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Profile betregerProject donor
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Message 1419015 - Posted: 22 Sep 2013, 17:51:14 UTC

A well spent couple of minutes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEheh1BH34Q
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Message 1419038 - Posted: 22 Sep 2013, 19:08:52 UTC - in response to Message 1419015.

A well spent couple of minutes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEheh1BH34Q

Canis Majoris has an impressive size, about 1400 times the diameter of the Sun. The volume ratio is massive: 1400^3 = 2.7 billion times the volume of the Sun. But it is only 17 times the mass of the Sun, so it's average density is 17/2700000000 = 0.000000006 as much as the sun.

Basically it's outer layers are wispy clouds of probably warmish gas. I doubt it has a well defined surface as portrayed in the video.

Nonetheless that is one of my favorite videos.

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Message 1419095 - Posted: 22 Sep 2013, 21:53:25 UTC - in response to Message 1419038.

A well spent couple of minutes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEheh1BH34Q

Thanks for the video!

Imagine all the possibilities of life out there.

The universe wastes nothing, it's simply transferred.
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Message 1419221 - Posted: 23 Sep 2013, 10:48:22 UTC

Thanks for the video!


+1
Quite interesting
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Message 1419362 - Posted: 23 Sep 2013, 18:08:19 UTC - in response to Message 1419015.

A well spent couple of minutes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEheh1BH34Q


Seti-At-Home ought to have a 'video of the year' award. If it did, that would get my serious consideration.

Premier find.

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Message 1423623 - Posted: 3 Oct 2013, 16:42:16 UTC

I'll put this here to avoid creating another thread.

An international team of scientists has found evidence of a mysterious anti-gravity force that is causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate.

Oh yeah?

The scientists expected to find that the expansion of the universe was slowing slightly from the effect of gravity. Instead, they say, it is actually speeding up. One of the scientists involved, Robert Kirshner said the acceleration would continue and within billions of years many of the stars now seen would disappear from view.

I would have thought that it was quite obvious really. In the vacuum of space, with planets, stars, galaxies, black holes, millions or billions of light years apart. There would be no gravitational effect. Therefore an inititial force would go on accelerating with no resistance.

And they call these people experts?

Gravity




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Message 1423764 - Posted: 3 Oct 2013, 20:26:37 UTC

I thought that was old news already. Read about it a few times. But who can you call an expert then, even with those molecular weight changes, everybody learned about the chemical elements and the periodic table in school. And that's something we can all grasp, let alone the things there are we have no clue about and will maybe never understand...
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Message 1423809 - Posted: 3 Oct 2013, 22:47:23 UTC

It was old news, 1998 actually. Ooooopps !

Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Star sizes

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