Asteroids & Comets

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Michael Watson

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Message 1443423 - Posted: 17 Nov 2013, 17:32:23 UTC

We're told that it would take the pressure of the Solar wind, and the re-radiation of Solar heat from the object roughly one million years to spin P/2013 P5 up from some reasonable slower rate of rotation to the point of centrifugal disruption. We are also told that this object is likely a 200 million year old fragment of a asteroidal collision that created the Flora family of asteroids.
My question is this: Why did P/2013 P5 wait around for 199 million of those years, and only then begin to spin up in response to the Sun's influence? Or put another way: Why hadn't it spun itself up to the point of disruption 199 million years ago, and long, long ago destroyed itself?
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Michael Watson

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Message 1444193 - Posted: 19 Nov 2013, 20:25:48 UTC

The activity of P/2013 P5, whatever is actually happening to it, seems to be increasing over time. Dr. Jessica Agarwal, working on the idea that it is releasing bursts of dust from time to time, did some computer simulations. She found that modeling how dusts of various fineness would disperse in space eventually gave a good match to the appearance of P/2013 P5.
She projects that tails were emitted by the object on April 15th, July 18th and 24th, August 8th and 26th, and September 4th. These dates are not evenly spaced. The second is 94 days after the first. Thereafter, the bursts of activity are separated by 6, 15,16, and 11 days, in chronological order. A change seems to have occurred between April and July. The tails were being created much more frequently from then on.
It will be interesting to see if this level of activity continues, or even increases in later observations.
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Message 1444331 - Posted: 20 Nov 2013, 2:29:27 UTC - in response to Message 1444193.  

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Message 1447330 - Posted: 27 Nov 2013, 7:24:44 UTC

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Message 1455635 - Posted: 19 Dec 2013, 23:40:47 UTC - in response to Message 1447330.  

NASA's Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE), a spacecraft that made the most comprehensive survey to date of asteroids and comets, has returned its first set of test images in preparation for a renewed mission.


NASA’s NEOWISE spacecraft opened its "eyes" after more than two years of slumber to see the starry sky. This image of a patch of sky in the constellation Pisces is among the first taken by the spacecraft’s infrared cameras.

http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/neowise/asteroid-20131219/index.html#.UrODfPuIp6o


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Message 1460458 - Posted: 4 Jan 2014, 2:36:59 UTC - in response to Message 1455635.  

Several sources confirm that the first discovered asteroid in 2014, designated 2014 AA, entered Earth’s atmosphere late Jan. 1 (Jan. 2 Universal time) over the mid-Atlantic Ocean. The Catalina Sky Survey operating near Tucson, Ariz. discovered this very small asteroid -- 6 to 9 feet (2 to 3 meters) in size -- early on the morning of Jan. 1, and immediately followed up on it. (An animation of the discovery images is shown in Figure 1). The asteroid entered Earth’s atmosphere about 21 hours later, and probably broke up.

http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/asteroid/first-2014-asteroid-20140102/index.html
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Message 1461621 - Posted: 8 Jan 2014, 0:37:49 UTC - in response to Message 1460458.  

they better keep an eye on this one.

NASA's Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) spacecraft has spotted a never-before-seen asteroid -- its first such discovery since coming out of hibernation last year.

http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/january/recently-reactivated-nasa-spacecraft-spots-its-first-new-asteroid-0/index.html#.Usyc3_uIp6q

Recently Reactivated NASA Spacecraft Spots Its First New Asteroid
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Message 1464648 - Posted: 15 Jan 2014, 17:18:50 UTC

First 2014 Asteroid Discovered: Update


Early this year - for just the second time in history - an asteroid was discovered before it impacted the Earth. Quite harmless though, it was very small, probably just a few meters across, and burned up harmlessly in our atmosphere.
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Message 1467476 - Posted: 22 Jan 2014, 22:56:45 UTC - in response to Message 1464648.  

Scientists using the Herschel space observatory have made the first definitive detection of water vapor on the largest and roundest object in the asteroid belt, Ceres. Ceres is classified as a dwarf planet, a solar system body bigger than an asteroid and smaller than a planet.

http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/herschel/ceres-20140122/index.html#.UuBLBvtMHSc
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Message 1467709 - Posted: 23 Jan 2014, 14:43:33 UTC - in response to Message 1467476.  

There is a mission going to Ceres, Dawn. It should arrive in 2015.
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Message 1467947 - Posted: 24 Jan 2014, 0:34:19 UTC - in response to Message 1467709.  

There is a mission going to Ceres, Dawn. It should arrive in 2015.
Tullio



Thanks Tullio!
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Message 1478495 - Posted: 18 Feb 2014, 0:11:24 UTC - in response to Message 1467947.  

A gigantic asteroid nearly 900 feet wide will race past planet Earth tonight, a harmless but sobering reminder of the dangers posed by such interplanetary visitors.
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Message 1478690 - Posted: 18 Feb 2014, 10:47:32 UTC

there is any way what we can do, if know, asteroid going to hit earth?
i suppose - no ( except a sent to it Bruce Willis with dynamite :D ).
and from another side - there is already too many human beings on that planet. and even our civilization is ugly planet killer really - maybe it is better to take a hit from cosmos and start all from scratch? maybe then result be a better, than that, who we see around now?
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Message 1478695 - Posted: 18 Feb 2014, 11:15:08 UTC
Last modified: 18 Feb 2014, 11:20:37 UTC

there is any way what we can do, if know, asteroid going to hit earth?


That's why Orbit@home is, was, (will be) a very important project(again)!

http://orbit.psi.edu/
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Message 1478702 - Posted: 18 Feb 2014, 11:29:34 UTC - in response to Message 1478695.  

i do not see, why it can be important.
ok, you do know, after a week or month, or a year gigantic asteroid, say 1 km in diameter, with possibility of 0.972 hit the earth.

and what?
all what that information do for you - you can be ready to die...
there is not any possibility to change that asteroid trajectory, or anihillate them...
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Message 1478711 - Posted: 18 Feb 2014, 12:00:21 UTC - in response to Message 1478702.  
Last modified: 18 Feb 2014, 12:07:07 UTC

i do not see, why it can be important.
ok, you do know, after a week or month, or a year gigantic asteroid, say 1 km in diameter, with possibility of 0.972 hit the earth.

and what?
all what that information do for you - you can be ready to die...
there is not any possibility to change that asteroid trajectory, or anihillate them...



Humans are an inquisitive species. There's a reason why we do so much research you know.

You're probably right though that we won't be able to stop an asteriod on it's collision course with earth. Real life isn't like the movies unfortunately...
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Message 1478715 - Posted: 18 Feb 2014, 12:15:36 UTC - in response to Message 1478711.  

>There's a reason why we do so much research you know.

yes, without doubt. and many of that research is designed to got money, funds and so on - nothing good to humanity or civilization. like a all experiments with hydrogen fuel on internal combustion engines, who is idiotism by itself...
as so, there is a good way to try to see right, primary reason, why that or another project has created and run. not always it be running for that reason, who is declared worldwide...sadly, but most humans is no sapiens. and almost all is no good, trustable, creatures....
imho.
all facts around us every day say it.
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Message 1478736 - Posted: 18 Feb 2014, 13:16:44 UTC
Last modified: 18 Feb 2014, 13:17:57 UTC

nothing good to humanity or civilization


Most scientific research is actually very good voor humanity, let's think of cancer for example. Research for curing cancer saved al lot of lives already!

most humans is no sapiens


LOL, why am I thinking of politicians now...
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Message 1479289 - Posted: 19 Feb 2014, 20:36:05 UTC

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Message 1479445 - Posted: 20 Feb 2014, 3:21:58 UTC

Two million miles, in the galactic scheme of things, that was close. Personally I hope that the collective genius of the scientific and engineering community will be able to find a way to divert or destroy the big one when it is detected. Also maybe by then mankind will have spread out to colonize other planets or moons in the solar system so that if a planet killer heads earth's way some of us will survive.
Bob DeWoody

My motto: Never do today what you can put off until tomorrow as it may not be required. This no longer applies in light of current events.
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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Asteroids & Comets


 
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