thanks to all.

elec999 wrote:
Good work. Making me very jealous!

It was a good idea to build this machine.
I started it innocently.
But now I hope this machine will not exceed my budget.

~ €5.200 for the hardware.
For the ~ 1.500W I would need to pay ~ €300/month.

*scratching the head*

Uli wrote:
That is everyone's choice. I am just a proponent, that everyone should feel free to post in their mother tongue.
I am happy this new built is a giving you a diversion.

Yes, currently (in this/my difficult time) I need a lot of distraction.

* Best regards! :-) * Philip J. Fry, team seti.international founder. * Optimize your PC for higher RAC. * SETI@home needs your help. *
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Message boards : Number crunching : 4x HD7990 + 2x E5-2630v2


 
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