Planet Hunters Report Record-Breaking Discovery, Search for other habitable planets

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Message 1889594 - Posted: 13 Sep 2017, 19:23:35 UTC - in response to Message 1887139.  


Three 'super-Earth' exoplanets orbiting nearby star discovered



(Phys.org)—NASA's prolonged Kepler mission, known as K2, has made another significant discovery, revealing the existence of three new exoplanets. The newly found alien worlds circle the nearby star GJ 9827 and were classified as "super-Earths." The finding is presented in a paper published Sept. 6 on arXiv.org.

Kepler is the most prolific planet-hunting telescope. The spacecraft has discovered more than 2,300 exoplanets to date. After the failure of its two reaction wheels in 2013, the mission was repurposed as K2 to perform high-precision photometry of selected fields in the ecliptic. Since then, the revived Kepler spacecraft has detected nearly 160 extrasolar worlds.
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Message 1889607 - Posted: 13 Sep 2017, 20:27:08 UTC

The coolest of these three superEarth planets is calculated to have a temperature about 700 degrees F. Rather hot for life as we know it. Perhaps some form of life based on silicon-oxygen chain molecules (silicones)? These have the advantage of being much more resistant to heat than ordinary life materials.
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Message 1898403 - Posted: 31 Oct 2017, 5:42:55 UTC - in response to Message 1889607.  

update:



We may have found 20 habitable worlds hiding in plain sight


There could be more habitable planets out there than we thought. An analysis of data from the Kepler space telescope has revealed 20 promising worlds that might be able to host life.

The list of potential worlds includes several planets that orbit stars like our sun. Some take a relatively long time to complete a single orbit, with the longest taking 395 Earth days and others taking Earth weeks or months. The fastest orbit is 18 Earth days. This is very different to the very short “years” we see around smaller stars with habitable planets like Proxima Centauri.

The exoplanet with a 395-day year is one of the most promising worlds for life on the list, says Jeff Coughlin, a Kepler team lead who helped find the potential planets. Called KOI-7923.01, it is 97 per cent the size of Earth, but a little colder.
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Message 1901175 - Posted: 15 Nov 2017, 13:57:30 UTC - in response to Message 1898403.  

Meet Ross 128 b!


Nearby planet is a target in search for life


Astronomers have found a cool, Earth-sized planet that's relatively close to our Solar System.

The properties of this newly discovered planet - called Ross 128 b - make it a prime target in the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.

At just 11 light-years away, it's the second closest exoplanet of its kind to Earth.

But the closest one, known as Proxima b, looks to be less hospitable for life.

Found in 2016, it orbits the star Proxima Centauri, which is known to be a rather active "red dwarf" star. This means that powerful eruptions of charged particles periodically batter Proxima b with harmful radiation.
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Message 1901190 - Posted: 15 Nov 2017, 16:03:34 UTC

Even though Ross 128 is very nearby, by cosmic standards, it's not visible to the unaided eye. It wasn't even discovered by telescope until 1926.

It's thought to be aged about 9 & 1/2 billion years, over twice as old as our Sun. This may be why it hasn't much flare activity. Red dwarf stars tend to 'settle down', as they age.

This makes the newly discerned planet a better prospect for life. The great age of the system suggests that there may have been more than ample time for intelligent life to evolve. This makes Ross 128 b an attractive target for SETI monitoring.
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Message 1901330 - Posted: 16 Nov 2017, 11:44:38 UTC

but this line of enquiry is expected to be boosted immeasurably when observatories such as the European Southern Observatory's Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) and

I'm just waiting for a "Really really so big you won't believe it" telescope.

Yep we need a RRSBYWBI to beat all the rest :-)))
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Message boards : SETI@home Science : Planet Hunters Report Record-Breaking Discovery, Search for other habitable planets


 
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